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About 4 years ago, I awoke to the alarm on my cell phone, and for some reason it seemed to be extra loud this time. I had probably only slept for about 2 hours, but still, I anxiously jumped out of bed with a nervous sense of excitement. Today was the day that would forever change the path of my life. Today was the day that I was headed to the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix Arizona to have an extremely risky abdominal cancer surgery with no real guarantees that I would even survive it. I had no idea that today was the day that would begin the toughest fight of my life.

You see, at the age of 51, I was diagnosed with “Pseudomyxoma Peritonei secondary to Well-Differentiated Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Appendix”. Ultimately this means that years ago, a cluster of cancerous cells had formed in my appendix which caused it to eventually explode. Subsequent to this painful event, the cancerous cells spread themselves throughout my abdominal cavity attaching and growing on the exterior of several organs and producing a considerable amount of ascites fluid. My surgeon explained to me that my condition was extremely rare, and risky with maybe a 30% chance of survival. He agreed to perform the surgery, but looked me in the eyes and said only if I will agree to do my part and be willing to fight for my life!

After the twelve and a half hour long surgery, I woke up to my family hovering over me, and praying for strength and healing. As I became more aware of where I was, I began to notice the multiple tubes, cords and electronic devices attached to me. The doctors and nurses were constantly coming in to check on me, making adjustments to my I.V., monitoring my pain level, and recording my vital signs. A little later, I was paid a visit by my surgeon and he introduced me to someone referred to as my ostomy nurse. I didn’t even realize that I had this bag attached to my abdomen until she asked for my permission to inspect it. Prior to the surgery, I remember my surgeon explaining to me and my wife that an ostomy bag was a possibility, but this was the least of my concerns and I didn’t really comprehend what that actually meant. Along with a couple of other organs, my colon was completely removed and I now had to embrace life with an ileostomy.

Robert at the Arizona Run for Resilience Ostomy 5k, “the sense of family, acceptance and understanding at this event provided much needed encouragement.”

 

For the first year, I dealt with it as best as I could, but in the back of my mind I believed that soon, I would be able to have the reversal surgery and no longer have to deal with an ostomy. As I was approaching the one year anniversary of becoming an ostomate, on Facebook I came in contact with a beautiful soul by the name of Jearlean Taylor. You have probably heard of her, and know that she has been a double ostomate since early childhood. We chatted for a while, and after a detailed discussion, I was convinced that having an ostomy wasn’t so bad. A few days later, I sat down with my surgeon to discuss the possibility of the reversal surgery, and we concluded that in my case, I would actually enjoy a better quality of life by keeping my ileostomy, which now has been named Paco.

Now that the decision had been made to keep Paco, I began to research ostomies and discovered the United Ostomy Associations of America. Come to find out, they were having an ostomy conference in California the very next month, so I

Robert at UOAA’s National Conference where he discovered he was welcomed into the “ostomy family.”

booked it, and made my way to Cali. Not really knowing what to expect, I was pleasantly surprised and almost overwhelmed with gratitude as I was so warmly embraced into the ostomate family. I learned so much about ostomies, and the stories shared by other ostomates really inspired me and gave me the courage to now tell my story. Last year, I finally felt I was physically strong enough to participate by walking in the Run For Resilience Ostomy 5K in Mesa, Arizona. Again, the sense of family, acceptance and understanding at this event provided much-needed encouragement.

 

I am inspired to inspire others by publicly sharing my journey of conquering cancer and living with an ostomy. Through music, speaking and near the completion of my first book, I am telling it all so that others will realize that life experiences will ultimately make you, and not break you. I have come to the realization that my ileostomy has not only changed my way of life but has actually contributed to saving my life. I am forever grateful…

“It’s easy to say what you’re willing to die for, but there is freedom in knowing what you’re willing to live for”.

–Robert Harrion

Follow me on Facebook, Instagram, & YouTube

www.RobertHarrion.com

BookMe@RobertHarrion.com

Bring Ostomy Awareness to your Neighborhood with the Run for Resilience Ostomy 5k

October 6 and 13, 2018

 

  1. Change a Life. The theme of World Ostomy Day on October 6, 2018 is “Speaking Out Changes Lives”. Speak out to smash stigmas and never let someone choose death over an ostomy ever again.
  2. Support the Dream of a Someone with an Ostomy. Some run for the first time, others walk to discover a new life after surgery. Donate to support a Run for Resilience location in your state, the worldwide Virtual 5k, or a participant fundraiser. If you or your support group start a fundraiser you can win prizes such as an exclusive Run for Resilience t-shirt, visor or group party. (Proceeds benefit the programs of UOAA)
  3. