Tag Archive for: WOC Nurse

In an effort to contribute to a solution on narrowing that large gap between the patients who need a certified ostomy nurse and the number of available certified ostomy nurses, United Ostomy Associations of America, Inc. is sponsoring a scholarship award. More nurses specialized in ostomy care will lead to improved ostomy care in the United States.

Thanks to the ongoing generosity of the ostomy community donating to the scholarship fund, UOAA can provide this annual award in the amount of $3000. UOAA is excited to announce that the 2022 recipient of the Educational Award for Ostomy Nurse Certification is Jessica Peters from Maryland!

Below a grateful and honored Jessica shares a little bit about herself and her motivation to become a certified ostomy nurse.

I have worked as a surgical nurse at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center (JHBMC) since graduating with my Associate degree from Community College of Baltimore County, in Maryland in 2008. In 2020 I received my Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree from Chamberlain University. Now an Advancement in Clinical Excellence (ACE) nurse, and a permanent charge nurse, I strive for the best patient outcomes.

In 2021 I received the Johns Hopkins school of nursing’s “Jarvis Star Nurse Award” for outstanding clinical excellence in nursing. In 2022 I humbly accepted the “Nurse of the Year” award from my hospital, JHBMC.

I contribute to both hospital and unit councils and committees, and my passions include mobility, safe patient handling equipment, ostomy, wound education, Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP), and fall prevention.

My motivation and excitement to become a certified ostomy nurse come from the experiences and knowledge I’ve attained working in the surgical unit for 13 years at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. Working in General surgery, you see many medical diagnoses and care for the patients following various surgical procedures. Colorectal and continent diversion surgeries are common in our unit, and I’ve noticed that patients, particularly receiving ostomy care and education, are unique and have many challenges to overcome. It takes extraordinary compassion to care for a patient having this surgery. I believe an ostomate is on a journey, and I’ve always wanted to be there on their journey, making sure every step is taken with care and consideration.

At the end of 2020, my passion for ostomy care evolved when I started the JHBMC’s first-ever “unit-based” ostomy committee. The committee meets monthly and has an organized agenda for discussion. The diverse group includes the unit staff, case manager, dietitian, surgeons, and Wound Ostomy Continence nurses from inpatient and outpatient healthcare teams. Our streamlined approach relies on communicating about the ostomate throughout the transitions of care. We also share best practices as a group and have created tools to make educating the patient as unambiguous as possible.  With the committee’s support, I created a spreadsheet to audit for proper orders and tasks required during the hospital stay and a step-by-step bedside checklist to ensure all ostomy tasks and teaching are completed before discharge. We have achieved much as a committee but most profoundly, we have the data to show our ostomy best practices, and comprehensive education model resulted in zero hospital readmissions from 2021-2022!

I plan to contribute to the field by sharing the insight and best practices I’ve gained from the committee at my hospital. I have the most incredible Wound Ostomy Continence nurse mentor and plan to receive my certification through the WEB WOC Nursing Education Program.

The past two years have been exciting, and it’s been a privilege to have a career that I love. My ultimate goal is to have the best skills and knowledge in ostomy care and to serve my hospital and community independently as a certified ostomy nurse. I look forward to advancing my career and can’t wait to continue this journey.

Congratulations, Jessica!

The next scholarship application will be available in January 2023 and closes on June 30, 2023. 

If you’d like to donate to the Ostomy Nurse Scholarship Fund online, please complete the Donate Form, and at the bottom under the ”Additional Comments” section, please note “Ostomy Nurse Scholarship Fund”. You can also send a check made payable to UOAA, in the memo line include the Fund name, and mail to PO Box 525, Kennebunk, ME  04043.

By Robin Glover

Ostomy surgery is a life-changing event. As ostomates, we go through things other people will never have to experience. Everybody’s story is different, but we have all shared in many similar aspects of our journeys. We are a unique community of strong and courageous people of all ages and backgrounds.

To celebrate that, United Ostomy Associations of America is hosting the UOAA 2022 Virtual Ostomy Symposium on Saturday, August 13, 2022 from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Eastern Time (7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Pacific) including breaks.

This symposium will feature a mix of ostomates, j-pouchers, and medical professionals delivering a fun, engaging, and informative day of learning, laughing, and community-building.

Questions you were too afraid to ask will be answered. Questions you didn’t even know you had will be answered.

In all, 22 speakers will be bringing their expertise on a variety of ostomy-related subjects. (And don’t worry, each session will be recorded so if you can’t make it live that day or can’t see all of the ones you want, you’ll be able to watch them later.)

You can find the full list of speakers and the agenda here.

What to Expect

The virtual lobby will be open at 10:30 AM EDT before the speaker sessions begin to chat, troubleshoot any tech issues and explore the agenda. Ticket holders get an email with a unique link to the event. Attendees are encouraged to enter “lounges” organized by ostomy or continent diversion type (and one for caregivers) to chat or meet with others like you. These will be open for the entirety of the event for those who want to pop in and out during breaks.

Sponsor Booths will also be open throughout the event to give ticket holders the opportunity to talk with representatives of ostomy product manufacturers and suppliers ­– and learn about the latest product advancements. Thanks to all our symposium sponsors including Platinum Sponsor Convatec for helping to make this event possible.

The most important participant for this year’s UOAA Virtual Ostomy Symposium is you.

After opening remarks from UOAA leadership, the symposium will kick off on the Main Stage with Louie Green, a standup comic and recent ostomate. He’s going to share his poignant ostomy journey with a bit of welcoming wit.

Next on the Main Stage at 12:40 AM EDT, Joy Hooper’s Ostomy BUZZables presentation will present the newest innovations and ostomy products available on the market. If there’s something new in the ostomy world, you’ll hear about it here.

Educational Sessions 

Throughout the day, Educational Sessions will run concurrently between the Main Stage where you’ll get to hear from wonderful WOC nurses, experienced ostomates, amazing doctors and dedicated advocates.

Presentations will cover everything from sex and intimacy and traveling the world with an ostomy to nutrition and staying hydrated and dealing with hernias. Other session topics will focus on peristomal skin issues, aging in place with an ostomy, affiliated support groups, and secrets of the big four stoma types.

There will also be a special workshop for young adults. Inspiring ostomates Molly Atwater-Pulisic and Collin Jarvis will be co-hosting the conversation about physical activity, relationships, and mental health for ostomates ages 18-35.

Attendees will be able to submit questions for the speakers during the presentations and the speakers presentation materials will be available to access at you leisure.

After these educational sessions be sure not to miss Dr. Janice Beitz back on the Main Stage at 3:55 PM EDT for a presentation titled If You See a Toilet in Your Dreams, do NOT use it! Emotional Support, Quality of Life and Humor. It will look at the power of humor in dealing with emotional challenges while dispelling some myths and misconceptions about ostomies.

The event will come to a close with a special presentation from Magen Cherry, a j-poucher and winner of the 2007 Miss Texas USA competition. She uses her platform to share encouragement and bring hope to fellow ostomates and j-pouchers coming to terms with their new reality. Fun fact: Magen had a colonoscopy three days after being crowned Miss Texas USA!

Connecting with a Caring Community

Of course, there are going to be plenty of great speakers but the most important participant for this year’s UOAA Virtual Symposium is you. By taking part in this event, you’ll be able to connect with a thriving ostomy community (or j-pouchers or any other type of continent diversion) and help us grow even stronger.

As we all know, living with an ostomy or other continent diversion isn’t always easy. It can be isolating. Sometimes even close friends and family don’t want to hear anything about it. There’s fear of the future and worry about existing relationships.

Many new ostomates want to hide it forever and hope no one ever finds out. But, through organizations like UOAA, they’ll find out they’re not alone and that life with an ostomy shouldn’t be something to be ashamed of, but rather that ostomies are life-savers and that you can join others in a celebration of being alive.

This year’s event is going to be awesome. Questions you were too afraid to ask will be answered. Questions you didn’t even know you had will be answered. You’ll get to connect with wonderful people while gaining inspiration and knowledge that could impact the rest of your life – and the lives of others.

As you can see this is not your typical webinar or Zoom call and the $35 ticket (plus $3.88 processing fee) and sponsor support of UOAA (a 501(c)(3) charity) help to offset the costs of hosting this special event.

All of this is leading to UOAA’s in-person National Conference in Houston in August of 2023. The connections you build during this year’s virtual event can open the door to even deeper friendships when we all get to meet each other face-to-face next year in Houston!

The UOAA 2022 Virtual Ostomy Symposium on Saturday, August 13th is going to be a great time and a great experience. And we need you there to make it even better.

To get all the information, learn more about the speakers, or find out how to get tickets, head to the event website.

By Robin Glover

Oh no! An ostomy! You’re going to be pooping or peeing into a bag attached to your stomach?? Your life is over, right? No more dating. No one will ever like you. Children will run from you! It’s so gross!

Don’t worry. We’ve all been there. As great as they can turn out to be, the idea of getting an ostomy is never really welcomed news. Add on to that, you’re probably very sick and haven’t eaten well in weeks and you’re tired and worried and feel alone. You know nothing about ostomies and are wondering what life will be like with one.

Will having an ostomy bag eventually become second nature and you won’t even really think or worry about it? Yes.

First of all, life is going to be great! You’ll feel better. You’ll eat better. You won’t be bleeding out of unspeakable places and constantly panic-stricken about finding the nearest bathroom. Your life will become more consistent and routine and you’ll end up being happy you had a lifesaving, life-improving surgery.

It’s possible that you don’t believe that right now, though. And while it does turn out to be a good thing for most, there is an adjustment period and a lot of unknowns and myths. For instance, how do I change my ostomy bag? Will I stink? What if I have an accident in public? Can I ever play sports again? Or exercise? Or go swimming?

In short– is it easy? No. Will it be fine? Yes, yes and yes. But for a little expanded information and peace of mind, we can go into a little more detail.

How Do I Change My Ostomy Bag?

You gently peel it off, wipe things off a bit, and put another one on. It really does become as simple as that. But, at first, you’ll hopefully have a specialized ostomy nurse that will teach you how to do it. After your surgery, you likely won’t have to change it yourself the first several times. But, you should practice doing it and will be better off if you make the effort to know how before you leave the hospital. It also helps to know what the standards of care should be for ostomy patients and speak out before you are discharged and sent on your way.

