Urostomy and Continent Diversion Patients Find Support and Education from Peers at UOAA.

By Ed Pfueller, UOAA

May is Bladder Cancer Awareness Month. According to the American Cancer Society, this year more than 80,000 people are expected to be diagnosed and approximately 17,000 will die as a result of this disease.

Bladder cancer survivors are a major part of the ostomy community represented by United Ostomy Associations of America (UOAA) through support groups, educational resources, and national advocacy.

For those with this cancer who require their bladder to be removed, a urostomy or continent diversion may be necessary. A urostomy is a surgically created opening in the abdominal wall through which urine passes. A urostomy may be performed when the bladder is either not functioning or has to be removed. There are several different types of surgeries, but the most common are ileal conduit and colonic conduit.

Be Prepared

Our new ostomy patient guide is available to all who need it and it is a great overview of what to expect. Our urostomy guide has even more in-depth information. If you have a medical question contact your doctor or nurse, in you have a quality of life question- UOAA likely has the answers.

If you or someone you know is in need lifesaving ostomy surgery remember-you are not alone. 725,000- 1 million people in the U.S. of all ages and backgrounds live with an ostomy. Connecting with UOAA resources is critical. Especially seek out one of our almost 300 UOAA Affiliated Ostomy Support Groups in the U.S. before, or shortly after, your surgery. Peer support and preparation can put you on the path to success in what will be a challenging time both emotionally, sexually and physically. Ask if the hospital has an ostomy nurse and insist on having your stoma placement marked before surgery. These and other self-advocacy tools are paramount and outlined in our Ostomy Patient Bill of Rights.

Other surgical options after bladder removal may not require an external pouching system such a continent pouch, or orthotopic neobladder. Continent diversion surgery needs lifestyle consultation and thought before being seriously considered since these surgeries are extensive and have possible complications including incontinence.

Read more in-depth here about continent urinary diversions such as an Indiana Pouch. This uses the creation of an intestinal reservoir with a catheterizable channel that is brought from the reservoir to the skin with the creation of a stoma. The Indiana pouch has become the predominant urinary diversion for patients who desire continence.

Another diversion is the Neobladder. The creation of a reservoir (neobladder) that is surgically connected to the urethra. It is created for those who do not want a stoma and wish to void per the urethra.

Before surgery, it is also best to learn some facts about living with an ostomy. After the healing period outlined by your surgeon you can swim, bathe, be intimate, travel, and embrace a new normal life. For more information read our Tips for a Succesful Recovery After Ostomy Surgery and use it as a roadmap for success.

Urostomy Tips

For help getting a good night’s sleep with a urostomy, night drainage systems are available to collect and store urine so can sleep without having to empty your bag multiple times during the night.

Unlike some people with gastrointestinal ostomies there are usually there are no dietary restrictions and foods can be enjoyed as before. It is suggested that 8-10 glasses of fluid per day be consumed to help decrease the chance of kidney infection. We also have information on how to retain an acid PH balance of your urine.

Sexual function is influenced by the reasons for which the urostomy is performed. The urostomy itself should not interfere with normal sexual activity or pregnancy. UOAA Affiliated Support Groups are available for individuals and partners seeking emotional support. Our Sexuality and Intimacy Guide may be helpful in facing any new challenges.

Connect with a Community

If you have not had the chance to connect with others with a urostomy, UOAA’s 7th National Conference is a unique opportunity. Urostomates will find camaraderie and education with others from around the country. A few of the urostomy specific sessions include a Basic Urostomy session with Dr. Edouard Trabulsi, MD, FACS and a urostomy meet and greet. There is also a “Ask the WOC Nurse – Urostomy” session with Marie Brown-Etris, RN, CWOCN and other general sessions to get your urostomy or continent diversion questions answered.

This Bladder Cancer Awareness month you can send us your photo and urostomy survival story on social media and we may share your patient story. You may also be interested to know that people also have a urostomy due to spinal cord injuries, malfunction such as chronic infection of the bladder and birth defects such as spina bifida.

Celebrate Bladder Cancer Awareness Month and connect with the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN) on all the ways to make an impact. You’re also invited to join with UOAA for Ostomy Awareness Day on October 5, 2019 or participate in one of our Run for Resilience Ostomy 5k events around the country. We hope you’ll consider a donation, joining our advocacy efforts, or taking part in a support group to give back to the next cancer survivor in need.

 

Your stoma care nurse has the specialized training to help you care for your ostomy and address any issues that arise. These professionals are also known as “WOC” (wound, ostomy, and continence) nurses. Stoma care nurses are there to help you make a smooth transition after surgery, and can give you the training you need to care for your ostomy at home. You should consider them your “go-to” resource for ostomy care education, consultation, and troubleshooting.

