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It’s summer and you should not let your ostomy stop you from swimming, exercising and having fun in the sun. Sweat and lots of time in the water can decrease the number of days between pouching system changes for some but there are some simple things you can do that can help. Elaine shares in this video several tips to get your wafer to stick longer. Check out her advice to prolong adherence of your ostomy pouching system especially when swimming, exercising and sweating more this summer.

UOAA also has more information on swimming and advocacy tools for any issues with access in public facilities.

Make sure to grab your FREE GUIDE: ‘3 simple ways to eliminate fears about your ostomy” by visiting Elaine’s website www.ElaineOrourke.com

Elaine O’Rourke is the creator of the program “Surviving To Thriving: Overcoming Ostomy Challenges So You Can Live a FulFilling Life”. She is a certified Yoga Therapist & Teacher since 2003, Sound Healer, EFT & Reiki Practitioner, Recording Artist and International Retreat Leader. Her lighthearted and fun personality shines through her teachings/programs as she loves to inspire others. She is a contributing writer to the national Phoenix Magazine and UOAA, presenter at the UOAA National Conference and speaker at Girls with Guts retreat.  

Web: www.elaineorourke.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ostomyibdlife/ 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/elaineorourkeyoga/ 

Email: Elaine@ElaineOrourke.com 

Living with an Ostomy and IBD led her to become an Unexpected Beauty Queen and Advocate

 

Hi Everyone! My name is Robin Brown, I’m a 40-year-old wife, momma & farm girl. I also happen to have an ostomy and the title of Mrs. Washington World America!

My relationship with my guts has been a long battle….even as a child I suffered from severe ulcerative colitis symptoms but I wasn’t officially diagnosed until I had my first bowel resection at age 21 as result from an infection following an appendectomy. I lost my marriage and some guts but I finally got some answers…or so I thought. The next ten years were a rollercoaster of medications, treatments, alternative therapy and surgeries(15 to be exact.)

I was miserable. My family was miserable. But, I’d had enough and didn’t want any more treatments. Soon I was back in the hospital and one doctor reviewed ALL my info and said he knew exactly how to fix me…OK, just one more surgery then. Well, he was right…he fixed me!! I was no longer having incontinence issues, I could eat again (personalized diet plan) and was feeling great compared to the previous ten years. End of story right?!

WRONG! Less than a year after surgery I was in an accident where I was crushed between our off-road truck and the back wall of our garage. It was a literal and figurative blow that nearly took my life. I had holes in my large intestine, holes in my small intestine, a shattered pelvis, four broken bones in my back and an aortic aneurysm. I had to undergo countless operations, hours of physical therapy and I was even put into a coma while doctors worked fixing one piece at a time.

After everything began to heal I realized how broken I was. After the accident, I lost myself. I had worked as a medical assistant for years and loved working in healthcare. Now that was gone. I was finally a mother after trying for nearly ten years. Now I couldn’t even lift my two-year-old son for a hug. I took great pride in being a partner to my husband. Now I needed him to help me sit on the toilet. I was stressed and depressed. My UC symptoms worsened by the day and now that I had shortened guts it caused a multitude of other problems like rectal prolapse (twice!) which led me to finally agree to get my colostomy pouch. I cried, a lot.

Being home, then in and out of the hospital, and no longer able to have a 9-5 job I decided to start a little online business selling skincare and cosmetics. Not really to make money but just to feel like I was doing SOMETHING! I had to get out of this funk. I was hiding. Hiding from my husband, even though he had an easier time accepting things than I did. Hiding from my reflection- because every time I saw myself I felt depressed and sad. I was hiding from the world by wearing bulky sweatshirts in the middle of summer so no one would see my bag. Then one day in my online makeup group I shared a bit of my story. The response was amazing and beautiful and that’s when things began to shift. One afternoon I received a message from an old friend suggesting I compete in a Mrs. Beauty pageant since the focus is so much on what you do to inspire rather than just what you look like. Me? In a pageant? Probably not. Then a few weeks later the same suggestion from another. Ok universe…I hear you. I decided to apply for the Mrs. Washington America pageant and was quickly named Mrs. Mason County.

Great! What in the heck did I sign up for? Before surgery, I swore off swimsuits and anything tightly fitted. Now, not only will I wear a swimsuit on stage but I’m going to ask to be JUDGED?!?! What on earth was I thinking? Now, in addition to volunteering and fundraising, each queen must have a platform. Something they want to bring awareness to and are passionate about. The obvious choice for me was gastrointestinal disease and ostomy awareness and education, but that’s not the most beautiful platform and can make people uncomfortable. As quickly as the idea came, fear and doubt began to creep in and I promptly began thinking of other ideas.

