Living 10 steps from death’s door can take an emotional toll. My name is Makeda Armorer-Wade and I am an inspirational life coach and best-selling author. In July 2010, I received my first ostomy and January 2016, I received my second. While both surgeries were difficult physically as well as emotionally; my first was more difficult than the second, because I was not included in the decision in any way. It was an emergency surgery following a resection surgery a week earlier. The decision was made during a follow-up test and they were actually drawing on my belly in the elevator on my way up to the room. It landed me in the ICU and 10 steps from death’s door.

The second ostomy surgery was a decision that I made based on the recommendation from my GYN and surgeon. I was so debilitated that this was my only option. So although it was very difficult, it was less traumatic than the first, because I was involved in the decision and I thought I knew what I could expect.

I went to the United Ostomy Association of America (UOAA) and read everything that I could. I went to what I call, “Ostomy School.” I did my best to connect with patients who were having a similar experience. Because I have lived with a Crohn’s disease diagnosis from the age of 16; I’ve understood the necessity to research and learn all that I can to manage my condition. Crohn’s disease was not a common diagnosis at the time I was diagnosed, and giving up wasn’t an option for me. Connecting with others and gaining knowledge was freeing. The more I learned, the more comfortable I became with living and embracing life with my new friend (ostomy) Rosebutt Buttercup. Yes, I named her. I was able to support new ostomates by participating in the monthly Mt. Sinai post-surgical support group.

Having my second ostomy has given me the freedom to go back to work, take care of my family, swim, cycle, attend social gatherings, participate in community service and travel. Sometimes listening to the despair of my fellow ostomates and experiencing my own despair at times, for lack of knowledge is what spurred me into action. I wanted to be an example, that there is still life to be lived after an ostomy. Our mindset is important. Where our mind goes, the body follows. Life is what we make of it.

As an author, coach and public speaker. I use my platform to share my story, as evidence that life can be all the things that you are open to making it. I am advocating for sponsorship to release a course that will be available for a small fee, to anyone who has an ostomy, considering getting one or a caretaker of someone who has one.

The biggest positive about living with an ostomy is understanding that without it, I would not be here. The first one was reversed, but as I moved toward having my second one I knew enough and it was the only way. I made the decision to move forward and I am not looking back. I had to embrace that I was enough and the new possibilities for my life were endless.

I realized that as long as I follow my P.L.A.N.(c), I have fewer challenges. I Prepare by anticipating each scenario; I Let go of Shame for all of the things that I can’t always do; I Ask for help when needed; and I Never give up no matter what. Repetition breeds mastery.

So, I share with others that having an ostomy is just an alternative way of going to the bathroom. We all have to go the bathroom. But now, I have the benefit of having more control over when I go. An ostomy is life-saving. An ostomy is an opportunity to really live your best life on purpose.

And while you may not feel that way in the beginning. It does get better. My advice as an experienced ostomate, is to get as much information about your surgery prior to getting it, if time allows. Speak to people who are successfully living with and managing their life with their ostomy. Read, watch videos and ask as many questions as you may have. And then work your P.L.A.N.(c). Be inspired, Be encouraged, Be hopeful. I believe in you. The possibilities are endless.

Summer is quickly approaching and before you know it we will be in Philadelphia at UOAA’s 7th National Conference. With so many new and exciting things planned it is sure to be the best ever! I know whenever I attend a conference I plan well in advance and create my own personal schedule to ensure I do and see all that is of particular interest to me.  This includes conference sessions, social activities and taking some time for local sightseeing in a place I may never have been before. I also always go out of my way to try a new food or beverage native to a particular city or state and in this case it will be an iconic “Philly cheesesteak”.   

As UOAA’s Advocacy Manager I’m very excited that this conference is being held in Philadelphia, a city so very rich in history and quite frankly home to our country’s first advocates.  Here is my twist on ways you can take advantage of this city and our conference, if you have a soft spot for things “advocacy”-related:

  1. Be sure to sign UOAA’s Ostomy and Continent Diversion Patient Bill of Rights during Exhibit Hall hours at the UOAA booth. These signatures will be collected for potential use in advocacy efforts to improve quality in ostomy health care. You also can see one of the 12 surviving original copies of the US Bill of Rights at the National Constitution Center while in Philadelphia.
  2. Pay tribute to our country’s first advocates and visit the Independence National Historic Park to walk in Independence Hall where our founding fathers signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776.
  3. Celebrate your independence and and see the most famous cracked bell in American history – the Liberty Bell.  You can see it for free at the landmark Liberty Bell Center.
  4. Calling all superheroes!  On Wednesday, August 7th at 2:45 pm attend the UOAA Advocacy Session United Ostomy Advocates to the Rescue”! Come hear first-hand from some of UOAA’s advocates on how they use their “superpowers”, and also learn more about current advocacy efforts underway at UOAA. Leave our national conference empowered to make a positive difference!
  5. Many times in advocacy we face an uphill battle and feel like an underdog. For decades now Philly has been known for the ultimate underdog tale in the Rocky movie series. Show your resilience and run/climb the infamous Rocky stairs at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.  There are 72 stone steps and at the top you can chant “Yo, Philadelphia! I did it!”. Or you can take a picture at the statue of this legendary “Italian Stallion” located near the bottom of the steps.
  6. Philadelphia is known as the “City of Brotherly Love”.  Show your love for the ostomy community and go to Love Park to get a picture at the “LOVE” statue designed by Robert Indiana.

