By Sarah Biggart

ostomy pool side

Though having ileostomy surgery 15 years ago gave me my life and freedom back, it does bring its own unique set of concerns and challenges in daily activities and pouch changing schedule. I typically change my full appliance every fifth day.

Change day is day one, and I change my entire pouching system again on day five. I feel confident in my appliance, and this changing system has worked really well for me. Leaks are few and far between; however, as is true for most ostomates, they do happen occasionally. Leaks can happen to all of us, although my longest stretch without a leak is five years – not too shabby!

For me, my daily routine includes showering, exercising, getting sweaty – and weather permitting – swimming and jacuzziing in our community pool with my friends, family and neighbors. Even while doing all of these regularly, a five day wear time holds up for me.

So now, let’s talk what I like to call “Moisture Math”, and the moisture related variables that may affect my wear time.

Travel & Convenience:
If I am going away for the weekend, or traveling, I will do a full pouch change the night before I leave. I have always been a “better safe than sorry” girl, and being an ostomate has reinforced that mindset. If I can get away with not having to do a full pouch change in an unfamiliar setting, I will, just for my own ease and comfort. I’ve been held up traveling before, and it can feel stressful and uncertain. When you’ve had to sleep in an airport, just the added comfort of knowing I have a few days before needing to do a full change is just one less thing to be concerned about. So when setting off on a journey, I like to start with a freshly changed system.

Weather:
I live in a very mild climate, not too much heat and humidity at any given time. My Ostomysecrets® Underwear keeps my pouch away from my body, and it helps limit complaints about excessive heat and moisture. I am a person who enjoys travel and adventures! Sometimes I wind up in warmer, muggier parts of the world. On those sweaty days, walking and exploring in the heat, moisture math joins the pouching equation. A couple of summers ago my family, friends and I spent 10 days in Florida, in July. Between walking an average of 10 miles each day enjoying Walt Disney World, swimming in the pools, afternoon downpours daily and being a general sweaty mess, I went to a very strict every other day change. It was more moisture than I typically deal with, and going back to my better safe than sorry mentality, it seemed like my best course of action. My sting free ostomy care products helped to make frequent pouch changes more gentle on my peristomal skin. I would do my changes at night in our room, in the air conditioning, so that my wafer had plenty of time to adhere to my skin before heading back into the sweltering Florida heat.

Daily Activity:
We all find our own way of managing our changing schedule, most Ostomy Nurses (WOC nurses) would recommend 3‐5 days of wear time. What I would definitely advise against is waiting until you HAVE to change due to a leak. Before you realize you have a problem, waste is coming into contact with your peristomal skin, and that may lead to skin damage. Above all, you want to keep your skin healthy, happy and intact. So when would my daily activity impact my wear time? Again it’s moisture math! I mentioned earlier that I like to swim and jacuzzi; a quick dip for an hour or so is very different than a big day out that involves being in a wet bathing suit all day. If I am planning a big day out on the water, in the pool, at a beach or waterpark, I figure that in to my changing schedule. For example if day one was Thursday, and day three is a big day out involving water, when I get home, I’ll typically shower and do a full change.

I’m always mitigating risk, and making smart, informed decisions regarding my ostomy. Adjusting my routine accordingly to moisture variables helps to keep my peristomal skin healthy allowing me to enjoy whatever life brings my way. Whether you are new to the ostomy world, or a seasoned pro like myself, planning ahead – just a little – may help you to experience life to the fullest.

More information from ConvaTec

Editor’s note: This educational article is from one of our digital sponsors, ConvaTec. Sponsor support along with donations from readers like you help to maintain our website and the free trusted resources of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

How to Keep the Skin Around Your Stoma Healthy

 

 

Keeping the skin around your stoma, or peristomal skin, healthy is important. You can steer clear of many complications by following these simple suggestions from:

Bath and shower tips:

  • You can bathe and shower just as you did before surgery, with your pouch on or off—the choice is up to you.
  • Because soap residue can cause your skin barrier to lift, avoid oil-based and moisturizing soaps.
  • Soap and water will not flow into the stoma and cannot damage it.

