Why they Happen and What to do

Elaine O’Rourke and Ostomy Nurse and Phoenix Magazine columnist Anita Prinz discuss ostomy leaks, reasons why they happen, what to do and how to help with skin breakdown. There is lots of valuable information in this interview for even those who have had their ostomies for many years. Elaine has had her ileostomy since 2005 due to Crohn’s disease and has had her fair share of leaks over the years until finding the right pouching system for her. If you are having persistent leaks then you should always consult with an ostomy nurse who can help find a solution for you.

You can find Elaine on Facebook and her “3 simple ways to overcome fears about your Ostomy” program at www.ElaineOrourke.com/ostomyprograms/

It can be hard to talk openly about living with an ostomy, but at Coloplast, our mission guides us in our everyday work and our employees embody a passion around hearing real-life stories from people with intimate healthcare needs. We have gotten to know Joel through his story, his resilience to keep fighting, and we are proud to stand with the ostomy community in raising awareness of ALL people living with an ostomy.

Join us, Joel and ostomates across the nation in participating in the Virtual Run for Resilience for the 10th Anniversary of Ostomy Awareness Day (OAD) on Saturday, October 03, 2020.

Joel’s Story

I was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease at 17 years old. Nine years later I had a very bad flare up that put me in the hospital fighting for my life. When the doctors first told me that the best option was to have ileostomy surgery, I was so upset but I was in so much pain I was hoping that it would make me feel better. When I finally woke up from surgery and realized I had an ileostomy – I cried. I didn’t even want to look at it. It took some time, but I got used to it, my stoma saved my life.

After surgery, the scariest thing for me was not knowing how I was going to move forward in life with an ileostomy. As soon as I got out the hospital, I began to work out every day, even if it was for 25-30 minutes. In 6 months, I was able to build my strength up enough to complete and graduate an intense 4-month police academy. Today, I continue to do what I love and recently completed my personal training certificate.

I am telling my story to tell you that you should never give up on something – even if it seems impossible. Stay strong, stay positive and keep pushing forward!

I am excited to walk, run with you all on Ostomy Awareness Day for the Run for Resilience and hope you will join in with me! I created this video, “Tips on Running with an Ostomy” for you all. I am always looking to connect, and support others so feel free to reach out to me if you need help, want to chat, or just need some support. You can find me on Instagram at @crohnically.fit

Join us for the Run for Resilience

Having an ostomy should not hold you back from participating in the run/walk. Our Coloplast® Care team is here to support you if you want to chat, just give us a call at 1-877-858-2656. We also have resources on our website on sports and exercise.

Coloplast is proud to be a part of the effort to build awareness that ostomies are lifesavers, visit our website to request a free sticker for OAD and join our contest for an opportunity to win some swag! We can’t wait to run/walk with you on October 03! Make sure to follow us on Instagram @coloplast.us for updates leading up to the event!

 

*Joel is a Coloplast product user who has received compensation from Coloplast to provide this information. Each person’s situation is unique, so your experience may not be the same. Talk to your healthcare provider about whether this product is right for you.

 

Editor’s Note: this blog post was provided by Coloplast Corp, a Gold Sponsor of UOAA’s annual Run for Resilience Ostomy 5K events that benefit UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization

 

It’s summer and you should not let your ostomy stop you from swimming, exercising and having fun in the sun. Sweat and lots of time in the water can decrease the number of days between pouching system changes for some but there are some simple things you can do that can help. Elaine shares in this video several tips to get your wafer to stick longer. Check out her advice to prolong adherence of your ostomy pouching system especially when swimming, exercising and sweating more this summer.

UOAA also has more information on swimming and advocacy tools for any issues with access in public facilities.

Make sure to grab your FREE GUIDE: ‘3 simple ways to eliminate fears about your ostomy” by visiting Elaine’s website www.ElaineOrourke.com

Elaine O’Rourke is the creator of the program “Surviving To Thriving: Overcoming Ostomy Challenges So You Can Live a FulFilling Life”. She is a certified Yoga Therapist & Teacher since 2003, Sound Healer, EFT & Reiki Practitioner, Recording Artist and International Retreat Leader. Her lighthearted and fun personality shines through her teachings/programs as she loves to inspire others. She is a contributing writer to the national Phoenix Magazine and UOAA, presenter at the UOAA National Conference and speaker at Girls with Guts retreat.  

Web: www.elaineorourke.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ostomyibdlife/ 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/elaineorourkeyoga/ 

Email: Elaine@ElaineOrourke.com 

Having an ostomy should not prevent you from swimming. Below are some helpful tips to get you feeling confident in the water, whether it’s in your own backyard pool or at a beach.