    Love park

  7. Be sure to stop by UOAA’s booth in the Exhibit Hall to pick up some of our self-advocacy tools and educational resources for use when you get back home in your own advocacy efforts.
  8. When it comes to advocacy and activists I can’t think of a more wiser and inspiring person than the fascinating and influential Benjamin Franklin! Not only was he one of the founding fathers of the United States, but he was an author, politician, postmaster, printer, inventor, scientist, diplomat and statesman. Of interest to the ostomy community is that he was the inventor of the flexible urinary catheter and founded the first public hospital!  If you have time, visit the Franklin Science Museum or just drive by the Benjamin Franklin Bridge. As an advocate I am inspired by so many of his famous quotes. I often say the key to advocacy is not only raising awareness and educating others, but also patience and perseverance.  Here are a few of my favorite quotes by Ben Franklin:

“Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.”

“He that can have patience can have what he will.”

“Justice will not be served until those who are unaffected are as outraged as those who are.”

“Energy and persistence conquer all things.”

    9) On Saturday, August 10th, at 2:15PM, please pop-in to contribute to UOAA’s first-ever research study by completing a short survey.  This data will help us make improvements to the underserved ostomy population. Upon doing so, you will also be entered into a drawing to win a prize!

   10) Join us during the conference Closing Ceremony at 3:30PM on Saturday, August 10th where we will be recognizing for the first-time the top advocate in the ostomy community! The Mighty Advocate Award, sponsored by UOAA, is a new biennial award intended to honor one individual for his/her significant accomplishments and contributions to support UOAA advocacy efforts and/or has brought greater ostomy awareness in the United States. Your presence will help make this a special moment in our advocacy history!

 

In conclusion, I’m excited to put a name to the face of the many advocates who have emailed me or have worked with me on advocacy efforts over the past couple of years, and meeting more of the people we strive to make an impact every day in our work at UOAA. See you in Philly!

I  had been increasingly struggling with symptoms for over two years with medical personnel brushing me off because I did not fit the norms for bladder cancer and didn’t check off enough risk factors for it. By the time of diagnosis, at the age of forty, I was perpetually in pain and discomfort, I was periodically urinating blood clots and I was unable to sleep through the night due to the pain and frequent urination. I felt like I spent most of my time and energy running to the restroom. I even had one ED physician laugh at me and assume that I didn’t know my own body well enough to know whether I was urinating blood clots or having issues with my menstruation cycle.

I had my urostomy surgery on September 23, 2016 after receiving a bladder cancer diagnosis on August 12, 2016. I had Stage IV Bladder Cancer with a T4, muscle-invasive tumor.

Having my surgery has allowed me to get back to my own life and start living again…mostly without pain. I’m able to sleep through the night again and I do not spend most of my time running to the restroom.

I have been working in a pediatric GI office since 2012, so not only was I aware of ostomies and that a person could live a long, productive, great-quality life with an ostomy, I also had my very own personal ostomy support crew. My coworkers are amazing and have been so supportive through everything…several nurses have even given me ostomy/stoma care tips and helped me address potential concerns. One nurse, a true-blue friend, even helped me change my bag a couple of times when I first had my surgery and was in rehab!

Finding Support

During my chemo treatments, I first started looking at online resources and started reaching out. I remembered that my WOCN told me there was an active local ostomy support group. It wasn’t until November 2017 that I was physically able to make any meetings in person.

Encountering the Greater Cincinnati Ostomy Association GCOA was the best connection I could have made post-everything. I originally tried to connect with people through the American Cancer Society and the Cancer Support Community, but bladder cancer is sort of a red-headed stepchild of the cancer community. It affects many on a number of levels, but NO ONE talks about. Not everyone diagnosed with bladder cancer has to go through the extreme treatment measures I did, so there are varying experiences within the diagnosis. However, going to the local cancer-focused groups was very frustrating and discouraging for me as most of the people I met there were breast cancer survivors whose experiences did not have any similarities to my own. There were no local bladder cancer-specific groups in my area and there still are not.

When I finally connected with UOAA/GCOA, I found more understanding, empathy, compassion, and comradery in the first meeting than I had in several with the cancer organizations. People definitely made the difference. Online support was okay, but even there I was sometimes frustrated with the set up because it too easily turns into a forum for sharing memes and complaining about their situations. There’s not a lot of educational conversations or intellectual discussions about what I was experiencing, which was something I was craving.

Becoming Active Again

I am still experiencing neuropathy in my feet and ankles as a side effect of the chemo treatments that I will probably deal with for life and I am still working on getting my strength and energy back, but I am gradually reclaiming everything that I did before. I fell shortly after my last chemo treatment and spent about 3 weeks in the hospital/rehab before getting discharged on a Friday and returning to work the following Monday because I had exhausted all of my medical leave and it was either return to work or lose my job. I did not want to deal with the stress of job hunting after all I had been through and going on disability indefinitely was a luxury that I could not afford, so I returned to work completely bald and using a walker. The first day back, I could barely make it from the front door to my office chair. Still, returning to work was one of the best things for me because it forced me to have to rebuild my strength and be active.

I now work 40+ hours a week again with a team I love supporting and I volunteer with the GCOA and Hughes High School, my alma mater, as much as I can. I took over the presidency of the GCOA back in January. I still live alone on the 2nd floor of my quaint, inner-city, 2-bedroom apartment. I enjoy spending time with friends and extended family. Last May, I rented a car and went on a road trip by myself to Columbus, OH to participate in the BCAN Walk to End Bladder Cancer and catch up with some amazing people that I have in my life. I will be taking a plane and train trip in August to attend the UOAA National Conference and go on vacation in upstate New York afterward. I am finally able to start walking and being a bit more active again and have started trying to figure out how to do some of the higher energy things I used to do (like dancing and workout videos) despite the neuropathy, which sometimes makes it hard for me to coordinate my feet. It’s all a process though and I try to take it one day at a time. I’m hoping to be able to take a trip to Argentina in 2020…your attitude and determination are what makes the difference and I’m determined to accomplish things that I have always wanted to do despite the obstacles I’ve had in my past.