At my first pageant event, a holiday party to meet all the other queens, we were introduced to a designer that would be custom designing an opening number dress for each of us! As I chatted with the designer I quietly mentioned I had a colostomy bag and could we design something to hide it as much as possible because I wanted to feel beautiful. A short while later I bumped into a sister queen at the elevators. She introduced herself and wanted to know if she could ask a personal question…of course, I said! She asked if she overheard my conversation correctly that I had a colostomy bag? Yes, yes I do! “Really?!? Where, I don’t see it?” She continued, “are you happy you made that choice? What’s the hardest part? Does it hurt?” A million questions rolled off her tongue at once and then she shared her struggles with GI disease and the fact that an ostomy has come up in her doctor’s appointments and she was terrified and thought life would be over¬– until she met me! I knew right then, I had the right platform and that by sharing my story I could help others in ways I never dreamed.

At that moment a woman approached. She wanted to let me know her husband has an ostomy and seeing me on stage gave them so much hope and even though I didn’t win they were cheering for me! Again, I had to thank the universe for letting me know I was exactly where I was supposed to be.

In the months leading up to the pageant, I began volunteering at hospitals and schools, sharing about differences and acceptance. I had the opportunity to be a speaker with a major medical company to share my ostomy journey and provide input to how they can better serve our community. I even went live on Facebook and showed my bag to the world!

In a few short months, I became empowered and proud of my body and my spirit again. I walked the stage in a swimsuit like I was a supermodel, rocked a gorgeous FITTED gown with grace, and with a smile heard myself say the word bowels, as it proudly rang through the pageant auditorium.

Guess what? I didn’t win. I did not even place in the top 10. I went to the coronation party with a stage smile and promptly excused myself with my best friend by my side. She knew I needed to cry. As we reached the bottom of the grand staircase I could feel the tears of disappointment welling, and her hand grasping tighter to my arm letting me know I just had to keep it together for a few more seconds. At that moment a woman approached. She wanted to let me know her husband has an ostomy and seeing me on stage gave them so much hope and even though I didn’t win they were cheering for me! Again, I had to thank the universe for letting me know I was exactly where I was supposed to be.

Soon after, I applied to represent Washington at the Ms. World International pageant after a few weeks and committee meetings later, I was selected! I am now Mrs. Washington World America and I couldn’t be more proud to represent my state and the ostomy community at the upcoming pageant.

I never thought I’d have an ostomy. I never dreamed this farm girl would be a beauty queen. I never imagined my trials would become my triumph and my story of hope. Throughout my life, many have attempted comfort me with the words “everything happens for a reason.” This honestly just kept me waiting for a moment of clarity and answers but that moment never came. I found no reason! I think sometimes bad things just happen and it’s up to us to give them meaning and purpose. For me this is it. Sharing my story, my triumphs, my tragedies. All in the hope that it can be a light for someone stumbling in the darkness.

 

Robin Brown will be this year’s Ostomy Awareness Day Champion for UOAA. Check out all the ways to get involved and join with her on Saturday, October 3, 2020.  

A patient who did not know what to expect walks you through the process (with photos)

By AnneMarie Finn

According to UOAA information on this website, a urostomy is “a surgically created opening in the abdominal wall through which urine passes. A urostomy may be performed when the bladder is either not functioning or has to be removed. There are several different types of surgeries, but the most common are ileal conduit and colonic conduit. Reasons for surgery include bladder cancer, spinal cord injuries, malfunction such as chronic infection of the bladder and birth defects such as spina bifida.” Great definition, but what does it mean? When I was told I would need a radical cystectomy, leading to an ileal conduit I had no clue. The following is my experience.

Because of bladder cancer, my bladder needed to be removed and a new way to pass urine created. Due to the location of the tumor, my urethra was also removed so my surgeon and I settled on an ileal conduit, a conventional urostomy. It is called ileal conduit because a piece of the ileum, or small bowel, is used to make a passage for urine to go from the kidneys and ureters out of the body. The other end is brought out through a hole in the abdomen where urine exits through a stoma (more on that shortly). It is known as an incontinent urinary diversion because you cannot control the urine. As a result, a collection bag or pouch hangs from your abdomen to catch the urine. The pouch is not visible as it is worn under your clothes. Still not clear? It wasn’t for me either.

A couple of days before surgery, I met with an ostomy nurse at the hospital where I would be receiving my surgery. She marked where the stoma would be placed. She saw how I wore my pants. She had me sit, stand, lay down, and bend over, She drew a mark with a marker about 2.5 inches to the right and 3 inches down from my navel and covered it with a waterproof dressing. This would guide the surgeon as to the optimal spot to place the stoma. The surgeon had the ultimate call on where the stoma went, depending on the surgery itself. I also met with a nurse for a pre-op appointment. They went through the typical exam and then explained the ERAS protocol to me. ERAS, Enhanced Recovery After Surgery, is used at my hospital for radical cystectomies. They no longer use a bowel prep. You drink a high carbohydrate drink in the hours prior to your surgery. They get you up walking and feed you by the day after surgery. The goal is to keep your bowels working. This reduces the length of hospital stay and the number of complications.

