Hollister is proud to support World Ostomy Day! In partnership with United Ostomy Associations of America (UOAA), Hollister Incorporated is proud to stand with the entire ostomy community in celebration. Here are some ways you can learn something new, show your support, or connect with others in the global ostomy community.

Tune in to a Virtual Panel Discussion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hollister has joined up with their sister brand based in Europe, Dansac, to bring you a virtual panel conversation with ostomates from around the world about their experiences and how they engage with the ostomy community. Tune in for a great conversation! Sign up for a reminder, and to submit a question for the Q&A.

Order Your Stoma Sticker

Stoma stickers are a great way to raise awareness, start a conversation, or show support. Order your free Stoma Stickers in time for World Ostomy Day, shipped anywhere in the US.

Share a photo or video of your Stoma Sticker on social media using #StomaSticker to be part of the conversation. Or show off your Stoma sticker while running the virtual Run for Resilience Ostomy 5K and share how you celebrated #WOD2021.

Share your #OstomateVoices and personalize your next Instagram or Facebook Stories with Hollister digital stickers. Search for them in the GIF library when creating an Instagram or Facebook Story and you’ll find a whole new collection.

Start Listening to #MyOstomy Podcast

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Join Eve, Chris, Kelly, Ed, Gill, and Alice as they describe their challenges and breakthroughs with illness, symptom management, mental well-being, pregnancy, workplace conversations, and more in this limited run series. Each conversation helps to shine a light on the lived experience of illness, the positive impact stoma surgery can have, and the power of every person living with a stoma. Learn more

For more resources and interactive ways to get involved, visit Hollister.com/worldostomyday.

 

Editor’s note: This article is from Hollister Incorporated, Diamond Sponsor of the 2021 Run for Resilience Ostomy 5k. This event raises ostomy awareness and helps fund the services and programs of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

A research study about the benefits of perioperative self-management support for ostomates

 

Ostomates are not only dealing with intestinal concerns but are also at risk for a multitude of complications. Data shows that 38% of ostomy patients find themselves back in the emergency room or being admitted within the first 90 days post operatively [1]. This is one of the highest rates of readmission when compared to other types of surgery. The most common cause for re-admission is dehydration, at approximately 40% of post ileostomy readmissions [2]. We also know that 84% of ostomy patients develop skin issues. The causes of these can be chemical, mechanical, or microbial, and possibly avoidable. Ostomates also have significantly increased healthcare costs, especially when affected by peristomal skin complications, and leakage [2]. It is known that 25% of ostomates develop renal failure within two years. The complications these patients encounter require 7x more outpatient visits than the average patient. And 29.1% of ostomates experience readmission which costs approximately $16,000 per patient [1]. These statistics show that specialized care for these patients is imperative to improving patient outcomes in this patient population.

A recent study published by the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons shows how one company, 11 Health and Technologies, is utilizing a novel care approach to improve the quality of life and outcomes in this type of patient. The company developed alfred: SmartCare, a unique care model designed to meet the specialized need of ostomates. The program consists of a SmartBag and SmartWafer, mobile application, patient coaches (who were/are also ostomates, trained to support this type of patient) and the nursing team. The patient wears the SmartBag and SmartWafer, which submits data to the mobile application and clinical dashboard. The data is visible to the patient, their coach, the nursing team and the patient’s clinicians to be used to identify trends and abnormalities in the values. The patient can see how much output they have expressed and what the temperature is of their peristomal skin. These data points can help to curtail oncoming hydration issues or infections. When abnormalities are identified, the coach can work with the patient to provide education and can escalate issues to the nursing team for medical guidance.

In the study, the outcomes of 66 new ostomates from 19 different states were monitored for the first 30 post-operative days. The study showed that close monitoring of ostomy output volume as well as perioperative self-management support can significantly reduce the rate of hospital readmissions in the first 30 days after ostomy surgery.

Patients and healthcare providers should be open to the use of innovative programs that use remote monitoring along with telehealth, as they can be beneficial in improving the outcomes of patients in the immediate post-operative period.

To read the full study, visit the Diseases of the Colon & Rectum online at: https://journals.lww.com/dcrjournal/Citation/2020/12000/Improved_30_Day_Surgical_Outcomes_in_Ostomates.17.aspx

Editor’s note: This article is from one of our digital sponsors, 11 Health and Technologies. Sponsor support along with donations from readers like you help to maintain our website and the free trusted resources of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

[1] Tyler, J. A., Fox, J.P., Dharmarajan, S., Silviera, M. L., Hunt, S. R., Wise, P. E., Mutch, M. G. (2014). Acute health care resource utilization for ileostomy patients is higher than expected. Diseases of the Colon & Rectum57(12), 1412-1420.

[2] Justiniano, C. F., Temple, L. K., Swanger, A. A., Xu, Z., Speranza, J. R., Cellini, C., Salloum, R. M., & Fleming, F. J. (2018). Readmissions With Dehydration After Ileostomy Creation: Rethinking Risk Factors. Diseases of the colon and rectum61(11), 1297–1305. https://doi.org/10.1097/DCR.0000000000001137

[3] Taneja, C., Netsch, D., Rolstad, B. S., Inglese, G., Eaves, D., Oster, G (2019). Risk and economic burden of peristomal skin complaints following ostomy surgery. Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing, 46(2), 143-149.