Raising Awareness

Both bladder cancer and urostomies are extremely rare and there are huge discrepancies in diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer, especially with women and minorities. It has been really important to me to bring awareness to both issues because I truly believe that lives can not only be improved, but saved by advocating, educating and raising awareness of bladder cancer and ostomies. So many people immediately think that having your bladder or part of your colon is going to end life as they know it. In part, they are correct, but not in the way that most people think at first thought. People with ostomies can live long, productive lives and be amazing leaders in their communities…just like anyone else. Just because you will always have a medical condition that requires the use of medical equipment does not mean that your life is over. It is different, that’s all. We’re all different though, having an ostomy just makes you extra special.

When my urology oncology surgeon told me that he wanted to remove my bladder (along with various other abdominal parts), I didn’t hesitate at all and said, “Okay. So what’s next?” I knew that my life would be over if I didn’t get an ostomy and I knew that my life would not be over with an ostomy. It was one of the easiest medical decisions I have ever made. He could have asked me if I wanted a cup of coffee it was that easy. That doesn’t mean that I didn’t have struggles and the journey wasn’t a challenge because I did and it was, but I am grateful that I had a choice of life or death and that I was able to choose life so I could get on with mine. Raising awareness for bladder cancer and ostomy awareness means that I could help someone make that life-saving decision that much more quickly and that they would be able to move onto healing and gratitude that much more quickly, instead of being bitter, pissed and depressed over losing a non-essential piece of themselves.

I have raised money, made social media posts, written articles, blog, had discussions, and encouraged others to go outside of their comfort zone to seek support. Additionally, I fairly quickly began being more involved with my local ASG and am committed to thinking outside the box and expanding opportunities to reach people where they are at and, hopefully, encouraging to become/remain involved and to share their own stories.

Staying Positive

I’m alive! I’m not in constant pain and discomfort. I can sleep through the night and not be up every 10 minutes to go the bathroom. I don’t have to do that “gotta go” dance while standing in line for the ladies’ room. I can hook up to my Foley for long trips or binge-watching and not have to move for hours. My bladder does not interrupt me in the middle of the best scenes when I go to the theater. I’m able to concentrate again. I can relieve myself while standing up or writing my name in the snow (gotta see a little humor in the situation)!

My advice is to just focus on living your life. The closer you get to doing everything you did before, the more positive the picture of life with an ostomy becomes. Yes, you can live without those parts and you can still be an active person. Your life and your dreams are still unlimited…it just might take a little extra preparation and planning, depending on your personal diagnosis and situation, but real life and real dreams take hard work, no matter who you are! You have to work for the things in life that you want anyway…no matter who you are or what your circumstance is, but the harder you have to work for something, the more worthwhile, valuable and meaningful it is to you. Only you can make the decision on how meaningful you want your journey to be though.

Overcoming Challenges

Most of my challenges are from my cancer treatments and not from having an ostomy. Still, bending and twisting are sometimes challenges. I do have a hernia that I way too quickly achieved by sneezing and, although it does not typically bother me, it is something to keep in consideration when I am trying new movements or lifting heavier objects. I have neuropathy and slight hearing loss as side effects of my chemo treatments and those are more annoying and challenging than my ostomy issues. Every once in a while, I have a leak, but I generally carry at least a few supplies with me so I just try to catch it quickly, change and move on. I’m really fortunate to have amazing friends, family & coworkers who are really understanding and supportive when these things happen and they don’t bat an eye when I need to deal with these things. Overall, I’ve pretty much learned to have a new definition of “normal” and I take things day by day and slow down when I need to and, most of all, when new things come up, I TRY instead of just giving in.

Advice for those who may need ostomy surgery?

Don’t think twice! No, it isn’t always easy and it isn’t always an easy choice. Sometimes, it’s all very hard. Yes, life will be different, but, in the long run, it’ll be worth it and at least you will still have a life to live.  If you give the ostomy and yourself a chance, having an ostomy will ultimately give you a better quality of life. Also, don’t be afraid to reach out to others who have had similar experiences…that’s how you get through the challenging moments, days, and weeks. Also, I feel like it is critical to share your own story in some way, shape or form. Not only does it help others get through their situations, but it is a great way for you to heal and get through your own story. Sharing your story is a way of honoring yourself and allowing you to shed light on your own strength because many times you don’t realize just how strong you are. Martin Luther King, Jr said, “Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.” Keeping your story bottled up inside and not even sharing it with the people you love is detrimental to your journey. You matter and so does your story, so share it.

Making a Difference

Last year, I hosted a virtual Run for Resilience Ostomy 5k walk locally and I had 6 humans and a canine share in a beautiful day at a local park. It was great to share my story with people who hadn’t heard about it before while walking. Prior to my own surgery, my team at work and I would wear blue and green on Ostomy Awareness Day in support of the patients and families we care for.

I have grown up participating in similar events and have always found them inspiring and empowering. This year, we hope to have even more participation and invite everyone to meet at a group meal afterward. I will be attending my first UOAA National Conference in August and I’m excited to make new connections and learn more information that will enable me to assist others in getting back into life after receiving an ostomy. I would like to see others get involved in these events because it gives them connections, information, support and empowerment. There is no substitute for making connections in real life with people who have tackled the same problems, fought similar battles, and, most of all, WON. There is strength in numbers and we are all stronger together.