If you did not have access to a certified ostomy nurse in your hospital be sure to seek one out. You can also find a Wound, Ostomy and Continence (WOC) Nurse or an Ostomy Management Specialist (OMS) through product manufacturers and telehealth services.

Will My Ostomy Bag Leak?

At first, Yes. It likely will. You might even get really frustrated in the beginning because you can’t seem to put it on as well as the nurse in the hospital. Even if you put it on “perfectly” and follow all the steps your ostomy pouch can still leak. You’ll get the hang of it, though. Every ostomy and everybody is different. You’ll learn what supplies you need, where to get them, and how to use them to make sure the fit is just right.

While you might be hesitant to leave the house for a while, you’ll soon feel totally confident going anywhere you want, any time you want. And better yet? You won’t be constantly worried about being near a bathroom! There’s always the risk of a leak, though. But it won’t be a big deal. You’ll be able to detect it quickly and take care of it.

Will I Smell?

No. If the appliance is attached correctly, you should never stink. No one will be able to smell you. You can be as close as you want to other people. You can go out and be in a crowded bar and nobody will know you have an ostomy bag. There are also plenty of clothing and garment options to fit well with your pouch and conceal it from anyone ever knowing – if that’s how you choose to approach it.

If you do ever smell, that means you need to check your pouch for any leaks or openings allowing odor to escape. And if you happen to be in public, you can carry tape or any of a variety of things to sneak off into the bathroom and do a quick fix. Will it be uncomfortable or scary the first time it happens? Yes. Will having an ostomy bag eventually become second nature and you won’t even really think or worry about it? Yes.

(Quick note: The answer to a lot of questions about having an ostomy is that “you’ll figure it out” or “you’ll become comfortable” because everything will be new when you first have an ostomy bag. There’s no step-by-step guide. There will be frustrations. Maybe some tears. It’s an adjustment. Nobody just has ostomy surgery, learns to put on a pouch, and then goes about their business. You will have issues. You may have some stained clothes and probably need to change your bedsheets one or two times. But, you will figure it out.)

Can I Do Whatever I Want?

Generally speaking, yes. Of course, this depends on every unique situation, and only you and your doctor can accurately answer this question. But, in general, you’ll be able to do whatever you want. Simply having an ostomy won’t restrict you from doing anything. You might even be able to do a whole lot more than you could before.

You’ll be able to go swimming, play rugby, do mixed martial arts, teach yoga, travel the world, go on dates, and do anything you were physically capable of before having surgery. All without worrying about being in constant pain or eating the wrong thing or needing to run to the bathroom every five minutes. However, make sure to wait 6-8 weeks or until your doctor approves you for any strenuous physical activity before winning the local 5k again. (Perhaps you’ll even want to take part in UOAA’s own Ostomy 5k.)

Getting An Ostomy Is Totally Worth It

All the details about how to change your ostomy pouch where to get supplies, and when you can go back to doing the things you love will get worked out. But the important thing to remember is that having ostomy surgery is going to be totally worth it. Even if your head is spinning now about what life will be like, it will calm down.

And also remember that you’re not alone. One of the best ways to prepare is to call or visit an ostomy support and information group before you have surgery. Many others have been through the same process and are more than eager to offer a listening ear and emotional support. UOAA also offers a new ostomy patient guide and has tons of online resources to get you started on the right path.

You’ll get the hang of everything, then look back and be so grateful that you are a warrior. Countless other ostomates will tell you the same thing. That is, when they’re not busy living an incredible life they wouldn’t have otherwise.

You got this!

 

Robin Glover is a writer based in the Houston area. He has a permanent ostomy after being diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease in 2017.

This event has passed but you can view it below. “This is My Life Now: A Patient Guide to Advocacy” By ConvaTec featuring UOAA Advocates.

Join ConvaTec for a live discussion with ostomates, nurses and other healthcare professionals at their two-session, one-day virtual summit on Friday, October 1, 2021.

“Ostomates’ Rights Are Human Rights – anytime and anywhere” is this year’s World Ostomy Day theme, which is why ConvaTec is bringing together ostomates, nurses and caregivers to lead open discussions that will be patient rights-focused fostering awareness, education, and advocacy.  Together we will have conversations that matter!

The Patient Summit will be broken into two sessions:

Session 1, 1pm EST: This Is My Life Now: A Patient’s Guide to Advocacy:

Joanna Burgess, BSN, RN, CWOCN. Is a WOC Nurse at Convatec and is Co-Chair of UOAA’s Advocacy Committee

Jeanine Gleba, MEd., UOAA Advocacy Manager

Ellyn Mantell is a UOAA Advocate, Author and Ostomy Support Group Leader.

Did you know that by knowing your patient rights and feeling empowered and exercising those rights – you can take those situations where you felt down and make it positive. Think, “This is MY life now. I have the right to be me.”

Learn about your local and international ostomy support resources, understand your patient rights, and feel empowered to exercise those rights in this session.

Scheduled panelists:

• Ellyn Mantell (United States), UOAA Advocate, Ostomy Support Group Leader

• Jeanine Gleba (United States), United Ostomy Associations of America, Advocacy Manager

• Joanna Burgess (United States), WOCN, ConvaTec me+™ Nurse, UOAA Advocacy Committee Co-Chair

 

Session 2, 3pm EST: Creating a Healthy Bond: Healthcare Support for Your Patients:

Allison Rosen is UOAA’s World Ostomy Day Champion, a colorectal cancer advocate and Ostomy Support Team Member at MD Anderson.

Healthy bonds in life are all around us. But there may be times it feels difficult to bond. Do you know, or do your patients know, about the resources available for support? Whether that is support with a nutritionist so they can learn about fiber intake, or with an exercise therapist to get guidance on hernia prevention. It could even be the support a therapist can provide navigating new emotions in your personal relationships. There are healthy bonds that can be built between an ostomate and their healthcare professionals.

Create a strong bond with your patients and healthcare providers. Get to know the different types of pre and post-operative support available.

Scheduled panelists:

• Lorena Eltz (Brazil), Patient Advocate

• Lorraine Grover (United Kingdom), Psychosexual Nurse Specialist

• Allison Rosen (United States), United Ostomy Associations of America- World Ostomy Day Champion

 

Editor’s note: This blog is from ConvaTec, Platinum Sponsor of the 2021 Run for Resilience Ostomy 5k. This event raises ostomy awareness and helps fund the services and programs of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

 

Written by: Brenda Elsagher, Director of Affiliated Support Group (ASG) Affairs, United Ostomy Association of America

Support. I’m not talking about my bra, although it could win an Oscar for a supporting role! I’m talking about the kind of encouragement you get from knowing another person with an ostomy.

I freaked out when I was 39 and had to have a colostomy. I wanted a point of reference and needed to talk to someone who had a stoma. I wanted to know what to expect; I wanted to prepare my body and mind for the changes coming my way. There was no internet and no social media. I didn’t even know there was any other kind of ostomy besides a colostomy.

My Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Nurse (WOCN) was a great source of comfort. She calmly explained, without horror, that excrement (OK, I think she actually said “stool” – and I wouldn’t have used either of those words) would be coming out of my abdomen and into a bag that would somehow adhere to my body.

She made it sound like it would become so natural, as if I was adding a quart of milk to my shopping list. No big deal. You’ll get this in no time at all. And she said all of this with a confident smile – a genuine one, not a fake one like when people are trying to help you through something awful. I felt she meant it! So, I let myself believe her.

During one of my subsequent visits to her office, I saw a newsletter that listed a meeting time for people living with ostomies. I went to the meeting, and realized that this was my tribe. For many attendees, these gatherings were the only ostomy support they had, other than their loved ones who tried to understand but could never quite get it. Besides, here were people I could eat a meal with while talking about changing ostomy pouches. You can’t do that with every crowd! I met life-long friends at those meetings, and that was an unexpected perk.

Then I heard of a conference, the United Ostomy Associations of America (UOAA) national conference, where people came from all over the USA, and some from Canada and other countries too. It featured classes, social events, great speakers, and time to get to know more people with ostomies. A young man I talked to recently told me that he met someone at the 2009 conference who changed his life and made all the difference. If we only knew the power of a quiet conversation and how its impact can be phenomenal. We can be a resource for one another. That’s why I suggest regular telephone check-ins or video calls with UOAA Affiliated Support Groups (ASGs), because both can play a crucial role in helping someone feel connected.

I also found information galore and updates on the latest innovative technology for people with ostomies in The Phoenix magazine (the official publication of the UOAA), which still exists today. Not long after, I got America Online (AOL) and felt like I was on the forefront of technology. I had a computer, and now the internet. Imagine horns blasting – my world opened up and the exchange of information worldwide was awesome. Even more ways to communicate! A woman in Colorado who read my book, “If the Battle is Over, Why am I Still In Uniform,” emailed me, decided to get a colonoscopy, and was spared from cancer. That is a satisfying feeling, to know you gave up a year of your life to write a book and it saved another.

I began to speak across the USA. Who would have thought that 25 years later I am still talking about bowels and butts, or dare I say the lack of them in some cases? The people I have met, the conversations I have had, the opportunities that have come my way – all because I chose to meet with a small group of people. That experience led to an abundance of support, not only for me but for others I know with ostomies or continent diversions, because of all that we shared. Some shared their misery, some shared their success, and some listened, learned, and began to feel that they could deal with their situations. Finding the group was life enhancing, and even life-saving in many cases. I kept coming to help others, but have been helped in return many times over. A phrase that I often heard at the meetings was, “Someone reached out to me in the hospital, and I want to do the same.”

In my new role as the UOAA Director of ASG Affairs, I have come full circle as a volunteer. I meet so many people across the USA that are actively reaching out to others, and helping them on their paths to recovery of mind, body, and spirit. I am their cheerleader. Sometimes I can offer a suggestion or teach them how to use Zoom to stay connected. I have always known that the UOAA had our backs but I have now found so many more resources on their website that I never knew existed. There are over 300 ostomy support groups in the USA for people with ostomies and continent diversions. And for people who don’t like to go to group meetings, there is an individual membership too that gives them full access to an abundance of resources.