[4] Fearn, Robert I. M.D., M.R.C.P.1,2; Gorgun, Emre M.D.3; Sapci, Ipek M.D.3; Mehta, Saahil N. M.D.2; Dinh, Binh B.S.2; Yowell, Quinn V. M.S.2; Eisenstein, Samuel M.D.4 (2020). Improved 30-Day Surgical Outcomes in Ostomates Using a Remote Monitoring and Care Management Program: An Observational Study. Diseases of the Colon & Rectum: December 2020 – Volume 63 – Issue 12 – p e581-e586.

Saturday, October 3rd, 2020 marks the 10th anniversary of Ostomy Awareness Day. In partnership with United Ostomy Associations of America (UOAA), Hollister Incorporated is proud to stand with the entire ostomy community in celebration. Every ostomate has a voice worth hearing and we aim to embody ostomy confidence of our worldwide community with #OstomateVoices.

Spread Positivity and Share Your Voice

We’re connecting and empowering our worldwide ostomy community to share their own unique experiences—their challenges, their achievements and the joys of their daily lives. Share your words of encouragement that have helped you along your ostomy journey. Your story might help someone who might be struggling. Using your words, we’ll create a unique social card that you can share with your friends, family, and community. Share your voice here!

Join Us for a Virtual Cooking Class

Join us for a virtual cooking class on October 3rd with private chefs Ryan Van Voorhis, a fellow ostomate, and Seth Bradley of Nude Dude Food™, one of Chicago’s most sought after private dining and catering services. Register today to connect with others in the community and cook a delicious meal. Register today!

For more resources on nutrition with an ostomy, check out UOAA’s Food Chart or download the “Eating with an Ostomy” Nutrition Guide.

Show Off Your Stoma Sticker

Stoma stickers are a great way to raise awareness, start a conversation, or show support. Order your free Stoma Stickers in time for Ostomy Awareness Day, shipped anywhere in the US.

Share a photo or video of your Stoma Sticker on social media using #StomaSticker to be part of the conversation. Or show off your Stoma sticker while running in your virtual Run for Resilience Ostomy 5K and share how you celebrated #OstomyDay2020.

Share your #OstomateVoices and personalize your next Instagram or Facebook Stories with the Hollister “Ostomate Voices” digital stickers. It’s easy – search “Ostomate Voices” in the GIF library when creating a Story and you’ll find the whole collection, including a UOAA lifesaver and Stoma Sticker!

For more resources and interactive ways to get involved, visit Hollister.com/ostomyawareness.

Editor’s Note: this blog post was provided by Hollister Inc. the exclusive Diamond Sponsor of UOAA’s annual Run for Resilience Ostomy 5K events that benefit UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

The Annual Run for Resilience Ostomy 5k is Coming to You!

 

It’s a good year to celebrate your life. To get outside in the fresh air and get moving again if you can. To speak out and make noise that “Ostomies Are Life-Savers” and not something to be stigmatized or feared.

To keep everyone safe and adhere to any local COVID-19 guidelines all Run for Resilience Ostomy 5k events are being held virtually this year. That just means you can run, walk or roll wherever you want (even inside on a treadmill) and still be a part of Ostomy Awareness Day activities on Saturday, October 3, 2020.

We’ll be celebrating an ostomy community that has shown resilience long before “resilience” became the buzz word of the year. With your registration for the Worldwide Virtual Ostomy 5k, we’ll mail you a race bib, unique 10th Anniversary Ostomy Awareness Day Race T-Shirt and special stickers and sponsor giveaways. If you want to show your state pride and live in Alabama, Arizona, North Carolina, Idaho, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Oregon/Washington please consider supporting your local “Virtual 5k event.” You may have the additional opportunity to pick-up a race bag along with the t-shirt and giveaways at a safe location organized by the local race directors. (MI Run participants T-Shirts, race bags and materials will be mailed.)

You don’t have to be a runner or walker to support these charity events. This event has traditionally been a critical fundraiser for UOAA and the advocacy, resources, and educational materials provided for anyone in need of ostomy or continent diversion surgery. The canceling of in-person events will be a fundraising challenge we’ll need help to overcome. 

Please consider donating or starting a fundraiser like Catherine Salisbury Catherine shared her inspiring story on the fundraising page she created on the Virtual Run Sign-Up website.  

I was diagnosed with a hereditary colon cancer disease, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP), in 2015. This diagnosis both saved and drastically changed my life. In 2016 I had a total proctocolectomy surgery with a temporary ostomy for three and a half months.  In 2019, desmoid tumors were constricting the blood flow to my j-pouch so I had to have it removed and had a permanent end-loop ileostomy created.  It has been an incredibly difficult journey, but I am beyond blessed with an amazing support system. My family and friends have kept me going through this whole crazy journey. I am beyond grateful for them.