Barbara Dale, RN, CWOCN, CHHN, COS-C
Director of WOC Services at Quality Home Health
Jeanine Gleba UOAA Advocacy Manager

I am a Wound, Ostomy, Continence (WOC) nurse in a rural home health agency. I have worked in the home health field since 2001. Many times when I visit patients in their homes, they complain about the lack of knowledgeable ostomy nurses in the facility (e.g., hospital) they came from or even from my own agency.  I try to explain to them that ostomy care is specialized and in general nurses don’t get much (if any) training in nursing school for this type of medical condition. I compare this with my own lack of IV education and skills since I rarely do labs or port flushes and have lost many of my previous skills. We can’t all know everything about all aspects of medical care and not every agency has access to an ostomy trained or ostomy certified medical provider. Nonetheless, it is the home health agency’s responsibility when they accept you as a patient to provide you the care you need and deserve. You have a right to quality care.

Are you aware of the patient bill of rights (PBOR) for persons with an ostomy or continent diversion? United Ostomy Associations of America (UOAA) developed the PBOR in 1977 and revised it in 2017. The PBOR is designed so that you can know what to expect and what is reasonable for you to ask for when you receive care. If you haven’t already looked over the PBOR, please take time to familiarize yourself. In addition, if you use ostomy or urological supplies, here is what you should understand and expect when receiving medical care in your home.

Be Prepared

Be prepared in advance to take appropriate steps to ensure you receive quality ostomy care.  As you prepare for discharge to home after your ostomy surgery, ask your case manager to make sure your home health agency has a certified ostomy nurse. This will also be important if you are a person already living with an ostomy with a new medical condition (such as hip surgery or a stroke).  Your home health nurse should re-evaluate your ostomy care. For example, someone with arthritis may have lost dexterity and now needs to switch to a different type of pouching application system or you may have gained or lost some weight over the hospitalization (which can change your abdominal contours and your stoma) and now your current system doesn’t give you 2-5 days wear time anymore.

Change Agencies if Needed

If you are already home and your home health agency does not have a certified ostomy nurse, then request that they consult with one to ensure that you receive the proper optimal care. I often get phone calls or emails from colleagues who work for other agencies asking me ostomy questions or asking if I can come to see their patient. We are all in this together and we all want what is best for the patient, which is YOU! Don’t be afraid to ask for an ostomy nurse!

You may even have to change agencies. It isn’t difficult even though your current agency will likely not want you to change.  You have a right to explain that you must receive your care from a certified ostomy nurse and your current agency, unfortunately, does not provide this type of care. All you have to do is call the agency YOU choose and tell them you want to transfer your care to their agency. Typically the new agency will contact your doctor or ask you to let your doctor know you want to change agencies. The new agency will then inform your current home health agency that they are taking over your care.  

What to do if an Ostomy Nurse is Still Not Available?

If all else fails and for whatever reason you have a home health agency without access to a certified ostomy nurse, you still have resources.  You can:

  • Go to www.wocn.org and look up a patient referral for an ostomy nurse in your area. This content also usually includes contact information for the WOC Nurse in your area.
  • Visit www.ostomy.org for educational resources such as the New Ostomy Patient Guide and UOAA has a dedicated webpage specifically for Ostomy Health Care Resources.
  • Use social media to find others that may be in the same situation as you. There are a multitude of Facebook pages/groups for ostomates with WOC nurses who follow these groups and offer comments or suggestions when specifically asked.

In Conclusion

We cannot say this enough: YOU have a right to quality care and deserve quality care. Know your rights. You deserve to be able to live your life to the fullest with your new or established ostomy.

Patients and medical professionals can work together to improve patient outcomes. If you want to help UOAA drive change and achieve ostomy quality of care improvements for patients while under home care, please print and share these resources with your home health agency: Achieve 5 Star Ostomy Home Health Care and Important Reminders for Home Health Providers Treating People with an Ostomy.

They are all superheroes in our book. They come in on their day off for us, they heal us, they teach us, they empower us, they advocate for us, they volunteer for us, they learn for us, they run our support groups, they make us laugh and help dry our tears.

They are also a central part of UOAA’s 7th National Conference and our advocacy program. Every year we ask our UOAA Affiliated Support Groups to nominate an exemplary nurse for UOAA’s WOC Nurse of the Year Award.

Charlotte Popovich, center, was awarded last year’s WOC Nurse of The Year.

April 14-20, 2019 marks WOC Nurse Appreciation Week hosted by the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society™ (WOCN®). This year WOCN® Society is celebrating and empowering WOC nurses to discover the superhero that lives within them.

This celebration is a fitting time for us to begin our challenge of selecting a winner in a group that are all heroes. We know many still hide in the shadows and their good deeds remain unrecognized.

Prepare to be inspired by these testimonials from our Affiliated Support Groups who nominated this year’s amazing group of nurses.

Shirley Abraham
Ostomy Support Group at Baylor University Medical Center in Texas

Shirley has been passionately involved in the Baylor University Medical Center (BUMC) Ostomy Support Group since its inception. As a member of the founding committee, she was instrumental in inaugurating the new and much needed support group in October 2018. BUMC is a large hospital with a substantial number of colorectal and urological surgery patients, and the need for such a support group was very evident. She works closely with the surgeons to provide a smooth discharge and post-operative recovery transition. She also works in Baylor’s out-patient ostomy clinic, serving patients with peristomal problems or pouching issues.