There is no right way or wrong way to have an ostomy. You don’t have to shout it out to the world, but there also is no reason to be ashamed about it. I honor your privacy, and thank you for honoring my desire to be public. Both are good. We are alive and grateful!

 

This article originated in the Hollister Secure Start services eNewsletter. For more ostomy resources at your fingertips, subscribe here.

Brenda Elsagher is an author, international speaker, and comedian, and also volunteers with the UOAA. She has been living well with an ostomy for 25 years. Find out more about Brenda at www.livingandlaughing.com, and follow her on Facebook @BrendaElsagher. 

Financial Disclosure: Brenda Elsagher received compensation from Hollister Incorporated for her contribution to this article.

 

Editor’s note: This article is from one of our digital sponsors, Hollister Incorporated. Sponsor support along with donations from readers like you help to maintain our website and the free trusted resources of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

My name is Katie Lee, and I was diagnosed with stage 1 rectal cancer at age 33, only eight months after the birth of my second child. My tumor was […]

In celebration of Wound, Ostomy, and Continence (WOC) Nurse Week 2021, help us to shine a bright light on these special nurses. They give us the hope, support, and specialized care needed to thrive in life with an ostomy.

WOC nurse volunteers spend countless hours advocating, leading support groups, educating, fundraising, and supporting UOAA programs and services. UOAA recognizes that not all ostomy patients have access to a WOC nurse and we’ll continue to advocate for access to a specialized ostomy nurse from preoperatively when your stoma site is marked through an ongoing lifetime continuum of care as outlined in our Ostomy and Continent Diversion Patient Bill of Rights.

We asked UOAA’s social media community to share how a WOC nurse has made a difference in your life, health, or support group. We hope more nurses will consider this rewarding specialty. Thank you WOC nurses, you are our guiding lights.

I would like to thank my WOC nurses who have and continue to support me as an ostomate. My nurses inspired me so much I went to nursing school and graduate this month with a BSN and plan on continuing on. To become a WOC nurse myself! Thank you WOC nurses! -Katie Lee

“My WOC was a lady named Gayle. She helped my Mom so much with me. I remember many visits to the ER ward and having her there. She was funny, nice and on it. I used to love seeing her. She stayed by my side from 3-6yr old into my adulthood. She fought hard to find a bag that was the perfect fit for me. She got a new product in and it changed my life significantly, she fought tooth and nail to keep me in that bag, even when Canada decided to stop offering it openly. I still wear that brand to this day. I always heard rumors she was also an Ostomate and I can’t say how long. That made me love her more. I will never forget those who had a hand in my welfare and saw me through their entire career. I miss her and the others immensely. Jody is my new WOC and although I rarely need her, she’s there to help, even if it’s a panic situation that couldn’t wait for an appointment.” –Camille C.

“Joanna Burgess Happy WOC Nurse week. You have been a true Angel of Mercy for me over the years!” –Col Justin Blum

“My son’s WOC nurses at CHLA were awesome!!” – Teri C.

I am a WOCN and worked with MANY ostomy patients in the past. The thanks go both ways — I have never (in a long nursing career) felt as appreciated for my clinical skills and assistance as I do when working with people with an ostomy. They are the reason I have stayed in nursing. -Cris R.

This is Karen with my husband at his 55th birthday party in 2019 -Pam Allen Williamson

We have 3 great WOC nurses in our community that come to our ostomy support meetings Karen Eubank, Michael Byars and Jason Pratt. Michael went above and beyond by creating a weekly outpatient ostomy clinic after I told him I learned some cities had those while attending a UOAA conference. Karen who has been coming to our meetings for over a decade, hosts many of our support group parties at her house, works at the ostomy clinic on a regular basis, pays to store donated supplies and often helps people after hours. Both of them visit my husband when he is hospitalized, came to the house to visit him when he was home on hospice and came to his funeral. We are extra grateful to Karen because before he left the hospital on hospice she applied a special high output bag connected to bed drainage bag to minimize the family’s need to interact with the ostomy. Karen who is a neighbor told me that she would come change the bag twice a week. The hospice nurse was fascinated and stayed late to watch Karen change it out. He was going to stay in the hospital as long as they would let him to avoid family having to deal with his bag because he had always been so independent with it until nearly the end. Karen’s solution allowed him to come home and be surrounded by family caregivers that loved him and have wonderful conversations remembering fun times and having important conversations instead of the visitor limitations hospitals right now. We are so grateful to her for this and hope it will benefit other families of bed-bound patients. BTW we still fondly remember my husband’s first WOCN Nurse Licklighter who was a nurse at Keesler AFB in 1993. She marked him before surgery and taught him how to handle his bag and he kept her handwritten instructions forever and sometimes copied them for others. -Pam A.W.

I can’t thank the nurses at Ohio Health Riverside Hospital they helped me so much and made an otherwise difficult transition quite non traumatic! –Carol B.