I hope to raise money to help other ostomates who do not have the same incredible support team I have. -Catherine Salisbury

You may be surprised by how supportive others will be if you share your story and create a fundraiser. Catherine increased her fundraising goal to $1,000 after the response from her supportive friends and family helped her reach her original goal.

We also have incentive gifts featuring the “Ostomies Are Life-Savers” logo for those who reach goals of $250 and $400 and anyone who donates or raises $30 or more will receive a special bandana for themselves or their pet.

Starting a Group/Team is also a great way to connect with friends and family wherever they live so they can show support for your journey.  Groups of WOC nurses can claim bragging rights for regional participation (the team WOC This Way in Indiana is leading) and co-workers may have fun in challenging other departments. New this year we are excited that supporters of WOCN Society’s Fund the Future program are coming together for the We All Walk Together Team.

UOAA Affiliated Support Groups such as the one in DuPage County, Illinois looks forward to gathering members for a virtual event every year and are forging ahead with a team and fundraiser even as they anticipate COVID restrictions will not enable them to all meet up together at their usual park location. The year’s Exclusive Diamond Sponsor of the Ostomy 5k, Hollister Incorporated, is also planning another employee-wide event and we expect to hear about other sponsor events soon.

Ostomy Support Group of DuPage County at their Virtual Ostomy 5k in 2018, the group will be back this year with social distancing guidelines in mind.

For some extra motivation consider starting a couch to 5k training group with some friends to get ready and feel great in October. 

Wherever you choose to run or walk be sure to let others know about it to truly raise ostomy awareness. Take pictures of yourself doing your virtual race and email them to us or share/tag them with our public Facebook page. Hashtag your photos or stories #RunforResilience and we may repost on Twitter or Instagram.

We are very grateful for our national sponsors who help offset the costs of the events and believe in this mission. They have stepped up during this difficult year and remain committed to this event and the cause of ostomy awareness. 

Rally your friends, co-workers, and family to the cause of ostomy awareness. People are still choosing death over life with an ostomy and it’s up to you to help show the world what people living with an ostomy are really capable of.  

 

Register for a virtual event near you or for the worldwide Virtual 5k. Sign-up before 9/11/20 and save up to $5. The special price of $17.50 includes a special 10th anniversary of Ostomy Awareness Day technical t-shirt (Michigan is $22.50 shipping included). Worldwide Virtual Event Registration is recommended for those not near one of our local virtual events t-shirt packet pick-up locations.

Click Here to Register

Click Here to Donate or Start a Fundraiser

By Ed Pfueller, UOAA Communications and Outreach Manager

In-person peer support has always been at the heart of UOAA. Though people worldwide now routinely connect online with others living with an ostomy, the in-person experience of UOAA’s over 300 Affiliated Support Groups continues to endure and grow year after year.

The arrival of COVID-19 is challenging groups to maintain continuity after often decades of holding a routine meeting schedule. Ostomates new and old continue to need support during this time and video conferencing technology is making this happen. Zoom meetings have emerged as the platform of choice as our world strives for human connection during this period of isolation.

The South Texas Ostomy Support Group has been ahead of the curve and before this current crisis was already live-streaming with Zoom meetings as an option to in-person attendance. “Now that we are not able to meet up, we are still using the same meeting ID (link) but now that’s our only form of meeting,” says group president Christine Miller.

Christine recognizes that some may struggle to adapt to the new technology. “I made sure it was in the newsletter so those who needed help could call me and I could walk them through how to use Zoom prior to the meeting started. I had several calls the day of. It was exciting that we had so many people participate (10 people logged on). It was much less than a normal meeting but it was still heart-warming that they were still participating. We even had a newbie come! It was fun having her because she mentioned some of her problems and I immediately texted our Coloplast rep who jumped on for 15 minutes and became a very last-minute speaker for us.”

The Morris County New Jersey Ostomy Association, which has been in existence for over 40 years, is another group adapting to the times. UOAA Treasurer and the ASG’s board member George Salamy says that, after a trial to test for bugs, he and newsletter editor and webmaster Walter Cummins sent a broadcast email telling everyone they wanted to do a Zoom call.

“On April 15th around 23 people signed on with no issues. It was a mixture of older members and a few younger members, some with spouses, and our group’s WOC nurse,” George reports. “The original purpose of the call was to see how everyone was doing and if they needed anything. Everyone seemed to be okay. We talked about if there were any issues in obtaining products. I indicated UOAA works with the manufacturers and determined there were no manufacturing issues.” George adds, “People talked about shopping, which grocery stores were stocked, and some sanitary things we should all be doing (closing the toilet seat before flushing to eliminate germs). All in all, it went well. One member, who now lives in Florida, signed on and contributed much to the call. We decided to do this in May and will continue if needed. It’s a great way of keeping the members engaged.” After the meeting, members commented and made suggestions about future topics such as; the depression aspects of this “lock-down,” yoga, sound therapy for relaxing, and suggestions on where to shop and which stores had supplies.

Bob Baumel of the Ostomy Association of North Central Oklahoma sees potential in the virtual meetings because the organization’s meetings rotate between locations. “It will be interesting to see how Zoom works for our group. We may actually get better attendance using Zoom than we’ve been getting with physical meetings, considering that members who don’t feel well enough to travel to meetings, or who live far from our meeting locations of Stillwater and Ponca City, may nevertheless join meetings which are conducted electronically. Maybe we’ll like Zoom so much that we decide to continue holding some meetings with Zoom, even after the Coronavirus pandemic is over,” Bob says.

Liz Hiles of the Greater Cincinnati Ostomy Association has already hosted several Zoom calls for her group and hopes participation will increase. “I like the option on a number of levels and hadn’t previously considered it. I need to learn more about how to conduct and make it more productive. I like it for the younger folks who may be on the go or traveling. Though that could also apply to older populations too. I also like it for those that may be homebound or in a facility for whatever reason. Hospital, rehab, nursing etc.” Liz also organized a Zoom call for a group of young adults who all connected at last year’s UOAA National Conference and have tried to stay in touch on Facebook ever since.

Remember even if you have never attended a UOAA support and information group in the past you can always reach out and call a local leader nearby you for support. If they are not holding virtual meetings and you are familiar with the technology, perhaps ask if they need a volunteer like you to help them set it up for the group. Use whatever technology you and your group are comfortable with.

You can also use a landline to call into the group to chat, if you don’t have a smartphone or a camera on your computer. Zoom offers a free version if your group does not want to invest in a professional account. Members will just need to log back in when the meeting time hits its 40-minute limit. In recent weeks Zoom has responded to privacy concerns and it is suggested to use the password option for added security. Also, the Federal Trade Commission recently shared guidelines on staying safe while video conferencing.

This is a time for all of us to reach out and make sure our community is safe and supported. Although we are apart for safety, we can still remain connected and together.

The ostomy community is understandably very concerned about how the COVID-19 outbreak is affecting their daily lives, health, support networks, and access to ostomy supplies.

In this time of great uncertainty, UOAA recommends all individuals consult with their own primary care physicians with questions concerning their risk factor or if they exhibit any symptoms. Please follow the Center for Disease Control (CDC) website for actual up to date information. We recognize that many people living with an ostomy or continent diversion are older people and those with chronic disease and are therefore at higher risk of developing serious illness. Please also see CDC guidelines for people at risk

UOAA is also hearing from many Affiliated Support Groups who have prudently decided to cancel their upcoming meetings. Members should expect that their meetings will be canceled for the foreseeable future. Affiliated Support Groups are each independently run and members should contact their local leaders if they have any questions about their meetings. Community guidelines are also available from the CDC to assist leaders in deciding steps they should take to address public health concerns.  

UOAA reached out to the major ostomy manufacturers to see if the outbreak is currently impacting their production or supply chain. As of March 4, 2020 none of the manufacturers reported any issues in their operations as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak. Read our previous blog post for statements from individual manufacturers on this topic. Check with your distributor to see if there are any shipping delays due to increased demand of all goods at this time. 

If you develop a fever, cough and have difficulty breathing always contact your healthcare provider. They will determine if you are a candidate for a COVID-19 test. Medicare and private insurance should cover a test to see if you have coronavirus if requested from a physician. Additionally, Medicare is offering telemedicine options so people can stay home as much as possible during this crisis. Contact your private insurer to discover any additional benefits they may be offering at this time. For frequently asked questions and facts about this virus follow updates from the CDC on the latest COVID-19 guidelines.

UOAA will update this blog post with any information that may affect our community. 

By Jeanine Gleba, UOAA Advocacy Manager

The Digestive Disease National Coalition (DDNC) is an advocacy organization composed of the major national voluntary and professional societies concerned with digestive diseases. DDNC’s mission is to work cooperatively to improve access to and the quality of digestive disease health care to promote the best possible medical outcome and quality of life for current and future patients.  UOAA has been a member of this coalition for many years.

Each year the DDNC hosts a Spring Public Policy Forum. This year they celebrated their 30th anniversary! This special event was a two-day advocacy conference held  March 1-2, 2020 that brought together patient advocates, health care providers, and organizational members of coalition. Passionate and dedicated advocates traveled from 28 states all across the country and Washington DC. Over two days, attendees heard from multiple panels of leaders in the digestive disease community, attended a reception celebrating the coalition as well as its champions, and advocated for medical research and patient care on Capitol Hill. 

UOAA had five ostomates representing UOAA and the ostomy community. We are grateful that Lacee Harper, Rena Münster,  Michael Quear, Mollie Tinnin and Lynn Wolfson joined UOAA President, Susan Burns, and myself in Washington, DC. They spoke up about improving treatment for digestive diseases, shared their ostomy story and advocated for legislation such as the Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Act and the Safe Step Act. While mingling with attendees, we also had the pleasure of meeting a new ostomate advocate, Nancy Pedersen, and a mother of a young daughter with an ostomy, Jessi Richards, who was attending as a representative for the Megacystis Microcolon Intestinal Hypoperistalisis Syndrome (MMIHS) Foundation. We hope both of them will advocate with UOAA in the future.