  • You can swim or be in the water while wearing your pouching system. Remember, your pouching system is water-resistant and is designed not to leak with the proper seal. Water will not harm or enter your stoma.
  • Prior to swimming, make sure your seal is secure.
  • Empty your pouch before swimming. Also, ensure your wafer has been on for at least an hour prior to getting wet. If you are nervous about output, eat a few hours before jumping in.
  • If you use a filtered pouch, use a filter cover sticker on your deodorizing filter to prevent water from entering the pouch. You can remove the cover once you are dry.
  • Wear what makes you feel the most comfortable. Swimming with an ostomy should be fun and worry-free regardless of what you’re wearing. Shop with confidence knowing there are so many options that could work for you.
  • Always carry extra supplies in case you are somewhere where supplies may not be available.
  • For extra peace of mind, use barrier strips if you will be swimming for an extended time.

me+ Team Member Tip: “I tell people who are scared to swim with an ostomy to spend a few hours in the tub on a lazy day. If your pouching system holds up to that, then the pool should be a breeze.” ~Sarah B.

Editor’s note: This article is from one of our digital sponsors, ConvaTec. Sponsor support along with donations from readers like you help to maintain our website and the free trusted resources of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

By Ellyn Mantell

While walking this morning it occurred to me that for many Ostomates, the heat is very challenging. Ileostomates, in particular, are prone to dehydration because our stoma is always productive. In Mother Nature’s inimitable creation, the colon, or large bowel, is responsible for absorbing fluids and allowing them to be reabsorbed into the body. Since ileostomates either no longer have a colon or it is no longer being used, the precious fluids are flushed from the body through the stoma. Hence the rapid filling and refilling of the pouch, which can be worse in the heat.

Naturally, drinking water is advised. UOAA’s new ostomy nutrition guide recommends you “Make a habit of drinking water throughout the day. At the same time, limit or avoid beverages with added sugars and artificial colors and sweeteners.”  Many of us may have difficulty drinking enough to support our anatomy, so we need to be mindful of symptoms that we are lacking the hydration/dehydration balance.

Some symptoms of dehydration include headache, fatigue, dark or decreased urine, lack of concentration, dry mouth, feeling disoriented, shortness of breath, dry skin, stomach cramps. Additionally, leg cramps, loss of appetite, drowsiness, tingling in fingertips and muscle weakness are all concomitant to dehydration.

Learning to live with the chronic dehydration possibility presented to ostomates is certainly attainable. For me, since I do not have a high blood pressure issue which might preclude adding salt, it means adding it frequently at meals. It is strange to servers at restaurants when I ask for the salt shaker, and many have asked if I mean the pepper shaker? We have become a salt-resistant society. But there are those of us who need it for our fluid balance. Additionally, I have a handful of a salty snack before bed, such as pretzels, since nighttime muscle cramps can be very painful and cause sleep deprivation. I keep a bottle of tonic water in the refrigerator, as well as a jar of pickles for those times when nothing else works. For muscle cramps I recommend an over the counter foam moisture. The manufacturers recommend using it prophylactically at night, but I have found it usually very fast-acting when I have foot or leg cramps, so I apply as needed.

Many Ostomates swear by sports drinks like Gatorade, but truthfully, although I have a bottle in the refrigerator at all times in case of fever, I find it difficult to drink. However, if presented with the option of drinking it or winding up in the Emergency Room for fluids, I will imbibe gladly! It’s recommended you dilute sports drinks to reduce the sugar content as well. At some of our Support Group meetings I have heard of many different electrolyte balancing drinks and powders, so you may find one that works for you.

UOAA recommends you drink 8–10, eight-ounce glasses of water/fluid daily. If you have a urostomy this also helps prevent UTIs and keeps urine diluted. Concentrated urine also can cause odor.

View UOAA’s Eating with an Ostomy Guide for more hydration tips such as avoiding excess caffeine, eating foods with a higher water content and sipping your liquids slowly.

It has been recommended that Ostomates drink more than simply water, since it flushes through the system and little gets absorbed before it exits through our pouch. Drink with meals, since food slows down the transport of fluids. Bring fluids with you when you are out and about, since being busy may cause us to forget the responsibility we have to stay hydrated. Lastly, in addition to feeling awful when we are dehydrated, being in that state puts a great deal of pressure on our kidneys, and can lead to kidney failure and lightheadedness, which can lead to falling.

Although this sounds ominous for summer fun, being mindful and smart will help us to relax and enjoy ourselves…after all, with the Covid experience, we have learned to grab the good and be grateful we are as healthy as we are!

 

Ellyn Mantell is a UOAA advocate and Affiliated Support Group leader from New Jersey. You can follow her personal blog at morethanmyostomy

A patient who did not know what to expect walks you through the process (with photos)

By AnneMarie Finn

According to UOAA information on this website, a urostomy is “a surgically created opening in the abdominal wall through which urine passes. A urostomy may be performed when the bladder is either not functioning or has to be removed. There are several different types of surgeries, but the most common are ileal conduit and colonic conduit. Reasons for surgery include bladder cancer, spinal cord injuries, malfunction such as chronic infection of the bladder and birth defects such as spina bifida.” Great definition, but what does it mean? When I was told I would need a radical cystectomy, leading to an ileal conduit I had no clue. The following is my experience.

Because of bladder cancer, my bladder needed to be removed and a new way to pass urine created. Due to the location of the tumor, my urethra was also removed so my surgeon and I settled on an ileal conduit, a conventional urostomy. It is called ileal conduit because a piece of the ileum, or small bowel, is used to make a passage for urine to go from the kidneys and ureters out of the body. The other end is brought out through a hole in the abdomen where urine exits through a stoma (more on that shortly). It is known as an incontinent urinary diversion because you cannot control the urine. As a result, a collection bag or pouch hangs from your abdomen to catch the urine. The pouch is not visible as it is worn under your clothes. Still not clear? It wasn’t for me either.

A couple of days before surgery, I met with an ostomy nurse at the hospital where I would be receiving my surgery. She marked where the stoma would be placed. She saw how I wore my pants. She had me sit, stand, lay down, and bend over, She drew a mark with a marker about 2.5 inches to the right and 3 inches down from my navel and covered it with a waterproof dressing. This would guide the surgeon as to the optimal spot to place the stoma. The surgeon had the ultimate call on where the stoma went, depending on the surgery itself. I also met with a nurse for a pre-op appointment. They went through the typical exam and then explained the ERAS protocol to me. ERAS, Enhanced Recovery After Surgery, is used at my hospital for radical cystectomies. They no longer use a bowel prep. You drink a high carbohydrate drink in the hours prior to your surgery. They get you up walking and feed you by the day after surgery. The goal is to keep your bowels working. This reduces the length of hospital stay and the number of complications.

This is major surgery. It is considered one of the most complex cancer surgeries performed. My surgery took 7 hours. They removed the bladder, urethra, uterus, cervix, fallopian tubes, an ovary, and some lymph nodes. When I woke up, I had a bag, a large incision with more than 30 staples and a Jackson Pratt (JP) drain on my abdomen. I also had intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) devices on my legs, my spa legs. Blood clots are a common side effect of a radical cystectomy. Because of that, I also received daily prophylaxis blood thinner shots in my belly for 30 days. I was not in a great deal of pain which was easily managed with Tylenol. I was definitely weak, but otherwise ok. I went home in 4 days, on my own with my urostomy.

The stoma is the badge of the urostomy. My stoma is about one inch in diameter. It is pretty round, It sticks out. It sometimes moves in and out. You can’t feel it. It has been described as looking like a rosebud. It is red. This is where the urine exits the body. You have no control over it. Sometimes it will also expel mucus. Some people name them. I did.
Rudolph, my red, round stoma

You use a urine collection pouch, or bag, to catch the urine. The hospital will send you home with some so you do not need to have them on hand before you get home. There are many different brands. In fact, until I found what worked best for me, I tried most of them. My pouch is about 8 inches long, 6-7 inches wide and has a 1-2 inch closable spout on the bottom. It also is a deep convex bag as my stoma does not stick out very far and it helps protect my skin. I prefer the clear bag so I can see the stoma and center it when I put it on. There are both one and two-piece bags. I have used both. One-piece pouches have the bag and a skin barrier attached. The skin barrier has adhesive, also called a flange or wafer, that sticks to your skin. There is a hole that goes over the stoma. Some are pre-cut, some are not. If not, you must cut a hole slightly bigger than your stoma before putting it on. There are also two-piece systems. The bags are separate from the skin barrier. They are attached by a Tupperware-like seal. You can leave the skin barrier on and take off the pouch.

Front and back of 1 piece, deep convex pouch

I change my pouch every 3 days. I like to remove the old pouch and take a shower with it off. I feel so free. To remove, I use an adhesive removal spray and wipes to clean the skin. I shower and wash the area around the stoma with soap and dandruff shampoo, which contains Zinc. Some people wash with a vinegar and water combo. If I change without showering, I just use plain water to rinse. After showering, I use a hairdryer on the lowest setting to dry the skin around the stoma so the wafer sticks to it. Drying your skin is important. I have some skin issues so I also use a skin barrier protective sheet, that I cut a hole to match the opening of the wafer, and a cohesive seal.