Thank you to Erin and Vanessa at New York Presbyterian! –Jameson Cycz

The ConvaTec nurse Lorelei. She has been a stoma saver. She helped me troubleshoot my leaking problem, got me into a new pouching system, that is awesome and when I ran out of samples and am in limbo with my supply company in getting the new pouches and other supplies, she set me up with a holdover supply, so that my stoma won’t be continuously injured by my current pouches.- Susan Gentner

I’m thankful for all of the WOCNs I have been to. Some I’ve known for many years. They are very knowledgeable and helpful with various products.I also want to give a shoutout to our great WOCNs at 11 Health & Technologies for being amazing for our team and patients. ? –Megan Alloway

Amazing Aimee Frisch. The best WOCN in know. Love you. -John Pederson

Happy ‪#WOCNurseWeek2021! What you do for ostomy patients and the impact you make is immeasurable!  Plus we are grateful for all that you do to support UOAA and our advocacy program! You are advocates for patients and can influence change. Shine on! @UOAA_Advocate -Jeanine Gleba

By Ellyn Mantell

Welcome to my fantasy.

We all have our fantasies, so come along with me as I describe one of mine…new ostomates (those with ileostomy, colostomy or urostomy, all having had stoma surgery) would begin their adjustment to their new life with all of their questions answered, they would have knowledge and be welcomed into an Ostomy Support Group, they would have a connection with a Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Nurse (WOCN) and they would recognize what a gift, what a lifesaver an ostomy is.

My concern is that this is not the usual for ostomates, either new or even those who have them for many years. In New Jersey, particularly where I live, there are many resources available, and yet, even in our sophisticated arena, many ostomates leave the hospital uninformed and underserved. Prior to Covid-19, I visited patients in the hospital or in rehab facilities to answer their questions. I brought journals and pens so they could write their emotions, concerns, and observations, and refer back to their notes as they made progress. I am so anxious to return to that important undertaking as soon as it is safe to do so.

When I had my surgery in March of 2014, my surgeon told me I would be in the hospital for 5-7 days. However, I felt so well, so quickly, that I was able to leave 4 days later. That was pushing the envelope, but I was so used to recovering from abdominal surgeries, having had 22 before that, my ability to go into recovery mode was well-entrenched. The majority of patients need so much more time, and now, even 4 days is more than they are offered.

Back to my fantasy, and my pipe dream of a great transition for new ostomates:

How can questions be answered, and knowledge gained as needed? 

The majority of ostomies, even those performed in an emergent situation, require marking the abdomen for placement of the stoma (opening.) That is typically done by the Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Nurse (WOCN) and that is the person who comes to the patient’s room post-op to begin to prepare the ostomate for life at home. In an ideal world, the WOC nurse has written information to share, which once home, will make more sense, and provides contact information for any questions. Additionally, the ostomate is put in touch with the United Ostomy Associations of America to become part of a bigger group of kindred people.

How do we find Ostomy Support Groups in our area?

I am involved in three Support Groups, becoming president of one already formed when I had my ileostomy, and then worked with WOC nurses at two other hospitals in the area to form new ones. Until Covid hit, these were growing so nicely. But we are meeting virtually now, and staying as close as possible, knowing that the day will come when we are back together. It is wonderful to see “my people” who share my concerns, experiences and fears and accomplishments. We help each other in countless ways. People reach out to me through the WOC nurses in the area, United Ostomy Associations of America, The Phoenix Magazine, the American Cancer Society, three hospitals, and through word of mouth. Because I am so open and revealing about my ileostomy and Lily, my stoma, I believe my name pops into the minds of people when they know someone in need.

Ostomies are Lifesavers! “Read all about it!”

An ostomy provides the gift of health for many, many medical situations, including cancer, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, diverticulitis, motility issues and devastating organ injury. We live in good times for our supplies and the ability to try new and innovative appliances and accessories. The Phoenix Magazine is a great resource for all, and assists in wading through the confusion many feel. Motivational stories and practical guidance round out the offerings.

A final word about those we call our Angels…the Wound and Ostomy Nurses.

Establish a relationship with one, and if there is an Ostomy Clinic or Ostomy Center in your area, use it! These nurses are your connection to properly-fitting appliances, the correct supplies and accessories, questions and personal support, as well as the ability to refer to a Support Group. More and more are entering the private sector and providing services such as home visits, particularly to those who cannot travel to a clinic or office, and your surgeon may even have one in the office to help navigate the transition to life as an ostomate. We call our WOC nurses our Angels, and that is exactly what they are, ladies and gentlemen with big wings to support us!

 

Ellyn Mantell is a UOAA advocate and Affiliated Support Group leader from New Jersey. You can follow her personal blog at morethanmyostomy

Barbara Dale, RN, CWOCN, CHHN, COS-C
Director of WOC Services at Quality Home Health
Jeanine Gleba UOAA Advocacy Manager

I am a Wound, Ostomy, Continence (WOC) nurse in a rural home health agency. I have worked in the home health field since 2001. Many times when I visit patients in their homes, they complain about the lack of knowledgeable ostomy nurses in the facility (e.g., hospital) they came from or even from my own agency.  I try to explain to them that ostomy care is specialized and in general nurses don’t get much (if any) training in nursing school for this type of medical condition. I compare this with my own lack of IV education and skills since I rarely do labs or port flushes and have lost many of my previous skills. We can’t all know everything about all aspects of medical care and not every agency has access to an ostomy trained or ostomy certified medical provider. Nonetheless, it is the home health agency’s responsibility when they accept you as a patient to provide you the care you need and deserve. You have a right to quality care.

Are you aware of the patient bill of rights (PBOR) for persons with an ostomy or continent diversion? United Ostomy Associations of America (UOAA) developed the PBOR in 1977 and revised it in 2017. The PBOR is designed so that you can know what to expect and what is reasonable for you to ask for when you receive care. If you haven’t already looked over the PBOR, please take time to familiarize yourself. In addition, if you use ostomy or urological supplies, here is what you should understand and expect when receiving medical care in your home.

Be Prepared

Be prepared in advance to take appropriate steps to ensure you receive quality ostomy care.  As you prepare for discharge to home after your ostomy surgery, ask your case manager to make sure your home health agency has a certified ostomy nurse. This will also be important if you are a person already living with an ostomy with a new medical condition (such as hip surgery or a stroke).  Your home health nurse should re-evaluate your ostomy care. For example, someone with arthritis may have lost dexterity and now needs to switch to a different type of pouching application system or you may have gained or lost some weight over the hospitalization (which can change your abdominal contours and your stoma) and now your current system doesn’t give you 2-5 days wear time anymore.

Change Agencies if Needed

If you are already home and your home health agency does not have a certified ostomy nurse, then request that they consult with one to ensure that you receive the proper optimal care. I often get phone calls or emails from colleagues who work for other agencies asking me ostomy questions or asking if I can come to see their patient. We are all in this together and we all want what is best for the patient, which is YOU! Don’t be afraid to ask for an ostomy nurse!

You may even have to change agencies. It isn’t difficult even though your current agency will likely not want you to change.  You have a right to explain that you must receive your care from a certified ostomy nurse and your current agency, unfortunately, does not provide this type of care. All you have to do is call the agency YOU choose and tell them you want to transfer your care to their agency. Typically the new agency will contact your doctor or ask you to let your doctor know you want to change agencies. The new agency will then inform your current home health agency that they are taking over your care.  

What to do if an Ostomy Nurse is Still Not Available?

If all else fails and for whatever reason you have a home health agency without access to a certified ostomy nurse, you still have resources.  You can:

  • Go to www.wocn.org and look up a patient referral for an ostomy nurse in your area. This content also usually includes contact information for the WOC Nurse in your area.
  • Visit www.ostomy.org for educational resources such as the New Ostomy Patient Guide and UOAA has a dedicated webpage specifically for Ostomy Health Care Resources.
  • Use social media to find others that may be in the same situation as you. There are a multitude of Facebook pages/groups for ostomates with WOC nurses who follow these groups and offer comments or suggestions when specifically asked.

In Conclusion

We cannot say this enough: YOU have a right to quality care and deserve quality care. Know your rights. You deserve to be able to live your life to the fullest with your new or established ostomy.

Patients and medical professionals can work together to improve patient outcomes. If you want to help UOAA drive change and achieve ostomy quality of care improvements for patients while under home care, please print and share these resources with your home health agency: Achieve 5 Star Ostomy Home Health Care and Important Reminders for Home Health Providers Treating People with an Ostomy.

They are all superheroes in our book. They come in on their day off for us, they heal us, they teach us, they empower us, they advocate for us, they volunteer for us, they learn for us, they run our support groups, they make us laugh and help dry our tears.

They are also a central part of UOAA’s 7th National Conference and our advocacy program. Every year we ask our UOAA Affiliated Support Groups to nominate an exemplary nurse for UOAA’s WOC Nurse of the Year Award.

Charlotte Popovich, center, was awarded last year’s WOC Nurse of The Year.

April 14-20, 2019 marks WOC Nurse Appreciation Week hosted by the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society™ (WOCN®). This year WOCN® Society is celebrating and empowering WOC nurses to discover the superhero that lives within them.

This celebration is a fitting time for us to begin our challenge of selecting a winner in a group that are all heroes. We know many still hide in the shadows and their good deeds remain unrecognized.

Prepare to be inspired by these testimonials from our Affiliated Support Groups who nominated this year’s amazing group of nurses.

Shirley Abraham
Ostomy Support Group at Baylor University Medical Center in Texas

Shirley has been passionately involved in the Baylor University Medical Center (BUMC) Ostomy Support Group since its inception. As a member of the founding committee, she was instrumental in inaugurating the new and much needed support group in October 2018. BUMC is a large hospital with a substantial number of colorectal and urological surgery patients, and the need for such a support group was very evident. She works closely with the surgeons to provide a smooth discharge and post-operative recovery transition. She also works in Baylor’s out-patient ostomy clinic, serving patients with peristomal problems or pouching issues.