UOAA Advocates at DDNCThe greatest take-away message from honorees and guest panelists was the impact we make on the Hill.  For example, it is truly because of patient advocates sharing their stories that we have seen increases in medical research funding. To give you a glimpse into my day on the Hill, I was on Team 6 with a surgeon from Nebraska and an IBD patient advocate from Connecticut.  I found we were met with very positive responses by legislator staffers in the Senate and House. In many cases, the offices we visited were already co-sponsors of the different legislation pieces and this occurred on both sides of the aisle.  They certainly all “got” the Safe Step Act and need for proper gluten labeling. When I followed up with my Congressional office (NJ Rep. Josh Gottheimer), they informed me that they have now signed on to the Medical Nutrition Equity Act (H.R.2501). Our visit and advocacy message resulted in a positive outcome!

New this year we advocated about non-medical switching as it relates to ostomy supplies.  It can take patients and their medical team quite a while to find the right “fit” ostomy pouching application system. However, we are finding for example that insurers in some cases are restricting consumers to specific brands, some suppliers switch outpatient preferred choice of products for non-medical reasons such as cost and patients are restricted to using a different brand such as a generic, which do not always have the same quality or reliability. Ostomy supplies are prosthetic devices and a person’s complete pouching system is customized for their unique stoma fit and individual needs. It is not okay for others to just switch that out!  We urged Congress to limit out-of-pocket costs and curb current and future payer tactics proactively.

UOAA will continue these advocacy efforts throughout the year. If you have experienced your supplies being switched out for non-medical reasons and it resulted in restricted access to your preferred products or an increase in your out-of-pocket costs or it negatively impacted your health or quality of life, submit your story HERE.

Updated: 4/10/20

The coronavirus is spreading around the world and some in the ostomy community are concerned if it will affect their access to ostomy supplies. UOAA reached out to the major ostomy manufacturers to see if the outbreak is currently impacting their production or supply chain. As of April 3, 2020 none of the manufacturers are currently reporting any issues in their operations as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.

As with any natural disaster personal preparation is key and there are many steps you can take now to be prepared for any unexpected impact in your life or community. For those who become ill or have a compromised immune system, always contact your physician with any concerns. If you are on Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) and become ill it covers a test to see if you have Coronavirus. For frequently asked questions and facts about this virus follow updates from the CDC on the latest COVID-19 guidelines.

These are the latest statements and information from leading ostomy product companies, they will be updated as needed.

11 Health

At 11 Health we understand that the challenges of COVID-19 extend beyond the needs of patients who are suffering from the virus. Our ostomy patients tell us that hospitals are cancelling their appointments and people are struggling to access their doctors and nurses; a big issue for people suffering from a chronic illness. That’s why we have launched our free 12 week remote patient monitoring Alfred SmartCare program to support ostomates using our patient coaches, tele-health nurses and dedicated app to provide a pro-active and preventative wellness program. We encourage you to visit us @ www.11health.com

With regard to access to supplies, we continue to safely manufacture and distribute. We currently have stocks in house of all Alfred SmartCare products and moving forward we do not anticipate any issues with smartbag supply.

 Hollister Incorporated Statement on the 2019 Novel Coronavirus

In response to the global health emergency concerning the spread of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19), Hollister Incorporated has taken steps to protect our Associates, and seeks to ensure that our customers experience no disruption to the supply of their products. Hollister is diligently cooperating with our suppliers across the globe to identify any potential impacts the coronavirus (COVID-19) may have on our suppliers as well as our own operations.
At this time, based on the information received to date, we do not anticipate an impact to our ability to supply or to our other business operations.
Hollister Incorporated continues to monitor this public health threat and considers the guidance provided by the World Health Organization, the US and European Centers for Disease Control and other sources in managing our overall ongoing response to this public health emergency.
We reassure you that we are taking appropriate measures to help ensure our customers, our Associates and our operations are cared for during this critical time. We continue to monitor the situation closely.
For additional inquiries, please contact corporate.communications@hollister.com.

3/24/20 Secure Start Services A Message from the Hollister Incorporated Family – COVID-19

Coloplast Statement

4/3/20

We hope you are doing well. We realize at this time, many of you may be dealing with lots of changes in your personal or family lives related to the COVID-19 outbreak. How can Coloplast® Care help you in this time of uncertainty? We aim to be the connection that builds your confidence in living with your intimate healthcare condition.
At this time, more than ever, assistance from Coloplast® Care may be more crucial as people stay home. The Coloplast Care team is still here for you, and we have extended our hours to six days a week to better support you.
Our Care Advisors are available by phone from 7 am to 7 pm Central Time, Monday – Friday and additionally 9 am to 1 pm Central Time on Saturdays
Here’s how to reach the Ostomy team

Call: 1-877-858-2656
E-mail: Care-us@Coloplast.com

We are here to support you with wellness information, product access information, and ostomy product samples. We also have some great educational resources for you available online, 24 x 7.