Protective Sheet with hole cut out and Cohesive Seal

Some people use powders, paste, barrier wipes, etc. I do not. It took a lot of trial and error to find what worked best for me. You need to find what works for you. One of the best ways to do this is to work with an ostomy nurse. They can help you navigate ordering and finding the best system for you.
At night, I use the urinary drainage bag they sent me home with from the hospital. For me, it works the best. There are several brands of night bags and even jugs. I put it on the floor next to my bed inside of a small wastebasket. This has been key as the drain has opened (or been left open) and the wastebasket collected the urine, preventing a rug catastrophe. I am a very active sleeper and I am not really hindered too much from my bag. I am able to sleep on my back, sides, and stomach. Don’t be afraid to sleep. People add their own tubing and tube placement strategies. Use whatever works for you. I also highly recommend a waterproof mattress pad. Mattresses are expensive. I also use the night drainage bag on long car trips. I don’t have to stop and use those disgusting public toilets. I even used it during the Avengers finale. I was probably the only person in the theater who did not have to get up to use the facilities during the movie! People were actually jealous.

Night Drainage Pouch

I honestly can’t even feel my pouch. I empty it every 1-2 hours, depending on how much I drink. Sometimes there is a “ghost” feeling where my bladder used to be making it feel like I have to pee. Ah, the good old days. It is actually a weird sensation drinking a lot and not feeling like I have to go. The bag is not noticeable under my clothes. I really do wear what I wore before surgery: jeans, sheath dresses, shorts, and bathing suits. I am still sexually active. Having gone through this experience with my wonderful caregiver, my husband, has brought us closer. Most importantly, I am cancer-free.

If you are wondering how to do core exercises safely with an ostomy and activate your core muscles this is the video for you. Peristomal hernias is one issue people hope to avoid through core strengthening. More information on developing hernias after ostomy surgery can be found as part of UOAA’s New Ostomy Patient Guide.

If you are active and have fully recovered from surgery here are simple exercises anyone can do as well as some exercises you can build up to. Always consult with your doctor before starting an exercise regimen.

Make sure to grab your FREE GUIDE: ‘3 simple ways to eliminate fears about your ostomy” by visiting Elaine’s website www.ElaineOrourke.com

Elaine O’Rourke is the creator of the program “Surviving To Thriving: Overcoming Ostomy Challenges So You Can Live a FulFilling Life”. She is a certified Yoga Therapist & Teacher since 2003, Sound Healer, EFT & Reiki Practitioner, Recording Artist and International Retreat Leader. Her lighthearted and fun personality shines through her teachings/programs as she loves to inspire others. She is a contributing writer to the national Phoenix Magazine and UOAA, presenter at the UOAA National Conference and speaker at Girls with Guts retreat.  

Web: www.elaineorourke.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ostomyibdlife/ 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/elaineorourkeyoga/ 

Email: Elaine@ElaineOrourke.com 

Summer is coming and it is the perfect time to not let your ostomy define who you are or what you are able to do. Enjoy these wellness tips by Elaine O’Rourke. In this video Elaine shares her insights into diet, getting moving again, confidence and even her passion for surfing.

“Look at your mindset, that may be what is holding you back not your ostomy.”

 

Make sure to grab your FREE GUIDE: ‘3 simple ways to eliminate fears about your ostomy” by visiting Elaine’s website www.ElaineOrourke.com

Elaine O’Rourke is the creator of the program “Surviving To Thriving: Overcoming Ostomy Challenges So You Can Live a FulFilling Life”. She is a certified Yoga Therapist & Teacher since 2003, Sound Healer, EFT & Reiki Practitioner, Recording Artist and International Retreat Leader. Her lighthearted and fun personality shines through her teachings/programs as she loves to inspire others. She is a contributing writer to the national Phoenix Magazine and UOAA, presenter at the UOAA National Conference and speaker at Girls with Guts retreat.  

Web: www.elaineorourke.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ostomyibdlife/ 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/elaineorourkeyoga/ 

Email: Elaine@ElaineOrourke.com 

By Elaine O’Rourke

With the increased and heightened attention on the coronavirus, it is naturally creating a lot of fear and anxiety. This fear not only affects the mind but also the body. Right now, you want to keep your immune system strong and focus on calming your mind and nervous system and of course use necessary precautions.

Proper Breathing, as well as other techniques, will help reduce cortisol levels (one of the stress hormones that can wreak havoc in your body) and helps promote the relaxation response in the body.