Choose a well-fitted ostomy barrier:

  • To help keep the skin around your stoma healthy, it is important that your skin barrier fits properly. Choose a well-fitting pouching system to help prevent irritating stoma contents from coming into contact with your skin.
  • Your ostomy nurse can teach you how to use a measuring guide to determine the size of your stoma and select a cut-to-fit, pre-cut ormoldable barrier.
  • Your stoma size will change up to 10 weeks after surgery, so you will need to measure it periodically.
  • Changes to the abdomen caused by pregnancy, exercise, weight gain/loss or certain medical conditions may also require a new pouching system and/or size.

Changing your pouching system:

  • Make an easy-to-follow schedule for your pouching system. This will ensure your skin barrier is changed before the adhesive has eroded, reducing the chance of urine or feces coming into contact with your skin. Your schedule should be personalized based on your system type and the advice of your doctor or ostomy nurse.
  • At each skin barrier and pouch change, make a habit of looking at the skin around your stoma. Redness, swelling or a rash are signs of irritation. If you see any of these, or other signs of irritation, notify your healthcare provider.
  • Never rip or tear off your skin barrier. Instead, remove the skin barrier gently by beginning with one corner of the barrier and slowly pulling off the remaining adhesive. Adhesive releaser spray and remover wipes can make pouch changes easier and ensure clean skin, ready for your next skin barrier.
  • Make sure your peristomal skin is completely dry before replacing your pouch and skin barrier. Dry skin ensures a good adhesive seal and helps reduce the risk of fungal infection.
  • A skincare routine including skin barrier foam, spray or wipes can help ensure healthy, comfortable peristomal skin for years to come.
  • In hot, humid locations, consider using a pouch with a fabric backing. This will keep the pouch from sticking to your skin and causing skin irritation.

For more information click here.

 

Editor’s note: This educational article is from one of our digital sponsors, ConvaTec. Sponsor support along with donations from readers like you help to maintain our website and the free trusted resources of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Learn how to spot peristomal skin irritation and damage.

 

After your ostomy surgery, your healthcare team likely taught you how to care for your peristomal skin and what it should look like when it is healthy. Ideally, it should be intact without irritation, rash, or redness. The skin around your stoma should look just like the skin on the other side of your abdomen, or anywhere else on your body, free of redness, irritation, or damage. Healthy skin should be the rule, not the exception.

However, if your peristomal skin is irritated or damaged, there may be some signs of a peristomal skin complication (PSC), such as:

  1. Discomfort, itching, soreness, or even pain around the stoma
  2. Recurrent leakage under your pouching system or skin barrier
  3. Excessive bleeding of your stoma – it’s normal for your stoma to slightly bleed after you wash it, but the bleeding should resolve quickly
  4. A bulge in the skin around your stoma
  5. Skin color changes from normal pink or red to pale, bluish purple, or black
  6. A rash around the stoma that is red, or red with bumps – this may be due to a skin infection or sensitivity, or even leakage
  7. Wart-like, pimple-like or blister-like bumps under the skin barrier – this type of irritation can happen any time, even if you’ve used the same product for months or years
  8. Any type of wound or scratch on the peristomal skin

Peristomal Skin Complications — Potential causes and what to do

Irritated and damaged peristomal skin can occur for a variety of reasons. It can be caused by anything from a poor-fitting pouching system, to frequent skin barrier changes, to an allergic reaction to anything that contacts the skin, such as soaps or products used to prepare the peristomal skin. Some studies report up to 75 percent of people with an ostomy experience a PSC.* Although it is a common issue, it should not be ignored.

If you experience any signs of a PSC, contact your stoma care nurse. You should work with your healthcare team to determine the exact cause and the appropriate solution.

For more information on maintaining healthy skin and other topics, click here to visit the Hollister Ostomy Learning Center.

 

* Rapp CG, L Richbourg, JM Thorne. Difficulties Experienced by the Ostomate After Hospital Discharge. JWOCN. 2007;34(1):70-79.

The information provided herein is not medical advice and is not intended to substitute for the advice of your personal physician or other healthcare provider. This information should not be used to seek help in a medical emergency. If you experience a medical emergency, seek medical treatment in person immediately.