We have a number of educational resources available for you at our website, and encourage you to visit our resources: www.ostomy.coloplastcare.us

Concerns about access to supplies

We continue to safely manufacture and distribute our products. Currently, the COVID-19 outbreak is not impacting our ability to supply our ostomy and continence products, so we encourage you to continue to order your supplies as you regularly would.

At a time when many are concerned about receiving their medical supplies, Care Advisors can help coordinate product access by helping match you with product dealers who meet your insurance needs. If you are having trouble reaching your dealer or getting your medical supplies, please call us and we will ensure that you can continue to receive the products you need.

To read more about the initiatives that we have put in place globally and for updates related to the coronavirus, please visit our website. Let Coloplast Care be your reliable source of information for your intimate healthcare needs.

Kind regards,
Your Coloplast® team

ConvaTec Statement

At ConvaTec, we understand that the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) situation is impacting everyone. We’re doing our part to be socially responsible while still ensuring that our customers can contact us and receive the support they need.

To keep employees and customers safe, we’ve adjusted our work arrangements, including work from home where possible, to maintain social distancing.  As always, our me+ team of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Certified Nurses and product specialists are available, by phone or email, to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact our ConvaTec me+™ Support Team at 1-800-422-8811 (M-F, 8:30AM – 7:00 PM Eastern Time) or email cic@convatec.com.

ConvaTec Ostomy Care Global Impact
Our Ostomy products, whether produced by ConvaTec or in partnership with outsourced partners, are not manufactured in countries with high levels of reported cases of Coronavirus, this includes China. The situation is changing daily and therefore, ConvaTec has a dedicated team tasked with continually reviewing the situation, maintaining close collaboration with our suppliers and logistics partners, and communicating changes as the situation evolves.

Nu-Hope Statement

It is our recommendation that ostomates keep at least 1 box of spare pouches at all times. (This recommendation is independent of the COVID-19 outbreak). We do not recommend stockpiling supplies as this will stress the supply chain and likely cause delays and disruptions to your regular orders. Nu-Hope offers ½ boxes for sale through certain dealers.

Safe n Simple Statement

Safe n Simple would like to assure all of the ostomy community that we are well stocked on supplies and do not foresee any issues or concerns with being able to provide products needed during the Coronavirus outbreak.

A Journey From Caregiver to Student, Ostomy Patient, and Nurse

My name is Jennifer Borchek, and I am a recent graduate of Chamberlain University with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing. I am a licensed registered nurse. I also have a colostomy. While I know that my condition changed a part of me, I also know that it has never defined me, my career choice, or who I have become.

A Career Path of Care

My passion for nursing stems from the love and care that I showed for my ailing grandmother during her time of need. My grandmother suffered from many health issues that demanded around the clock care. At the age of 15, my mother and I became the primary caregivers for my grandmother, so we relocated into our grandmother’s home to care for her as her needs increased. This responsibility was not something I took lightly. I spent many nights rushing down the stairs to my grandmother’s bedside when I would hear the slightest sound that might mean she needed attention. Eventually, the running up and down the stairs and the weight of my worry became too much; I picked an empty spot on the floor near my grandmother where I would sleep with one eye and ear open. By the time I graduated high school, I had developed a good sense of care and a strong interest in continuing my path in health care. I decided what better way to use my experience than to become a certified nursing assistant?

After my certification, I attended a local community college to complete my general education requirements and earn an Associate Degree of Science with honors. This brought me closer to my dream career of becoming a nurse. During this time, my grandmother passed away, and I took a break from school to work in a nursing home. My caring nature was fulfilled at my job by helping others know that their loved ones were well attended to. While working in this environment, I knew I could achieve more, and I decided to apply to nursing school to begin my path as a registered nurse. Soon after, I was accepted into a Bachelor program for nursing. I knew that it would be a challenge to continue my education, as balancing school, work, and family could be difficult, but I also knew that my dream and ambitions were strong. I was ready to face the academic and scheduling challenges ahead, but I was not prepared for the unexpected health issues that I encountered along the way.

A New Path with a Slight Turn

One day, while walking between classes, I started to feel a nagging pressure in my genital area. It became sporadic and seemed to have no pattern or reason for occurring. It would oddly come and go regardless of what I was doing at the time. I thought it would just go away, but it persisted. I spent countless months going back and forth to the gynecologist with the same concern. Consistent medical testing provided no reasons for the pain. For more than a year, I felt as though I was wanting and eventually begging to be heard by the doctor. Examination after examination, I started to think that maybe this was all in my head, and at times some doctors and nurses suggested that too. This was eventually disproved one evening when I felt a sudden burst of blood run down my legs after a hot bath. I rushed to the emergency room only to be told that I was “fine” and to follow up with my gynecologist. I went home that night heartbroken and confused; how could this not be enough to diagnose my health issue? So, yet again, I booked another appointment and headed over to the gynecologist’s office that I’d been to so many times before. After I was examined, the doctor removed her gloves, looked at me and said, “This is not your vagina anymore; this is your rectum. Go to the colorectal surgeon and tell them that you’re bleeding.” She walked out of the room without saying another word. I couldn’t even begin to comprehend what she was saying. Why would I need a surgeon? What does a colorectal surgeon have to do with my vagina? I was filled with a furious, confused, frustrated rage, and I was scared. I left with more questions than I arrived with, and now I was heading into unfamiliar territory. Did I have cancer? What kind of surgery would I need?