In honor of WOC Nurse Week, celebrated every year in mid-April, it is important to recognize the ongoing role that stoma care nurses can play in your ostomy care.

When to Contact Your Stoma Care Nurse

Not every ostomy care challenge warrants contacting your stoma care nurse, but certain issues are causes for concern and should be assessed by a trained professional. Connect with your stoma care nurse if you notice any of the following problems.

If you have a colostomy or ileostomy, call your ostomy care nurse if you notice:

  • Skin irritation
  • Recurrent leaks under your pouching system or skin barrier
  • Excessive bleeding of your stoma
  • Blood in your stool
  • A bulge in the skin around your stoma
  • Persistent diarrhea
  • Diarrhea with pain and/or vomiting
  • A stoma that appears to be getting longer

If you have a urostomy, call your ostomy care nurse if you notice:

  • Any sign of urinary tract infection
  • Skin irritation
  • Urine crystals on or around your stoma
  • Recurrent leaks under your pouching system or skin barrier
  • Warty, discolored skin around your stoma
  • Excessive bleeding of your stoma
  • Blood in your urine
  • A bulge in the skin around your stoma
  • A stoma that appears to be getting longer

Finding a Stoma Care Nurse and Showing Your Support

If you do not have a stoma care nurse, you can search to Find a Nurse using your state or zip code on the WOCN Society website. This feature is also accessible by clicking the “Resources” icon in the Peristomal Skin Assessment Guide for Consumers, a free, easy-to-use, digital tool designed to help teens and adults living with an ostomy identify common skin problems, provide next steps for care or management, and prompt when it is appropriate to seek support from a WOC nurse.

How Hollister Secure Start Services Can Help

Hollister Secure Start services offer free customized ostomy support for as long as you need it, regardless of the brand of products you use, including help using the Peristomal Skin Assessment Guide for Consumers. Call us at 1.888.808.7456.

 

Incredible WOC nurses make a daily impact in the lives of people living with an ostomy. Show your support for all they do during WOC Nurse Week (April 14-20, 2019) by sharing a story or photo on social media using the hashtag #WOClove.

 

The Peristomal Skin Assessment Guide for Consumers was funded through an educational grant from Hollister Incorporated.

The information provided herein is not medical advice and is not intended to substitute for the advice of your personal physician or other healthcare provider. This information should not be used to seek help in a medical emergency. If you experience a medical emergency, seek medical treatment in person immediately.

Editor’s note: This educational article is from one of our digital sponsors, Hollister Incorporated. Sponsor support along with donations from readers like you help to maintain our website and the free trusted resources of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

If you are facing a potential surgery leading to an ostomy, you naturally will have many questions and concerns. It is important to voice your questions and concerns to your healthcare professional. Gather as much information as you possibly can while you are in the hospital. Having a friend or family member with you can be helpful as they can also assist in remembering information and understand how you will need to care for your body and pouching system after you leave the hospital.

However, despite education offered both before and after surgery, statistics show that as many as 46% of patients still feel underprepared when they’re discharged from the hospital. If you have already had your surgery and are back home, feeling a lack of confidence, ill-equipped, or underprepared, you are not alone.

Many ostomates are unsure of how to care for themselves and their pouching system following their surgery. That is why WOC nurses recommend that ostomy patients be connected to additional resources after they’ve left the hospital.

Coloplast Care is a comprehensive support program that gives people with an ostomy personal support throughout their life.

Having the support of Care, you’re not travelling the journey of living life with an ostomy by yourself. – Keagan

There are so many questions that you don’t know to ask until you start life as an ostomate. Coloplast Care helped me stay focused on what was important. – Mike

Coloplast Care covers everything from the Basics, such as: ‘What is an Ostomy?’ and ‘Before Surgery’, to ‘Routines’ and ‘Lifestyle’. Not only are there helpful articles and real-life stories from others on the website and through emails, individuals are partnered with a dedicated advisor for personalized support.

One of the best parts of Care is that you can actually speak with a person. They were listening to what I was trying to do and what my concerns were, and coming up with different solutions they felt would work for me. – Mike

Having the ability to access the Coloplast Care website is a great resource. The reality is that your healthcare provider isn’t available 24/7 around the clock. – Keagan

Gathering the right tools, resources, and community around you following your ostomy surgery will determine your ability to succeed and live a full life as an ostomate. Whether figuring out what to wear to the beach, how to prevent leakage, or learning how to use your appliance, there are resources available to you 24/7. You are not alone in this new chapter of your life.

Visit Coloplast Care to enroll and get your support program started.

 

Mike and Keagan have been compensated by Coloplast to provide this information.

Editor’s note: This article is from one of our digital sponsors, Coloplast. Sponsor support along with donations from readers like you help to maintain our website and the free trusted resources of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.