Editor’s note: This educational article is from one of our digital sponsors, Hollister Incorporated. Sponsor support along with donations from readers like you help to maintain our website and the free trusted resources of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Skin Hydration Beauty Tips for Living with an Ileostomy

BY ELLYN MANTELL

As a self-avowed makeup and skin care junkie, I strongly believe that looking good is greatly related to feeling good. In fact, makeup and attention to my skin has helped me to get through the years of misery that led to my eventual ileostomy four years ago. As I reflect back, I remember asking my husband to search my handbag for lip gloss when visiting me in the hospital with peritonitis, as soon as I was brought into my room post-surgeries and the like. As soon as I felt well enough to walk around my house, I was applying my skin care regimen and blush, so everyone knew I was fighting my way back. My suitcase, always at the ready for another surgery, contained my stash of the perfect lip color to brighten my pale face for visitors, including my physicians making early morning rounds. Somewhere along the way, I recognized that my ability to heal had a great deal to do with the colorful smile I could put on my face!

It is my belief that although we ostomates can live a very full and fulfilling life, some things will just take a little extra attention, and looking our best may be one of those areas. With that in mind, I am planning on contributing information about beauty and fashion, and have named my blog/post/column Beauty and the Ostomy! Look for it in the next Phoenix Ostomy Magazine. In our case, the ostomy is not “the beast” but the beautiful incarnation of our body to heal itself and our spirit, and our appreciation of our stomas is parallel to Belle’s appreciation for her Beast!

What does an ostomy do to our system that impacts our facial appearance, you may be wondering? I believe that our loss of fluids, particularly for ileostomates, is major, so we need to talk about moisture and hydration. Although I am always looking for new products to rejuvenate and enhance the aging skin, I am very aware that all ostomates need to be mindful of how to get well-needed moisture and hydration into the skin, regardless of our age.

From childhood, my skin has always been on the dry side, and I accepted that reality into adulthood. But a very lovely aesthetician informed me that with proper treatment, I could have much healthier skin, since skin that holds moisture, has more of a chance of fighting illness. The glow of healthy skin reveals a canvas ready to be painted or just admired by itself. Whether valid or not, I became determined to make some important changes, and I truly believe good skin care yields results, and that is wonderful!

How Do We Absorb this Very Valuable and Sometimes Unattainable Moisture?

Like anything worth doing, there are steps to absorbing moisture. First, we must drink lots of fluids, primarily water. Many beverages do not add hydration, and may even leach hydration from our bodies. Some believe coffee, tea and soft drinks are culprits. I believe, however, that in moderation, they are fine, as long as lots of water is added to the daily diet. I love hot water, with or without lemon, and drink it all day, along with cold water, with or without lemon. UOAA’s Diet & Nutrition Guide even has recipes for hydration drinks and more ostomate specific information. You may be interested to know that fatigue is lessened, especially midday, by binging on water, rather than a fattening treat.

In caring for our skin, ostomates should use a gentle cleanser most nights, but 2-3 times a week, an exfoliant is a great addition to the routine. The exfoliant can be chemical (vitamin c or acids) or natural, such as grainy or mealy. The skin will glow and the new soft skin will let you know your skin is ready to receive moisture!

Serums are a vehicle of introducing treatment to the skin, and can add vitamins, minerals, usable acids, etc. Every day I read more and more about the addition of serums to beauty regimens, and since they are light and easy to apply, I use them morning and night.

Next, we need to use moisturizing products, and there is a myriad from which to choose. Lotions are lightweight, and wonderful for younger skin, which requires less hydration and may be producing much-needed oils, whereas creams are recommended for the aging skin.

Lastly, sunscreen every day, and oh, by the way, sunscreen, even when it is cloudy! The debates go on about what is the appropriate designated number of SPF (Sun Protection Factor) but my sources tell me 30-70 is best, taking into consideration that any less than 30 isn’t worth the product, and any higher number than 70 is just loading on more chemicals. And if we are in the sun for a long period of time, we should reapply as the day goes on. Be sure to wash off sunscreen and all makeup before bed, apply a night cream for optimal hydration…and let your skin breathe and rebuild during sleep!

(editor’s note: Peristomal skin issues are a whole different issue beyond beauty regiments and critical to medical wellbeing the link above has more information on that topic.)

Please write to me at ellynmantell@aol.com with any beauty and fashion questions you have. I am very interested in what interests YOU!