This is major surgery. It is considered one of the most complex cancer surgeries performed. My surgery took 7 hours. They removed the bladder, urethra, uterus, cervix, fallopian tubes, an ovary, and some lymph nodes. When I woke up, I had a bag, a large incision with more than 30 staples and a Jackson Pratt (JP) drain on my abdomen. I also had intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) devices on my legs, my spa legs. Blood clots are a common side effect of a radical cystectomy. Because of that, I also received daily prophylaxis blood thinner shots in my belly for 30 days. I was not in a great deal of pain which was easily managed with Tylenol. I was definitely weak, but otherwise ok. I went home in 4 days, on my own with my urostomy.

The stoma is the badge of the urostomy. My stoma is about one inch in diameter. It is pretty round, It sticks out. It sometimes moves in and out. You can’t feel it. It has been described as looking like a rosebud. It is red. This is where the urine exits the body. You have no control over it. Sometimes it will also expel mucus. Some people name them. I did.
Rudolph, my red, round stoma

You use a urine collection pouch, or bag, to catch the urine. The hospital will send you home with some so you do not need to have them on hand before you get home. There are many different brands. In fact, until I found what worked best for me, I tried most of them. My pouch is about 8 inches long, 6-7 inches wide and has a 1-2 inch closable spout on the bottom. It also is a deep convex bag as my stoma does not stick out very far and it helps protect my skin. I prefer the clear bag so I can see the stoma and center it when I put it on. There are both one and two-piece bags. I have used both. One-piece pouches have the bag and a skin barrier attached. The skin barrier has adhesive, also called a flange or wafer, that sticks to your skin. There is a hole that goes over the stoma. Some are pre-cut, some are not. If not, you must cut a hole slightly bigger than your stoma before putting it on. There are also two-piece systems. The bags are separate from the skin barrier. They are attached by a Tupperware-like seal. You can leave the skin barrier on and take off the pouch.

Front and back of 1 piece, deep convex pouch

I change my pouch every 3 days. I like to remove the old pouch and take a shower with it off. I feel so free. To remove, I use an adhesive removal spray and wipes to clean the skin. I shower and wash the area around the stoma with soap and dandruff shampoo, which contains Zinc. Some people wash with a vinegar and water combo. If I change without showering, I just use plain water to rinse. After showering, I use a hairdryer on the lowest setting to dry the skin around the stoma so the wafer sticks to it. Drying your skin is important. I have some skin issues so I also use a skin barrier protective sheet, that I cut a hole to match the opening of the wafer, and a cohesive seal.

Protective Sheet with hole cut out and Cohesive Seal

Some people use powders, paste, barrier wipes, etc. I do not. It took a lot of trial and error to find what worked best for me. You need to find what works for you. One of the best ways to do this is to work with an ostomy nurse. They can help you navigate ordering and finding the best system for you.
At night, I use the urinary drainage bag they sent me home with from the hospital. For me, it works the best. There are several brands of night bags and even jugs. I put it on the floor next to my bed inside of a small wastebasket. This has been key as the drain has opened (or been left open) and the wastebasket collected the urine, preventing a rug catastrophe. I am a very active sleeper and I am not really hindered too much from my bag. I am able to sleep on my back, sides, and stomach. Don’t be afraid to sleep. People add their own tubing and tube placement strategies. Use whatever works for you. I also highly recommend a waterproof mattress pad. Mattresses are expensive. I also use the night drainage bag on long car trips. I don’t have to stop and use those disgusting public toilets. I even used it during the Avengers finale. I was probably the only person in the theater who did not have to get up to use the facilities during the movie! People were actually jealous.

Night Drainage Pouch

I honestly can’t even feel my pouch. I empty it every 1-2 hours, depending on how much I drink. Sometimes there is a “ghost” feeling where my bladder used to be making it feel like I have to pee. Ah, the good old days. It is actually a weird sensation drinking a lot and not feeling like I have to go. The bag is not noticeable under my clothes. I really do wear what I wore before surgery: jeans, sheath dresses, shorts, and bathing suits. I am still sexually active. Having gone through this experience with my wonderful caregiver, my husband, has brought us closer. Most importantly, I am cancer-free.

Bladder cancer and urostomy surgery do not stop Annemarie from living her best life.

I am a bag lady. I am highly educated and employed, yet carry a bag wherever I go. I don’t leave home without it. Because of bladder cancer, I have a urostomy. Like many other women, it took some time for my diagnosis. At 57, many of the symptoms I experienced were attributed to my age: menopause, UTIs, kidney stones, fibroids, etc. Thanks to the fibroids, I was scheduled for an ultrasound. It was my gynecologist who found the bladder tumor. She referred me to a urologist. In fact, she insisted. Her office called to make sure I followed through. I met that week with a local urologist. He did a scope. I saw him look at the nurse, concern written on both their faces. He started talking about surgery and apologizing for the diagnosis. In my naivete’, I had gone to the appointment by myself. I don’t remember him even saying the words, but I had bladder cancer.

Scans and a transurethral resection of a bladder tumor (TURBT) were scheduled for the following week. Usually an outpatient procedure, I was in the hospital for 4 days due to heavy bleeding after the TURBT. The tumor was large and the doctor couldn’t get it all but he thought it had penetrated the muscle. Unfortunately, the pathology was inconclusive so he did another TURBT the following week. The outcomes were exactly the same so we both decided my best chances were for a second opinion at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. Throughout our discussions, he explained what my future might entail. It looked likely that they were going to have to remove the bladder and I would either have a new “bladder” or a bag. Quite honestly, I had no idea what it entailed, but I was horrified.

Dana-Farber is an amazing place. I had a whole team in place: a medical oncologist, an oncology urologist, a nephrologist, among others. The plan was an MRI to confirm the tumor’s pathology, a nephrostomy tube, chemotherapy and, if the cancer had not spread, a radical cystectomy. If it had spread, I would not need surgery but would be eligible for palliative care. Who would have thought surgery is the best case scenario. Due to claustrophobia, and despite anesthesia and Ativan, I moved so the MRI was inconclusive. I needed another TURBT. Thanks to my new amazing surgeon, the tumor was removed and the passage to my kidney was cleared. The pathology of the tumor showed no spread to the muscle and an ultrasound showed no more kidney hydronephrosis. Even better, I would no longer require chemotherapy. I did try immunotherapy with BCG but it did not work. The cancer was aggressive so we had to treat it aggressively. My radical cystectomy was scheduled for January 25, 2019.

It took me a long time to get there. I even asked what would happen if I did not receive the surgery. I would be dead in a year.

Wow, that was sobering. Because of the proximity of the tumor, I did not qualify for a neobladder. I would have to have a urostomy. Every time I talked about it, or even thought about it, I cried. I felt like I was going to be a freak. I offered my husband a divorce if he wanted one. I was devastated and frightened. I have learned that fear of the unknown and our imaginations are far worse than the reality. While so much of what had happened to me was out of my control, I did have control over one thing: HOW I handled everything. I decided knowledge was power. I was fortunate. My hospital had a class for urostomy candidates. For the first time, I was able to see an actual urostomy pouch. I was given hands-on instruction on how to change a bag. I met ostomy nurses (the best people in the world!) who would be helping me.

I decided I would be the one to handle my changes, right from the start. I would take control.

My surgery lasted 7 hours. I needed a transfusion but things went well otherwise. The surgery was not easy. People have described it as feeling like you were hit by a bus. I never really had any pain. It was easily managed with Tylenol. However, I was so weak. I eventually needed an iron transfusion. The one thing I wish I had gotten for my return home was a shower chair. Showers were the worst for me. It took me two months to feel more like myself and another month before I felt ready to return to work. I also cannot say enough about getting a good ostomy nurse. I have been described as a delicate flower (surprising to those who know me). I have very sensitive skin. The nurse was a Godsend to me in trying to manage all of my skin issues. After my visiting nurse visits ended, I continued to see the ostomy nurses at the hospital where I had my surgery. It took a year but, through trial and error, I finally have gotten a handle on things.

I had a few leaks. They were usually caused by user error. They were not the huge floods I expected. Honestly, none of this was as awful as I expected. So many people said this would be my “new normal”. I can’t stand that term. I call it my new reality. There isn’t anything normal about having a urostomy. However, it is very doable. I now wear two-piece bathing suits. I didn’t before. I am wearing the same clothes as I did before. I can kayak, hike, ride my bike, swim for hours, anything I did before. I was here for the birth of my first grandchild. I am back to work, a job that I love. I am not shy about talking about my bag to others. It is not a secret. In fact, I am kind of proud of it. I am alive and life is good.

Imagine being your 15-year-old self again. What did that feel like? Young, carefree, happy…healthy?
For me, I felt all of those things every day. I played the clarinet, got good grades, was athletic from running track, active in school/church clubs and had amazing family/friends. What more could I want as a teenager?

I didn’t want for anything until one day I no longer felt like my healthy self anymore and all I wanted was to be healthy again. This is when my life changed forever…

It was November of 2012, at the time I had just moved to Los Angeles, California with my mother from Maryland. I was very excited to move and support my mom with her new job opportunity. She is like my best friend and nurturer at the same time. It was always just her and I growing up, no siblings. California’s scenery was colorful and vibrant. All I could picture were the great things my future would bring living there.

That picture flipped upside down within weeks. I could feel my stomach expressing to me that it didn’t like the chicken nuggets or the pepperoni pizza, I was feeding it. Sharp pains that felt like knives were sticking me each time I would eat, pushed me to never want to pick up another piece of food again. No over-the-counter medicine could relieve the amount of pain I would feel. Sick little me sat helplessly with my mother by my side in Ronald Regan UCLA Medical Center’s emergency room waiting to be admitted and seen by a doctor. I thought to myself, “What was happening to me? I don’t understand.”

I couldn’t understand. I was just fine a month ago. My mom was just as confused as I was. The doctors weren’t transparent enough with my diagnosis and had trouble figuring out what was the actual problem. After a few tests, I was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis/Crohn’s disease. This diagnosis soon changed once the gastrointestinal team at UCLA Medical Center (UCLAMC) realized it was strictly my colon that was being affected which changed my diagnosis to ulcerative colitis.

I had no idea what ulcerative colitis was nor had I ever heard of it before. My current gastroenterologist, Dr. Ziring, asked who in my family had the disease but I wasn’t familiar with anyone. My father, mother, and grandparents didn’t have any trace of ulcerative colitis. It was concluded that the change in climate and stress could have taken a toll on my body to make me flare-up. I couldn’t eat certain foods anymore. I was prescribed all types of medication that I had never seen and forced to take pills that were pretty huge to swallow.

Lacee Harper with her mother.

Nearly one month spent in the hospital, my routine had changed. I would wake up take my meds first, eat (liquid-solid foods), watch TV, read a book, walk around to gain my strength and repeat at least three times a day. Once I was released, I remember being so happy to be a normal person again. That feeling went away when my mom took me to buy nutritional drinks to restore my protein, vitamins, and minerals. I couldn’t fit into any of my clothes from the amount of weight I lost and my toned body went away. Dr. Ziring told me that I would live with this forever because there is no cure, which I didn’t want to believe. All I could do was try to understand and educate why my body reacted the way it did to certain foods, activities and mental stability.

Fast forward to 2013 where I moved back to Maryland with my mother, I was enrolled back in my previous high school and actively seeing, pediatric gastroenterologist, Dr. Oliva-Hemker at John Hopkin’s hospital. I couldn’t do any of the previous extracurricular activities I participated in and could only workout at a minimal intensity due to my low blood counts. Throughout the school year, I experienced many flare-ups and trial/error with different medications. Some hospitalizations were longer than others and overtime I became stricter with my diet to prevent excessive flare-ups. My high school graduation wasn’t the best time for me because I was experiencing a severe flare-up that interfered with my ability to keep food down. I missed my senior week summer trip to recover in the hospital and get back to feeling better again.

After graduating from high school, I switched gastroenterologists since I was considered an adult. Dr. Rosen had been my mom’s gastroenterologist for years so the transition was smooth. I was stabilized on Humira and Prednisone throughout my community college career. By then, my mother and I had moved to Atlanta where the weather was nicer. I think the weather, being around family/friends and less stress I experienced helped my flare-ups calm down living in Atlanta. I truly enjoyed my time there and experiencing college at Georgia State University, as well as working part-time.

Lacee recently graduated with a master’s degree from the S.I. Newhouse School of Communications at Syracuse University.

Once I completed my first two years of college and received my associate’s degree, I transferred to Syracuse University (SU) to achieve my bachelor’s degree. This was one of the hardest transitions of my life moving from the South to the cold North. My third year of college and first-year being away at a university led to my body experiencing an extreme transition which resulted in three severe flare-ups. My mother left Atlanta and moved back to Maryland to be closer to me because she was terrified of how sick I was getting. Each time I flared up, I flew home to get the treatment from Dr. Rosen. Suddenly, Humira no longer worked for my body anymore and Prednisone wasn’t healthy for me to keep using to reduce inflammation due to its side effects.

During senior year, my 3-week hospitalization interfered with my academics and involvement in extracurricular activities. At this time, I was advised to try Entyvio and I was tired of trying new medications. The only way I could have some quality of life was to remove my colon. My mom was concerned for me, but I couldn’t let her concerns steer my thinking I knew I had to do this for me if I wanted to make it to graduation.

In November of 2017, I set an appointment with Dr. Colvin in Northern Virginia to discuss my surgery. I had the surgery during my college winter break, spent Christmas in the hospital, recovered and returned back to school. At the time, I didn’t know how I was going to apply to graduate school at the S.I. Newhouse School of Communications at SU but I did that during my recovery period. It took a lot of exercise, mental motivation, empathy and support from family, my best friends, mentors and peers at school. With amazing grace and good spirits, I got accepted into the public relations program at the S.I. Newhouse School of Communications.

From this specific point on, learning how to function in everyday life with my ostomy took a lot of patience, time, emotional breakdowns, motivation and positive mental strength. I don’t regret any of it at all. I do not have to worry about missing out or not fully enjoying any more important events of my life. Now as of 2020, I have been medication-free for two full years, graduated school with all of my degrees, feel healthier than ever, working full-time in public relations and am actively pursuing my dreams in the entertainment (modeling/tv/film) industry.

It wasn’t until a couple of months ago, I discovered United Ostomy Association of America (UOAA) and chose to reach out to Advocacy Manager Jeanine Gleba about getting more involved. Since reaching out, I have gained the opportunity to advocate for patient’s access to treatment during the Digestive Disease National Coalition Day on the Hill and spoke on the behalf of UOAA. I am elated to have met UOAA’s team and to represent others like myself who have experienced challenging obstacles.

I couldn’t be more grateful for my ostomy and must say that it changed my life for the good. Life is full of obstacles but how you choose to overcome them will make your life. I chose to take full control of my life in order to have a better quality of life. It doesn’t matter who you are, you can truly do whatever you put your mind to. Believing in yourself and staying grounded in positivity, motivation and dedication is key. Follow your dreams, find what makes you happy and don’t let the negatives take control of your life.

The ostomy community is understandably very concerned about how the COVID-19 outbreak is affecting their daily lives, health, support networks, and access to ostomy supplies.