Deep focused breathing has so many benefits and there is a lot more science behind what the ancient yogi’s already knew. As a long time yoga teacher, I know firsthand how amazing proper breathing is. I credit it for helping me recover from surgeries much faster and for regaining strength. Wim Hof (the Iceman) has been instrumental in recent years for promoting the benefits through his method. Many scientific studies have been done on him proving that you can control the autonomic nervous system and immune response. The following is a basic guided breathing and relaxation video. 

Make sure to grab your FREE GUIDE: ‘3 simple ways to eliminate fears about your ostomy” by visiting Elaine’s website www.ElaineOrourke.com

Elaine O’Rourke is the creator of the program “Surviving To Thriving: Overcoming Ostomy Challenges So You Can Live a FulFilling Life”. She is a certified Yoga Therapist & Teacher since 2003, Sound Healer, EFT & Reiki Practitioner, Recording Artist and International Retreat Leader. Her lighthearted and fun personality shines through her teachings/programs as she loves to inspire others. She is a contributing writer to the national Phoenix Magazine and UOAA, presenter at the UOAA National Conference and speaker at Girls with Guts retreat.  

Web: www.elaineorourke.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ostomyibdlife/ 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/elaineorourkeyoga/ 

Email: Elaine@ElaineOrourke.com 

Let’s Debunk These Common Ostomy Myths

 

 

 

After ostomy surgery, you may find helpful tips from other people living with an ostomy in online communities, support groups, forums and more. Weeding through the fact and fiction can be difficult. We asked certified ostomy nurses to outline some of the most common myths they hear to provide you with the truth about living with an ostomy.

 

Myth: Only use the ostomy pouching system that you were fitted with in the hospital or doctor’s office.

Fact: In the weeks and months following ostomy surgery, you may find your stoma and body changing. In the first few weeks and months post-surgery, your ostomy pouching system may need to be changed also.

 

Myth: All ostomy products are the same. It doesn’t matter what type of pouching system you wear.

Fact: There are a large variety of ostomy products available to fit the needs of each person living with an ostomy.

 

Myth: Your stoma should not change size a few months after surgery.

Fact: In the weeks and months following ostomy surgery, your stoma may change in size and appearance.

 

Myth: Having skin irritation is a normal way of life with an ostomy.

Fact: If the skin around your stoma becomes damaged, it could be painful and lead to infection. Prevention is the key to maintaining both healthy peristomal skin and your comfort.

 

Myth: If you have an ostomy, your significant other will not love you the same way.

Fact: It is common to have anxiety about relationships following ostomy surgery. Be open and honest with your partner about any concerns you have. Remember, having an ostomy is nothing to be ashamed of.

 

Myth: Odor is a part of life when you have an ostomy.

Fact: You will become more comfortable with your ostomy pouch over time, and will gain confidence in its ability to retain odors.

 

Myth: Now that I have an ostomy, I am no longer able to enjoy the foods I love.

Fact: Right out of surgery, you may be more sensitive to foods than you will be in six months. Slowly add different foods to your diet, and pay attention to your body’s response.

 

Myth: I have a colostomy or ileostomy so I shouldn’t be passing anything from my rectum. 

Fact: The colon or rectum may produce mucus even after ostomy surgery. If you have questions about your output, contact your healthcare professional.

 

Myth: I can’t get my pouch or wafer wet, which means I can’t enjoy water activities or bathe with my pouching system in place.

Fact: You can shower, go swimming, or even get in the hot tub with your pouching system in place. If using a pouch with a filter, cover the filter with the covers provided.

 

Myth: Don’t shower without your ostomy system off.

Fact: You can shower with or without an ostomy system in place.

 

Myth: An ostomy prevents you from wearing stylish, form-fitting clothing. People will be able to see that I have an ostomy.

Fact: Before you had ostomy surgery, did you notice an ostomy pouch on other people in public? Probably not. Try a wrap or special undergarments to help conceal your pouch and increase your confidence.

 

Myth: Insurance doesn’t cover ostomy care, so I am paying out of pocket for my supplies.

Fact: Contact your insurance coverage provider to understand what your insurance plan covers and pays for ostomy supplies.

 

Myth: You should rinse and/or reuse your pouches.

Fact: It is not recommended to rinse or reuse ostomy systems, pouches or wafers. Water can make the barrier break down faster and damage the filter of the filtered pouches.

 

Myth: People living with an ostomy cannot fly, because the cabin pressure can cause the pouch to fail.

Fact: People living with an ostomy can fly, ride in a car, or use any other mode of travel.

 

More information from ConvaTec

Editor’s note: This educational article is from one of our digital sponsors, ConvaTec. Sponsor support along with donations from readers like you help to maintain our website and the free trusted resources of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.