I later booked an appointment with a knowledgeable and focused colorectal surgeon at a well-respected teaching hospital. It took three very long weeks for my appointment date to arrive.

Diagnosis over Despair

I met the colorectal surgeon and he told me I had to be diagnosed under anesthesia. He suggested it was an anal fistula during the initial appointment. I was not sure what this diagnosis meant or how it happened, but in all, I liked and trusted this doctor. I felt as though I finally found someone who understood what I was going through and could diagnose what I had been complaining about for over a year. I scheduled the procedure during my one-week break from school. I liked that the doctor not only respected me and my concerns and feelings, but I also appreciated that he was very understanding of my desire to become a nurse. He helped me understand that my condition would not prevent me from living a normal life and achieving my degree.

Weeks later, I underwent anesthesia to be diagnosed. My surgeon told me after that I needed more surgeries to treat my newly discovered health issue. I had a rectovaginal fistula and he informed me that I had had it for at least five years. He also stated there was no exact reason why I had developed a fistula. While this made complete sense looking back at all my symptoms, I still cried when I heard this report. Suddenly, all the missing pieces were finally fitting together.

I had a diagnosis, but this was not the end of my battle. I underwent six separate surgeries all while maintaining honors in nursing school. The most recent was my ostomy surgery. During this time, I dropped down to only taking one class and had been unable to work a career-related job because of my health needs. The hours of studying were long and strenuous, but I fought through recovery one day at a time. Hauling heavy books and running from class to class were no longer a part of my day. Healing was just as important as learning, and I managed to balance the two. I often studied while soaking in the bathtub, as this was the doctor’s order to help the healing process.

During the increased workload of nursing school, I met two very caring friends, Laura and Bert, who helped me along the way. They were there for me when things got rough and made sure I didn’t fall behind in school during my health obstacles. I asked for health-related accommodations and was able to have Laura and Bert with me in every class and during clinical. This was a way to be sure that I would have the support and care if necessary. As a new ostomate, I knew anything can happen spontaneously. Having caring and trusting friends nearby encouraged me to relax about my condition and focus on my studies.

More Frustration, but Still Focused

Throughout my path, I was somewhat saddened to learn that ostomy surgery was a necessity. I understood that my fistula was not healing with the multiple surgeries that were performed, so the ostomy became a part of something I learned to accept. Even now my focus is to heal, rather than stress the need to reverse my ostomy before my fistula has completely healed. I was informed by my colorectal surgeon that rushing the process could result in the same challenges I had when I started my journey.

Jennifer with her close friend Jenell, left, whom she met at a UOAA Affiliated Support Group Meeting in Illinois.

Finding Friendship and Support through the Flaws

During my hospital stay for my ostomy surgery, my Wound, Ostomy and Continence (WOC) Nurse informed me that the Loyola University Medical Center held monthly ostomy support group meetings (One of 315 UOAA Affiliated Support Groups in the U.S.) and that she thought it would be beneficial for me to attend. She mentioned a young woman around my age who had recently had surgery. I thought it couldn’t hurt to show up.

I hoped to gain tips on care, products and living life differently with what seemed to be a flawed digestive system. I had already researched some of this online and in magazines, but I decided that more information could not hurt. Three weeks after major surgery, I walked through the door of the meeting room, still in pain and feeling a bit awkward about the whole thing. I sat down behind the youngest person in the room. She turned around and immediately greeted me with a friendly smile and introduced herself and her mom to me. She is in her late 20’s, her name is Jenell, and her stoma’s name is Piglet. Suddenly, I didn’t feel so nervous when Jenell asked why I came to the meeting. When I told her my story she said that it was unlike any story she had heard before. We spent the rest of the meeting talking about all things ostomy. We exchanged telephone numbers after the meeting and quickly became good friends.

Jenell eventually shared her own story with me and the story of naming her ostomy. Most ostomates feel naming their stoma helps them accept the transition of having an ostomy. With Jenell’s encouragement, I named my stoma “Rosita,” symbolizing that an ostomy reminds me of a rose. Jenell has helped me in so many ways by encouraging me about my health condition; she gave me confidence and showed me that even though my body changed, it doesn’t mean I changed as a person. She also taught me how to handle certain situations. For example, because of our invisible illnesses, we feel the need to educate the public on unseen chronic physical conditions. Together, the four of us – myself and Jenell and our stomas, Piglet and Rosita – make quite a team. We have a lot to be concerned about, but we also have a great future and much to be thankful for. We’ll face more challenges, but we’ll do it together.

