Whether Temporary or Permanent UOAA information and Support can help you Succeed in Life with an Ostomy.

By Ed Pfueller, UOAA

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Colorectal cancer often has no warning signs or symptoms, and it affects more than 140,000 men and women each year. It is largely preventable with screening and treatable if caught early.

What can you do? Congress has introduced a bill Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Act (S668/H.R.1570). This act would fix a problem in Medicare that is a major deterrent to senior citizens getting screened. Currently, Medicare covers screening colonoscopies at no cost to the patient, but if polyps are removed during the screening procedure, beneficiaries are hit with unexpected costs.  Ouch!  This bill waives Medicare coinsurance requirements with respect to colorectal cancer screening tests, regardless of the code billed for a resulting diagnosis or procedure.

You can click here to help UOAA and other advocacy organizations advocate for final passage of this legislation in 2019.

You’ll also find that colorectal cancer survivors engage with United Ostomy Associations of America (UOAA) all year long.

If your cancer requires surgery you may have been told you’ll need an ostomy. In many cases, this is a temporary ileostomy (from the small intestine) or colostomy (large intestine). This may be required to give a portion of the bowel a chance to rest and heal. When healing has occurred, the colostomy can often be reversed and normal bowel function restored. A permanent colostomy may be required however when a disease affects the end part of the colon or rectum.

A colostomy is a surgically created opening in the abdomen in which a piece of the colon (large intestine) is brought outside the abdominal wall to create a stoma through which digested food passes into an external pouching system. A colostomy is created when a portion of the colon or rectum is removed due to a disease process such as colorectal cancer or a damaged area of the colon.

If you need lifesaving ostomy surgery remember-you are not alone. 725,000- 1 million people in the U.S. of all ages and backgrounds live with an ostomy. You too can do this, but it is critical to connect with UOAA resources. Especially seek out one of our almost 300 UOAA Affiliated Ostomy Support Groups in the U.S. before, or shortly after, your surgery. Peer support and preparation can put you on the path to success in what will be a challenging time both emotionally and physically.  Ask if the hospital has an ostomy nurse and insist on having your stoma placement marked before surgery. These and other self-advocacy tools are paramount and outlined in our Ostomy Patient Bill of Rights.

Our new ostomy patient guide is available to all who need it and is a great overview of what to expect. Our colostomy guide has even more in-depth information. You may feel too overwhelmed as you are discharged at the hospital to fully understand ostomy pouching systems and accessories and lifestyle considerations. If you have a question medical contact your doctor or nurse, in you have a quality of life question- UOAA likely has the answers.

Let’s clear up a few myths right from the start and learn some facts about living with an ostomy. After the healing period outlined by your surgeon you can swim, bathe, be intimate, travel, and embrace a new normal life. After some trial and error, you may also eat most of the foods you have been able to eat in the past.

Certified Wound Ostomy and Continent Nurse Diana Gallagher has outlined Tips for a Succesful Recovery After Ostomy Surgery for us that you should use as a roadmap for success.

Contrary to what it may seem from social media not everyone with an ostomy will be a candidate for a reversal operation. We also have a blog post to learn more Facts About Ostomy Reversals.

We do encourage you to read patient stories and tell your own story. People have ostomies for a wide variety of reasons and people with bowel diseases you may not have been aware of often have an increased risk for colorectal cancer. This includes ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, pre-cancerous polyps, and hereditary syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) or hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (HNPCC), or Lynch syndrome.

Celebrate Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month and connect with Fight Colorectal Cancer or the Colon Cancer Alliance on how to make an impact. And even if your ostomy is temporary, remember to speak out on Ostomy Awareness Day on October 5th, donate or join our advocacy efforts, or a support group to give back to the next cancer survivor in need.

UOAA is proud to be a member organization of the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT). The NCCRT is a collaborative partnership with more than 100 member organizations across the nation, committed to taking action in the screening, prevention, and early detection of colorectal cancer.

UOAA Supports the Survivors of Colorectal Cancer

 

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosis among men and women combined in the United States. There is currently no cure, but it’s 90 percent treatable if caught early with a screening. American Cancer Society estimates there will be over 140,000 new cases and over 50,000 deaths this year.

Recent research has confirmed what many have long suspected–more young people are dying of colorectal cancer. Ten percent of all new colorectal cancer patients are under the age of 50 and are too often misdiagnosed.

People with other bowel diseases have an increased risk for colorectal cancer. This includes ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, pre-cancerous polyps, and hereditary syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) or hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (HNPCC), or Lynch syndrome.

If you need to have lifesaving ostomy surgery because of colorectal cancer or any other reason, education and peer-support is available from the approximately 300 affiliated support groups of United Ostomy Associations of America. Ostomy patients of all ages and their families, friends and caregivers are welcome. Find a meeting near you today. You are not alone.

UOAA is proud to be a member organization of the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT). The NCCRT is a collaborative partnership with more than 100 member organizations across the nation, committed to taking action in the screening, prevention, and early detection of colorectal cancer.

Colorectal Cancer: Be informed if you are a candidate for an ostomy reversal 

 

By Joanna Burgess-Stocks, BSN, RN, CWOCN

 

  • Not everyone who has an ostomy as a result of colorectal cancer and other diseases will have the option of having their ostomy reversed.  Some people will need to keep their ostomy for life.

 

  • Your surgeon will determine when an ostomy will be reversed. There are many factors that determine a reversal such as the extent of the disease, a patient’s overall health and treatment process (radiation and chemotherapy).  Most patients with temporary ostomies will have the ostomy for about 3-6 months.

 

  • Surgery for reversal of an ostomy is usually much less involved than the surgery that you had to create the ostomy. So if you are feeling nervous, keep that in mind. A typical hospital course is 3-4 days on average.

 

  • For some patients, interrupting bowel function with a temporary ileostomy increases the chances that you will experience alterations in bowel function after reversal of your stoma. These symptoms can include rectal urgency, frequency, fragmentation of stool and incontinence. It is important that you notify your surgeon as soon as possible with these symptoms. Treatment includes behavioral strategies based on the symptoms and includes dietary modifications, incontinence products, skin care (use of barrier creams such as zinc oxide) and medications such as loperamide. More involved but helpful recommendations are pelvic muscle retraining (PMR) to regain sphincter strength and biofeedback. This therapy is done by a highly trained physical therapist.

 

  • Some physical therapists recommend PMR prior to surgery or radiation to assess muscles and teach strategies for ongoing muscle strengthening that can be carried over after surgery. This helps to address any coordination or existing weakness prior to radiation due to chemo or post-operative recovery. If PMR is recommended after surgery, it is best to wait at least 6 weeks and with the surgeon’s approval.