In this time of great uncertainty, UOAA recommends all individuals consult with their own primary care physicians with questions concerning their risk factor or if they exhibit any symptoms. Please follow the Center for Disease Control (CDC) website for actual up to date information. We recognize that many people living with an ostomy or continent diversion are older people and those with chronic disease and are therefore at higher risk of developing serious illness. Please also see CDC guidelines for people at risk

UOAA is also hearing from many Affiliated Support Groups who have prudently decided to cancel their upcoming meetings. Members should expect that their meetings will be canceled for the foreseeable future. Affiliated Support Groups are each independently run and members should contact their local leaders if they have any questions about their meetings. Community guidelines are also available from the CDC to assist leaders in deciding steps they should take to address public health concerns.  

UOAA reached out to the major ostomy manufacturers to see if the outbreak is currently impacting their production or supply chain. As of March 4, 2020 none of the manufacturers reported any issues in their operations as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak. Read our previous blog post for statements from individual manufacturers on this topic. Check with your distributor to see if there are any shipping delays due to increased demand of all goods at this time. 

If you develop a fever, cough and have difficulty breathing always contact your healthcare provider. They will determine if you are a candidate for a COVID-19 test. Medicare and private insurance should cover a test to see if you have coronavirus if requested from a physician. Additionally, Medicare is offering telemedicine options so people can stay home as much as possible during this crisis. Contact your private insurer to discover any additional benefits they may be offering at this time. For frequently asked questions and facts about this virus follow updates from the CDC on the latest COVID-19 guidelines.

UOAA will update this blog post with any information that may affect our community. 

Updated: 4/10/20

The coronavirus is spreading around the world and some in the ostomy community are concerned if it will affect their access to ostomy supplies. UOAA reached out to the major ostomy manufacturers to see if the outbreak is currently impacting their production or supply chain. As of April 3, 2020 none of the manufacturers are currently reporting any issues in their operations as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.

As with any natural disaster personal preparation is key and there are many steps you can take now to be prepared for any unexpected impact in your life or community. For those who become ill or have a compromised immune system, always contact your physician with any concerns. If you are on Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) and become ill it covers a test to see if you have Coronavirus. For frequently asked questions and facts about this virus follow updates from the CDC on the latest COVID-19 guidelines.

These are the latest statements and information from leading ostomy product companies, they will be updated as needed.

11 Health

At 11 Health we understand that the challenges of COVID-19 extend beyond the needs of patients who are suffering from the virus. Our ostomy patients tell us that hospitals are cancelling their appointments and people are struggling to access their doctors and nurses; a big issue for people suffering from a chronic illness. That’s why we have launched our free 12 week remote patient monitoring Alfred SmartCare program to support ostomates using our patient coaches, tele-health nurses and dedicated app to provide a pro-active and preventative wellness program. We encourage you to visit us @ www.11health.com

With regard to access to supplies, we continue to safely manufacture and distribute. We currently have stocks in house of all Alfred SmartCare products and moving forward we do not anticipate any issues with smartbag supply.

 Hollister Incorporated Statement on the 2019 Novel Coronavirus

In response to the global health emergency concerning the spread of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19), Hollister Incorporated has taken steps to protect our Associates, and seeks to ensure that our customers experience no disruption to the supply of their products. Hollister is diligently cooperating with our suppliers across the globe to identify any potential impacts the coronavirus (COVID-19) may have on our suppliers as well as our own operations.
At this time, based on the information received to date, we do not anticipate an impact to our ability to supply or to our other business operations.
Hollister Incorporated continues to monitor this public health threat and considers the guidance provided by the World Health Organization, the US and European Centers for Disease Control and other sources in managing our overall ongoing response to this public health emergency.
We reassure you that we are taking appropriate measures to help ensure our customers, our Associates and our operations are cared for during this critical time. We continue to monitor the situation closely.
For additional inquiries, please contact corporate.communications@hollister.com.

3/24/20 Secure Start Services A Message from the Hollister Incorporated Family – COVID-19

Coloplast Statement

4/3/20

We hope you are doing well. We realize at this time, many of you may be dealing with lots of changes in your personal or family lives related to the COVID-19 outbreak. How can Coloplast® Care help you in this time of uncertainty? We aim to be the connection that builds your confidence in living with your intimate healthcare condition.
At this time, more than ever, assistance from Coloplast® Care may be more crucial as people stay home. The Coloplast Care team is still here for you, and we have extended our hours to six days a week to better support you.
Our Care Advisors are available by phone from 7 am to 7 pm Central Time, Monday – Friday and additionally 9 am to 1 pm Central Time on Saturdays
Here’s how to reach the Ostomy team

Call: 1-877-858-2656
E-mail: Care-us@Coloplast.com

We are here to support you with wellness information, product access information, and ostomy product samples. We also have some great educational resources for you available online, 24 x 7.

We have a number of educational resources available for you at our website, and encourage you to visit our resources: www.ostomy.coloplastcare.us

Concerns about access to supplies

We continue to safely manufacture and distribute our products. Currently, the COVID-19 outbreak is not impacting our ability to supply our ostomy and continence products, so we encourage you to continue to order your supplies as you regularly would.

At a time when many are concerned about receiving their medical supplies, Care Advisors can help coordinate product access by helping match you with product dealers who meet your insurance needs. If you are having trouble reaching your dealer or getting your medical supplies, please call us and we will ensure that you can continue to receive the products you need.

To read more about the initiatives that we have put in place globally and for updates related to the coronavirus, please visit our website. Let Coloplast Care be your reliable source of information for your intimate healthcare needs.

Kind regards,
Your Coloplast® team

ConvaTec Statement

At ConvaTec, we understand that the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) situation is impacting everyone. We’re doing our part to be socially responsible while still ensuring that our customers can contact us and receive the support they need.

To keep employees and customers safe, we’ve adjusted our work arrangements, including work from home where possible, to maintain social distancing.  As always, our me+ team of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Certified Nurses and product specialists are available, by phone or email, to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact our ConvaTec me+™ Support Team at 1-800-422-8811 (M-F, 8:30AM – 7:00 PM Eastern Time) or email cic@convatec.com.

ConvaTec Ostomy Care Global Impact
Our Ostomy products, whether produced by ConvaTec or in partnership with outsourced partners, are not manufactured in countries with high levels of reported cases of Coronavirus, this includes China. The situation is changing daily and therefore, ConvaTec has a dedicated team tasked with continually reviewing the situation, maintaining close collaboration with our suppliers and logistics partners, and communicating changes as the situation evolves.

Nu-Hope Statement

It is our recommendation that ostomates keep at least 1 box of spare pouches at all times. (This recommendation is independent of the COVID-19 outbreak). We do not recommend stockpiling supplies as this will stress the supply chain and likely cause delays and disruptions to your regular orders. Nu-Hope offers ½ boxes for sale through certain dealers.

Safe n Simple Statement

Safe n Simple would like to assure all of the ostomy community that we are well stocked on supplies and do not foresee any issues or concerns with being able to provide products needed during the Coronavirus outbreak.

Expect More – Take Control of Your Health Care

Part 3 in Series

By Jeanine Gleba and Keagan Lynggard-Hysell

The Choice is Yours

Having the right ostomy supplies for your individual lifestyle and stoma type plays a huge role in the quality of your life. As a new ostomate I fell victim to the common misconceptions that daily leakage and skin irritation were normal occurrences that came with the territory of having an ostomy, when in reality I was going through unnecessary struggles due to the fact that I wasn’t using the best products for my individual situation.

For those unfamiliar with my story, shortly after my diagnosis of Crohn’s disease in 2005, I was rushed to the Emergency Department with a bowel perforation and underwent my first ostomy surgery. After the operation, I endured many complications due to several different infections and the severity of my disease. I was hospitalized for a consecutive 8 months and would face 5 more surgeries within that first year of my diagnosis, all resulting in either a colostomy or ileostomy. Being in the hospital for essentially the first year of having a stoma, I was limited to the ostomy supplies provided by the hospital. Once I made the transition home and was receiving home health care I continued using the same supplies I had been using in the hospital simply because it was all I had ever known.

For the first few years of living with my ostomy I was isolated by the insecurities fueled by daily pouch leaks, chronic skin irritation, and the fear of experiencing a leak or unexpected odor in public. It wasn’t until I got to the point where my peristomal skin was so excoriated and I could no longer keep a pouch on for longer than a few hours that I finally made an appointment to see a WOC nurse.

During my appointment, not only were my skin issues addressed, but my WOC nurse introduced me to a new ostomy appliance and accessories that would work best for my individual stoma and lifestyle. I was given a product catalog which my WOC nurse had marked with tabs on the new products we used that day so I could order them for the upcoming month as well as any samples of other supplies I was interested in trying in the future. That day, I left my appointment feeling comfortable and confident in my new ostomy appliance.

As time went on, I no longer experienced the daily leakage or skin irritation that I had with my previous appliance, and this drastically improved my quality of life. I was no longer worried about odor, or ruining my clothes, I felt more confident in public and was able to participate in the activities I had once restricted myself from doing out of fear that my ostomy appliance would not stay on properly.

As ostomates, we are fortunate that manufacturers continue to improve our ostomy supplies. For the last 13 years that I have been living with my ostomy I have benefited greatly from product innovation and feel confident in the ostomy appliance I wear today.

As an ostomy patient advocate, I am often invited to share my story with nursing students, WOC nurses, as well as other health care professionals. By providing the patient perspective, I encourage them to educate their patients on the supply options available and that a patient’s ostomy appliance plays a huge role in their everyday life.

It’s important to remember that our stomas may change, our bodies may change, and more often than not- our ostomy supplies may change- and that is okay! The most important thing to remember is to seek out the most optimal pouching appliance for you so that you may live the life you love and want to live.  The most important thing to remember is, whatever works best for you and your individual stoma.

Know that you have Ostomy Product Choices

As listed in the UOAA Patient Bill of Rights, ideally before patients are discharged from the hospital they should be informed of the pouching  system that has been prescribed to them as well as have an understanding of the ostomy supply ordering process.   In addition to the pouching system prescribed, patients should be provided with information on the supply choices available to them once they are home.