“She is well respected as an expert in her field, dedicated to her field and passionate about the quality of care that she delivers. She is a true example of a highly dedicated RN and skilled WOC nurse”

Janice Beitz
Philadelphia Ostomy Association

For close to 20 years Janice has been asking the Philadelphia Ostomy Association to periodically come speak to her WOC nursing class. We have never appeared at her class where the students haven’t thanked us for our time and loved the opportunity to speak to people with ostomies. The trickledown effect of being invited by Janice to speak at her WOC nursing class is that her students graduate and the ones that stay local to this area call us to visit their patients.

“Her strongest attribute would have to be her commitment to her student’s, UOAA as a support system that provides Information to patients and a Patient Visiting Service where ostomates visit patients pre and post op to assist in the rehabilitation of new ostomates in getting on with their lives by showing them they can still work, dress in stylish clothes, and basically live a relatively normal life after surgery.”

Erin Donohoe
Ileostomy Association of New York, Inc.

Erin distributes monthly meeting flyers to clients and family members who may benefit from our meetings, and posts meeting notices in a prominent location on the hospital floor. She participates in Board of Directors meetings and is on Ileostomy Association of New York’s (IANY’s) medical advisory board. Erin is available for contact by e-mail or phone if urgent situation/question arises. She has been willing to provide her services to home-bound ostomates and has been flexible regarding her fees for home visits. She has often provided these services gratis for patients in need.

“Erin has exhibited a high degree of professionalism and commitment befitting a representative of the WOC nurse profession. She is a strong advocate for IANY and believes in the positive impact that mutual support groups can confer. Since our BOD and general meetings are held on Sunday afternoons, she willingly sacrifices precious personal time to be present. She consistently shows compassion, understanding to persons with ostomies and their significant others who approach her for help and assistance.

Diana Gallagher
North West Arkansas Ostomy Support Group

Diana started the group over ten years ago. It started out in a small room with about eight patients. It is because of her compassion, ability to educate and availability to both patients and doctors that our group has grown to a base of about 140 patients. We have patients that still come after ten years knowing they can always learn something new. Diana has extended our group hours for patients in need of education and information. Diana has a very prominent presence, and doctors and surgeons across the area rely on her expertise.

“Diana has a patients wellbeing in mind both physically and mentally. She is a constant in our ostomy community that is willing to help any ostomy patient. She is an advocate for patients!” 

Joy Hooper
Ostomy 2-1-1 inc. and South Georgia Ostomy Association

As the only support group in South Georgia, Joy will make home visits to help patients in rural areas as well as bigger cities. She will teach patients everything about caring for their ostomy. She opened an office where patients can get one-on-one care. She helps others find solutions to their problems. Joy will call and talk to any doctor or nurse interested in ostomy care. She travels around the country to teach ostomy care to other nurses.

“Joy Hooper is the most dedicted ostomy nurse. She invented an anatomical apron for helping patients understand their ostomy. She has so much knowledge about ostomy and will teach anyone who wants to know. Joy is a wonderful ostomy nurse and someone I can call on anytime day or night.”  

“Her LIFE is focused around not just our single ASG, but the entire Ostomy community. I would have to say that every attribute and commitment that Joy provides are CRUCIAL for not only our group, but to every other group in the ostomy WORLD.”

Charles Sloan
Boulder County Ostomy Support Group of Colorado

We have meetings in two different hospitals and Charles attends meetings in both facilities, even those that take place in the evening after he is off work. He makes time at the ostomy clinic for support group patients even when they have a full schedule. Charles developed a program for high school students and an in-house education program for the staff at his hospital to educate them in best practices at the bedside of ostomy patients. Charles is passionate about ostomies and designed WOC pins for those who complete his in-house ostomies 101 class. He also designed fun trading cards used for training programs.

“Our group takes a great deal of comfort knowing that Charles is always there for us. If there is an emergency we all know how to contact him and he will provide support.”

Angela Natale-Ryan, Stephanie D’Andrea, Ronnie Funke, Pam Hughes
Union County Ostomy Support Group of New Jersey

This group of four dedicated nurses interface with new members of the support group, and educates medical professionals on the importance of our visiting program. They have established our first Ostomy Center and attend meetings. From the moment I was marked my WOC nurse has been beside me and encouraged me to attend my first support group. In four years we have grown to a UOAA chapter with many members.

Our four WOC nurses are such a cohesive and dependable group of women who concur, coordinate and ensure that all ostomates are treated completely, they are determined to offer the best to all of us. They are problem solvers who never give up until all patients are comfortable. Ostomates are in the best hands possible with the four of them, who act as one!

United Ostomy Associations of America’s (UOAA) 2019 WOC Nurse of the Year Award will be presented during its 7th National Conference in Philadelphia this August.

Support the Disability Integration Act

By Jeanine Gleba UOAA Advocacy Manager

    Sue Mueller, BSN, CWOCN

Does an ostomy qualify as a disability? This is a question that UOAA receives on occasion. You are living with an ostomy, you feel pride that you are independent with your ostomy care, that you are able to problem solve the glitches that arise, you have resumed your former activities and tried a few new ones…life is good.  So it’s confusing when you hear someone tell you that you qualify under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) as having a disability. Perhaps you can walk and talk and see and hear and are independent with your care. You may envision a disabled person as someone who needs help with care, uses a wheelchair or a walker; someone obviously disabled. Well, elimination of waste is a major body function and your elimination of waste has changed; in fact you need to wear a prosthetic device (ostomy appliance) to manage this change. You have a record of an impairment of a major body function, therefore you are protected by the provisions of the ADA. You do not have a visible disability, and not all disabilities are visible. (Please be aware that the term disabled means different things in different systems i.e. in Social Security disabled means unable to work.)

Fast forward 15-20-30 years, you have aged and might be experiencing any number of the challenges that aging brings….combine that with ostomy care and you may find yourself in a whole new world trying to get your needs met and survive in the environment of your choice. That’s when you will be especially glad that you are protected by civil and disability rights legislation such as the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the ADA, Olmstead vs LS, case law and provisions of the Affordable Care Act. Basically, what these legal documents establish is the expectation that people living with disabilities have the same opportunities as people without disabilities; to live and work and participate in their communities, that the same services and supports that are provided in institutions are provided in the community. Many improvements have been accomplished but the institutional bias in service provision has not been eliminated and the services needed to support non-institutional living have not been created.  The Disability Integration Act (DIA) has been proposed in both the US House and Senate as a measure to end institutional bias and promote services in the community and extend the principles established in previous legislation.

The act is bipartisan legislation that ensures people with disabilities have a federally protected right to live and receive services in their own homes or in the setting of their choosing. The DIA further secures our Constitutionally protected right to liberty by preventing disabled people from being forced into costly institutional settings by unnecessary government regulations.

In addition, the DIA assures the full integration of disabled people in the community by ensuring that people with an ostomy and other conditions are able to exercise real choice in where they wish to receive attendant services, assistance with health-related tasks such as “maintenance and use of a stable ostomy” or other services that enable a person with a disability to live in the community such as in an assisted living facility and lead an independent life.

Our patient bill of rights advocacy efforts have illustrated the gap in expectations and the reality of care.  An issue facing the ostomy community especially as they age is that most assisted living facilities (ALF) across our country will not admit someone with an ostomy or in the rare cases where they do, the ALF no longer needs to retain them once the individual can no longer perform self-care with emptying or changing their pouch. Once the door to assisted living is closed the only option is placement in a long-term care facility/nursing home. Assisted Living homes and nursing homes are radically different environments.

We believe that emptying a pouch is a simple activity of daily living that should fall under toileting assistance/hygiene.  When the issues with care at assisted living facilities result in an ostomate requiring long term care in an institution, when that is not their choice it is a civil rights issue and is exactly what the DIA is trying to address. UOAA supports and advocates for this landmark legislation and encourages the ostomy community to take action here to help us garner legislator support and pass this in 2019.

UOAA conference speaker strategically uses humor to help ostomy patients

By Ed Pfueller, UOAA

If you’re a patient of Janice Beitz, PhD, RN, CS, CNOR, CWOCN-AP, CRNP, APNC, ANEF, FNAP, FAAN,  she will likely look you in the eye and know when to employ humor and when not to. If you’re in a rut you may get an ostomy joke to break the ice. “You think this bag is full of crap? You should see my bother in law,” she once quipped, breaking down all barriers for a man struggling to adjust whose brother-in-law seemingly fit the description.

Dr. Janice Beitz is a longtime WOC Nurse and educator who will speak on the power of humor and hope in emotional healing after ostomy surgery.

Ostomy surgery and chronic illness is not a laughing matter, but how you handle it can be a key to your success. It does not seem to be a coincidence that some of the most well-adjusted ostomates tend to have a sense of humor. Humor can change a negative mindset for you and those around you.

Dr. Beitz has over 40 years of nursing experience in acute, sub-acute and outpatient care settings. She’s explored the science behind laughter and health in academia and has seen it in patient settings. She will be a featured speaker at UOAA’s National Conference in Philadelphia this August.

Her talk is entitled, Intestines Are Soooooo Overrated: Psychosocial/Physiological Issues For Ostomates. She’ll discuss the social, psychological and physical issues of having a fecal or urinary diversion. The session will describe the findings from scholarly work on these areas of interest. Strategies for ostomates to achieve a high quality of life including therapeutic use of humor will be emphasized.

Dr. Beitz also teaches the next generation of WOC Nurses as the director of the Rutgers University Camden Wound Ostomy Continence Nursing Education Program (WOCNEP). Students she has taken to visit the jovial and globetrotting members of the Ostomy Support Group of Philadelphia have left in shock. “They turn to me and say these people have traveled more and have a better life than I do!” Dr. Beitz said.

“They are seriously funny,” Dr. Beitz says of the Philadelphia group led by Stanley Cooper that is always laughing and living life to the fullest.

“She is committed to her students. She is committed to all WOC nurses, and she is committed to all patients that need a WOC nurse to ensure they receive the best possible care,” Stanley remarked.

“Janice loves to have a good laugh and will supply a good laugh when she can. When she spoke to our group, she started off with a funny cartoon from a newspaper that she projected on a screen.” Stanley.

“One thing she said to me after her appearance was that she always wanted to enter a room after being introduced to KC and the Sunshine Band singing Get Down Tonight. That is the type of good spirited, happy, energetic person that she is” Stanley said.

Emotional health will be touched upon in many other conference sessions as well. A session geared toward young adults will address body image and self-confidence with an ostomy. Relationships and sexuality sessions will often center on emotional health as well. Overcoming physical challenges often comes quicker than lingering emotional ones.

For those who have not had a UOAA Affiliated Support Group experience, the peer support at conference can provide a sense of camaraderie that gives an enlightening experience for the many who still struggle with the day-to-day challenges of living with an ostomy. Caregivers are also not forgotten at conference with a session on how to cope with caregiver stress.