My own experiences have helped me decide that I want to become a WOC Nurse and tell others with the same condition that they also can live a normal life. I want to help others with the transition of becoming an ostomate. I want others to know that they can follow their dreams, share their successes, lead by example, and show care from their experiences. I decorated my graduation cap to celebrate my decision and I included Rosita in my design to recognize that I have successfully overcome my challenges, and to show my ostomy is part of me and part of my future.

I am ecstatic to be sending out applications to be hired as a registered nurse because I never thought this day would come due to all my uncertain health issues. However, I will have to wait until my next surgery and through recovery. I know I’ll get there eventually because my challenges will not stop my dream!

Appreciation

All in all, I am very grateful for those I have in my life who have supported me: for Jenell for her friendship, for my surgeon with his knowledge and talents, for the WOC nurse that helped me get through my transition of being an ostomate, for my instructors for teaching me so well, for my classmates Laura and Bert and all the support they gave me, for Rosita for being so accommodating of my ongoing issues, and most importantly for my mother to whom I attribute my success. She encouraged my caring nature, has kept me strong and motivated, has lifted me when my spirits were low, and she is the reason I have fought so hard to become a registered nurse!

2019 Advocacy Accomplishments We Can All be Proud of

By UOAA Advocacy Manager Jeanine Gleba

I pride myself on being an “action person” and nothing gives me greater satisfaction than checking those boxes and crossing off items on my lists to-do (daily, short-term, long-term etc) both in my personal life and professionally. So I get super excited at year-end when I can reflect and look back at all that UOAA has accomplished in our advocacy efforts!  I’m happy to report 2019 was not an exception. Although many priorities are ongoing and I can’t actually cross them off my list, I remind myself that Rome was not built in a day and realize to make a major impact in the health care world it could take many years. The important thing for all of us to remember is that we are making progress and positive change is happening.

UOAA Ostomy Advocates at the DDNC

Ostomy advocates at the DDNC Public Policy Forum in March.

Each year UOAA’s Advocacy Committee establishes annual goals based on the strategies outlined in UOAA’s Advocacy Agenda. We have learned that the needs of the ostomy community are fluid and more often than not, I find each year that new priorities must get added to the list. These goals and priorities keep us organized and ensure we stay focused on where we can have the most effect given our organization’s limited resources.

In no particular order and not an all-inclusive list below will give you an idea of what we worked on and accomplished in 2019. This does not include Ostomy Awareness Day efforts as they were previously shared: 

Completed the “Expect More: Take Control of Your Healthcare” self-advocacy toolkit with checklistsAll of the parts and resources are online here. In 2019 there were 579 downloads of the resources and the ostomy supply checklist had the most downloads at 247.

Best in Practice Research Project Launched – The purpose of this research project is to examine components of UOAA’s Ostomy and Continent Diversion Patient Bill of Rights (PBOR) and demonstrate best in practice standard guidelines for ostomy care. In 2019 we collected the data, in 2020 we will conduct the data analysis phase, publish results and ideally find ways to use the results to improve patient outcomes.

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Ostomy Supply Policy 

  • Conducted an online survey earlier and analyzed results to better understand the issue of obtaining greater than allowable quantities for those that have a medical necessity such as a high output stoma
  • Submitted comments and recommendations from UOAA to CMS for the Simplifying Documentation Initiative (SDI) and the Patients Over Paperwork Initiative to reduce burden as it relates to the ostomy supply process. 
  • We have a subcommittee comprised of medical professionals, manufacturer representatives, and patient advocates who will continue this effort in 2020.

Legislative Priorities 

  • Advocated on the Disability Integration Act (DIA), Removing Colorectal Screening Barriers, Ostomy Awareness Day, Step Therapy, and Competitive Bidding Program
  • Released two new position statements for DIA and Opioids
  • Supported the DDNC Step Therapy National Day of Advocacy

Additional Efforts to Expand Patient Bill of Rights

  • Safe n Simple is now including the PBOR Wallet Card in new ostomy patient starter kits and Byram Healthcare now includes it in their ostomy educational booklet

Further Advocacy Outreach and Collaborations 

  • Upfront with Ostomies Column: As a result of contacting the editor of the Wound Management Prevention journal UOAA now has its own column in this clinician journal.  5 articles were published in 2019
  • UOAA was invited by the CMS Quality organization to submit a new idea for the 2021 Improvement Activities used in the Merit-based Incentive Payment System. Ex-committee Member Barbara Dale and I submitted for consideration two modifications to existing improvement activities that focuses on re-evaluation of ostomy care and supplies
  • Access and Care Coalition: Successfully continued to ensure Congress refrains from expanding the Medicare Competitive Bidding program to include ostomy and urological supplies 
  • 3172 people downloaded the TSA Travel Communication Card
  • Started efforts with OEM of LAX airport in CA to make restroom improvements for ostomy accessibility; created UOAA guidelines for United States ostomy restroom accommodations 
  • Between myself and members of the Advocacy Committee we authored or contributed to 18 magazine and UOAA e-newsletter articles on advocacy-related topics

Looking forward to greater achievements in 2020!