“She is well respected as an expert in her field, dedicated to her field and passionate about the quality of care that she delivers. She is a true example of a highly dedicated RN and skilled WOC nurse”

Janice Beitz
Philadelphia Ostomy Association

For close to 20 years Janice has been asking the Philadelphia Ostomy Association to periodically come speak to her WOC nursing class. We have never appeared at her class where the students haven’t thanked us for our time and loved the opportunity to speak to people with ostomies. The trickledown effect of being invited by Janice to speak at her WOC nursing class is that her students graduate and the ones that stay local to this area call us to visit their patients.

“Her strongest attribute would have to be her commitment to her student’s, UOAA as a support system that provides Information to patients and a Patient Visiting Service where ostomates visit patients pre and post op to assist in the rehabilitation of new ostomates in getting on with their lives by showing them they can still work, dress in stylish clothes, and basically live a relatively normal life after surgery.”

Erin Donohoe
Ileostomy Association of New York, Inc.

Erin distributes monthly meeting flyers to clients and family members who may benefit from our meetings, and posts meeting notices in a prominent location on the hospital floor. She participates in Board of Directors meetings and is on Ileostomy Association of New York’s (IANY’s) medical advisory board. Erin is available for contact by e-mail or phone if urgent situation/question arises. She has been willing to provide her services to home-bound ostomates and has been flexible regarding her fees for home visits. She has often provided these services gratis for patients in need.

“Erin has exhibited a high degree of professionalism and commitment befitting a representative of the WOC nurse profession. She is a strong advocate for IANY and believes in the positive impact that mutual support groups can confer. Since our BOD and general meetings are held on Sunday afternoons, she willingly sacrifices precious personal time to be present. She consistently shows compassion, understanding to persons with ostomies and their significant others who approach her for help and assistance.

Diana Gallagher
North West Arkansas Ostomy Support Group

Diana started the group over ten years ago. It started out in a small room with about eight patients. It is because of her compassion, ability to educate and availability to both patients and doctors that our group has grown to a base of about 140 patients. We have patients that still come after ten years knowing they can always learn something new. Diana has extended our group hours for patients in need of education and information. Diana has a very prominent presence, and doctors and surgeons across the area rely on her expertise.

“Diana has a patients wellbeing in mind both physically and mentally. She is a constant in our ostomy community that is willing to help any ostomy patient. She is an advocate for patients!” 

Joy Hooper
Ostomy 2-1-1 inc. and South Georgia Ostomy Association

As the only support group in South Georgia, Joy will make home visits to help patients in rural areas as well as bigger cities. She will teach patients everything about caring for their ostomy. She opened an office where patients can get one-on-one care. She helps others find solutions to their problems. Joy will call and talk to any doctor or nurse interested in ostomy care. She travels around the country to teach ostomy care to other nurses.

“Joy Hooper is the most dedicted ostomy nurse. She invented an anatomical apron for helping patients understand their ostomy. She has so much knowledge about ostomy and will teach anyone who wants to know. Joy is a wonderful ostomy nurse and someone I can call on anytime day or night.”  

“Her LIFE is focused around not just our single ASG, but the entire Ostomy community. I would have to say that every attribute and commitment that Joy provides are CRUCIAL for not only our group, but to every other group in the ostomy WORLD.”

Charles Sloan
Boulder County Ostomy Support Group of Colorado

We have meetings in two different hospitals and Charles attends meetings in both facilities, even those that take place in the evening after he is off work. He makes time at the ostomy clinic for support group patients even when they have a full schedule. Charles developed a program for high school students and an in-house education program for the staff at his hospital to educate them in best practices at the bedside of ostomy patients. Charles is passionate about ostomies and designed WOC pins for those who complete his in-house ostomies 101 class. He also designed fun trading cards used for training programs.

“Our group takes a great deal of comfort knowing that Charles is always there for us. If there is an emergency we all know how to contact him and he will provide support.”

Angela Natale-Ryan, Stephanie D’Andrea, Ronnie Funke, Pam Hughes
Union County Ostomy Support Group of New Jersey

This group of four dedicated nurses interface with new members of the support group, and educates medical professionals on the importance of our visiting program. They have established our first Ostomy Center and attend meetings. From the moment I was marked my WOC nurse has been beside me and encouraged me to attend my first support group. In four years we have grown to a UOAA chapter with many members.

Our four WOC nurses are such a cohesive and dependable group of women who concur, coordinate and ensure that all ostomates are treated completely, they are determined to offer the best to all of us. They are problem solvers who never give up until all patients are comfortable. Ostomates are in the best hands possible with the four of them, who act as one!

United Ostomy Associations of America’s (UOAA) 2019 WOC Nurse of the Year Award will be presented during its 7th National Conference in Philadelphia this August.

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The Southeast Region (SER) of the WOCN® Society is actively planning their Annual Conference from September 22-24, 2022 at the Sheraton Hotel Birmingham Jefferson Convention Complex located in Birmingham, Alabama.  They are committed to providing a safe, enjoyable and productive event. CLICK HERE to learn more about the Conference and continued updates as they become available.

 

The SER of the WOCN® Society Board is actively planning their 44th Annual Conference from August 26-28, 2021 at the Rosen Centre Hotel in Orlando, Florida. They are committed to providing a safe, enjoyable and productive event. CLICK HERE to learn more about the Conference and continued updates as they become available.