UOAA’s vision is a society where people with ostomies and intestinal or urinary diversions are universally accepted and supported socially, economically, medically and psychologically. Connect with us locally, online or at conference and get on a positive path.

At the conference, perhaps we can arrange to turn up “Get Down Tonight” as we welcome Dr. Beitz to give us a laugh and hope about life with an ostomy.

By Jody Scardillo DNP RN ANP-BC CWOCN
Albany Medical Center- Albany, NY

The Issue

It’s amazing what can happen when a little effort is made.  In April of 2018, the insurer NY Medicaid decreased the allowable quantity for certain ostomy barriers from ten to eight per month.  This included extended wear barriers with and without built- in convexity. This affected many of our patients with ileostomies and urostomies, who required extended wear barriers and /or convexity due to the nature of the stoma or the output.

Most of these patients in my practice require appliance changes every three days even after optimizing the products and accessories they use. The other issue that came up with this is that the ostomy supplier would not break open a box and provide a partial amount, so any patient that used a product that was packaged in multiples of five only received 5 per month instead of the eight that they were approved for. The vendors in my practice were also not able to send alternating amounts.  Dispensing one box on one given month alternating with two boxes the next month was not an option. This would leave an ostomate with only five barriers per month. In reality, the ostomate had enough barriers for half of the month. The coverage for the pouches was twenty per month, which led to a mismatch of products with no solution.

The Success Story

We contacted NY Medicaid by phone and email and collaborated with them so they understood the issues, and the meaning of this for the ostomate.  As clinicians, we all knew this was going to severely impact skin condition and quality of life. After reviewing the information provided, New York Medicaid restored the monthly allowable back to ten barriers.

Lessons Learned

There were several important lessons I learned as a clinician as a result of this situation:

  • Be sure to provide the proper information with a question or request. For example, as a clinician I might describe a product “1-¾ inch cut to fit extended wear convex barrier”. However, the language used by insurers and supply vendors to describe a product is called the HCPCS code (Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System). A4409 is the HCPCS code for a commonly used extended wear convex barrier.
  • This particular insurer was very open to suggestion and willing to listen.  They reversed an important decision when they realized it was not in the best interest of the person with an ostomy. It can never hurt to advocate for yourself or your patient.  The worst thing that can happen is that a situation may not be changed.
  • Under NY Medicaid regulations for beneficiaries who are in need of quantities above the maximum allowable limits they can submit a “prior approval request”. Include a letter of medical necessity from ostomy care provider for the need over the limit.

So, what to do if you have problems with your ostomy supplies?  Reach out to your insurer, your ostomy care provider and your supplier to see what can be done to find a solution together.  You never know unless you try!

To share your advocacy success contact advocacy@ostomy.org

Your stoma care nurse has the specialized training to help you care for your ostomy and address any issues that arise. These professionals are also known as “WOC” (wound, ostomy, and continence) nurses. Stoma care nurses are there to help you make a smooth transition after surgery, and can give you the training you need to care for your ostomy at home. You should consider them your “go-to” resource for ostomy care education, consultation, and troubleshooting.

In honor of WOC Nurse Week, celebrated every year in mid-April, it is important to recognize the ongoing role that stoma care nurses can play in your ostomy care.

When to Contact Your Stoma Care Nurse

Not every ostomy care challenge warrants contacting your stoma care nurse, but certain issues are causes for concern and should be assessed by a trained professional. Connect with your stoma care nurse if you notice any of the following problems.

If you have a colostomy or ileostomy, call your ostomy care nurse if you notice:

  • Skin irritation
  • Recurrent leaks under your pouching system or skin barrier
  • Excessive bleeding of your stoma
  • Blood in your stool
  • A bulge in the skin around your stoma
  • Persistent diarrhea
  • Diarrhea with pain and/or vomiting
  • A stoma that appears to be getting longer

If you have a urostomy, call your ostomy care nurse if you notice:

  • Any sign of urinary tract infection
  • Skin irritation
  • Urine crystals on or around your stoma
  • Recurrent leaks under your pouching system or skin barrier
  • Warty, discolored skin around your stoma
  • Excessive bleeding of your stoma
  • Blood in your urine
  • A bulge in the skin around your stoma
  • A stoma that appears to be getting longer

Finding a Stoma Care Nurse and Showing Your Support

If you do not have a stoma care nurse, you can search to Find a Nurse using your state or zip code on the WOCN Society website. This feature is also accessible by clicking the “Resources” icon in the Peristomal Skin Assessment Guide for Consumers, a free, easy-to-use, digital tool designed to help teens and adults living with an ostomy identify common skin problems, provide next steps for care or management, and prompt when it is appropriate to seek support from a WOC nurse.

How Hollister Secure Start Services Can Help

Hollister Secure Start services offer free customized ostomy support for as long as you need it, regardless of the brand of products you use, including help using the Peristomal Skin Assessment Guide for Consumers. Call us at 1.888.808.7456.

 

Incredible WOC nurses make a daily impact in the lives of people living with an ostomy. Show your support for all they do during WOC Nurse Week (April 14-20, 2019) by sharing a story or photo on social media using the hashtag #WOClove.

 

The Peristomal Skin Assessment Guide for Consumers was funded through an educational grant from Hollister Incorporated.

The information provided herein is not medical advice and is not intended to substitute for the advice of your personal physician or other healthcare provider. This information should not be used to seek help in a medical emergency. If you experience a medical emergency, seek medical treatment in person immediately.

Editor’s note: This educational article is from one of our digital sponsors, Hollister Incorporated. Sponsor support along with donations from readers like you help to maintain our website and the free trusted resources of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Ostomates Provide Insight to Lawmakers on Behalf of UOAA

By Ellyn Mantell and Michael Quear

Left, Ellyn Mantell with UOAA Advocacy Manager Jeanine Gleba, right, outside New Jersey Senator Cory Booker’s office.

UOAA Representative – Ellyn Mantell

There is so much frustration and dissatisfaction around the government right now, that it is easy to forget all of the wonderful things that continue to be done behind the scenes, and I want to share with you my experience in that regard. On Sunday, March 3, 2019, my wonderful support guy, husband, Bruce, and I traveled to Washington, DC to attend the annual Digestive Disease National Coalition meeting. I was asked to be a Patient Advocate accompanying Jeanine Gleba, Advocacy Manager for United Ostomy Associations of America. She and I have a special bond, since she lives in New Jersey and has attended support groups’ meetings with me, and we both have the same goal, which is increasing awareness and getting the most for ostomates.

After meeting key personnel and greeting other attendees on Sunday night, I felt empowered to be part of Team 5 the next day, when we would go to “the Hill!” Monday morning, following a warming breakfast (which we needed since it was windy and oh, so cold walking up toward the Capitol) and a basic logistics session, we headed to the Hart Building, not actually on “the Hill” but very exciting, nonetheless. I saw the offices of Senators about whom I had read or seen on television…a rare opportunity to be in the “Place Where It Happens”!

Our team was awesome and so inspiring! In addition to Jeanine and my presentation (visual aids are great, and my emergency kit pouch was a surefire way for the Legislative Aides to get the point: the necessity for funding for supplies, etc. as well as not being denied benefits for pre-existing conditions) we had two other Patient Advocates. Carolyn was invited by Megan Glynn, Manager of National Programs for the American Liver Foundation, and she is alive because of a living donor liver transplant. This is quite amazing, since the liver is composed of two lobes. One lobe can be transplanted and both donor and donor recipient’s livers will regenerate. It is truly amazing! Carolyn was making a request her life-saving  medications, which cost thousands monthly, may bankrupt a family trying to keep alive the patient they love…a terrible choice to have to make. Generics and off label usage may make a huge difference, but funding is always the issue.

Cheryl Velba then spoke with the Legislative Aides about her Short Bowel Syndrome, she is a Rare Disease Advocate. Surviving the removal of most of her colon and small intestine, she is one of the few to survive such a severe twisting of her bowel. This life-threatening occurrence, and the damage done to her body includes not only digestive issues but ocular ones, as well. She is asking for certain medications, again, costing thousands a month, be switched for generics or off-label usage. We all urged the aides to impress upon the Senators for whom they worked to limit out-of-pocket costs as well as curb current and future payer tactics to shift costs onto the patient.

The Digestive Disease National Coalition stands for Research of Digestive Diseases; Patient Access to Affordable, Quality Health Care; and Prevention and Awareness of Digestive Diseases. Digestive Diseases are chronic and, in many cases, debilitating and disabling. I was deeply honored to be able to bring awareness to the young aides who may not have known anything about our issues before yesterday, but when we were done, had to have learned another slice of life, the struggles of many…and hopefully, they will impress that upon our NJ legislators, Senator Menendez and Senator Booker.

 

UOAA Representative – Michael Quear

I recently attended the Digestive Disease National Coalition Annual Spring Public Policy Forum as a representative for UOAA. Actually, I participated in a group that was meeting with Congressional staff. My group was made up of Pennsylvania residents; so we met with staff of the PA Senate delegations and selected House Members staff. In my group I was the only person with an ostomy, but I certainly had experience with a digestive disease!

I was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis when I was 14; 4 years later I had my surgery – a total colectomy with a permanent ileostomy when I was 18. It’s hard to believe that was 42 years ago. Plus, I certainly knew my audience. I’d had the privilege of serving as professional staff for 20 years on the Committee on Science Space and Technology in the US House of Representatives.

I know these are busy folks and that we would likely have only 20, at best 30 minutes of their time. (We actually only had 15 minutes!) So I thought what are the points I would like them to remember about life for an ostomate and what impacts what they do by allocating funding and how healthcare policy impacts people like us.

First off, show and tell. When you say the word colostomy most people think a bag filled with et cetera. An ileostomy draws a blank stare. So I took along the appliance I wear, so they could feel it, see exactly what it looks like and how it works.  Using my thumb I explained my stoma. I also explained that despite the revolutionary advances in medical diagnostic equipment, prosthetics and drugs that in ostomy products there have not been many major breakthroughs in ostomy solutions, but research funding targeted for ostomy products could change this.

I also talked about the stigma that ostomates often feel.  In general, an ostomy is something some in the public feel is only slightly worse than death.  I was 19 when I heard someone say, “I’d rather be dead than wear a bag….” And I’ve heard similar remarks occasionally thru the years. As it is national Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, I mentioned that people who suspected they had a serious gut issue were afraid to be seen by a doctor because of this stigma. I recommended their boss use his public platform to remind people this is a procedure that saves lives, not ruins them.

Finally, the cost.  I told them the cost of my appliance and that some people need to change it daily, others every 4-5 days. Regardless, over the course of a year costs add up. Therefore, it is important that insurance and government programs cover these costs. When Congress fiddles with health care funding and/or policy they need to think about people like me with serious gut disease in general.

Was it a long day? Yes!  Was it useful – I hope so!

But I think it is one that the staff will remember.