When in the hospital, your ostomy supplies are included as a part of your treatment of service. To keep costs down, the hospital only has a small selection of ostomy products from a particular manufacturer vendor that they contract with.  As a result patients are initially limited to whatever ostomy supplies the hospital uses. Know that you are not locked into any pouching system and that you have many choices to find the ideal system for your stoma and lifestyle.  (It should be noted that many patients stay with their initial hospital brand and are very satisfied with these supplies.)

Before you leave the hospital be sure to get the product codes for the specific ostomy supplies used while in the hospital. Request that extra ostomy supplies be sent home with you upon discharge to ensure you have enough on-hand until your first order arrives at home, or until your first home nurse visit if you will be receiving home health care. Don’t forget to ask about being enrolled in one of the discharge programs that are sponsored by ostomy manufacturers.

It is completely normal for your stoma size to change in the weeks following surgery, so what was initially prescribed in the hospital might need to be altered.

As always it is strongly encouraged that you work with an ostomy nurse to find the best products to meet your needs and particular situation. Manufacturers’ also have WOC nurses available to discuss any issues or answer your questions if you do not have a WOC nurse/OMS available in your area. Their services are free of charge and they are dedicated to helping you.

When you are ready, feel free to experiment with different manufacturers  or different types of products. It may be helpful to order a product catalog from your medical supplier, so you can see the different products available and what assortment you have to choose from. Also, either you or a family member can call the manufacturer’s toll free 800 number and request product samples, or ask your supplier for a sample.

Know Your Pouching System

In the ostomy world, it is wonderful to know that there are many different styles and types of pouching systems available, and that manufacturers are continually improving their styles and selections.  Manufacturers listen to ostomy nurses and to patients as they seek to improve the lives of ostomates.

It is good to understand the basics of pouching systems and then advance your knowledge as you become familiar with your own system. Once you gain confidence in the terminology, you can begin to explore options for yourself.  Please use this link to learn about the different types of options available. Another excellent resource is here.

Know Supplier Options

The major manufacturers do not sell supplies directly to ostomates. Furthermore, ostomy supplies are rarely available for purchase in chainstore pharmacies such as CVS or Walgreens. Before you begin ordering ostomy supplies, itis important to do your research (read online reviews too) and carefully consider your options when choosing your supplier (Under Medicare these are known as Durable Medical Equipment providers.). Some things to consider when choosing your supplier: affordability (reasonably priced), reliability (on-time delivery) and reputation (quality service).  You should also know the answers to these questions before deciding on your supplier:

  • Do you want to shop at and support a small local medical/surgical supply house or order from the convenience of home through a large mail-order house (aka national online vendor)? There are pros and cons to each but typically national vendors carry a wider range of products, many (but not all) accept Medicare assignment and due to higher volumes can offer lower pricing.
  • Do they accept your health insurance?
  • What are the prices before and after your deductible is met?
  • Do you have to submit the claim for reimbursement to your insurer or do they directly bill the insurance company for you?
  • Do they carry all of the products that you need for your unique pouching application system?
  • Do they stock and keep current with the latest available in ostomy technology and do they suggest new products?
  • If you are on Medicare, do they “accept assignment”?
  • What is the return policy or how do they handle product issues such as defects or incompatibility?
  • Do they only ship in quantities for 30 days (1 month) or also offer 90 day (3 month)?
  • Do they charge shipping?
  • Do they impose their own quantity limits on supplies?
  • How long does it take to receive orders?
  • Do they help rectify insurance denials and work on appeals?
  • Do they work with your doctor to renew your prescription or if you need a change to your supply order?
  • Do they have personalized customer service with helpful reps knowledgeable about ostomy supplies?
  • Do they offer free ostomy nurse consultations to give you tips and guidance?

Tip: Be sure to have a back-up supplier in case your normal provider has a disruption in service or is waiting for your type of supplies on back-order.

Know what Information is Needed to Order Supplies

It’s helpful before you place an order to have all of the information about your pouching application system ready. The most important thing to know when placing an order is the order number for your particular supplies and accessories. The order number will tell the supplier what kind of pouch and accessories that you use. If you are ordering for the first time or switching suppliers,  be sure to know the type of ostomy appliance and any other accessories that you use. Include the pouching system product, size, and product number. Download the UOAA Know Your Pouching System (Appliance) Checklist tool to have handy.

 

Conclusion

Knowing your current ostomy appliance and accessories, where and how to purchase them, that options are available in product selection, and that you have a choice in all of these decisions helps to make you in control of your ostomy health care.  In addition, utilizing the resources available to you through your ostomy manufacturers, suppliers, and ostomy nurses will help provide the best experience with your supplies.

It is important that you are able to advocate for the right ostomy supplies that work best for you and your individual stoma so that you can feel confident and live well with your ostomy.

Please note: UOAA does not endorse particular products, manufacturers, or suppliers, and is not responsible for any content expressed in sponsor websites.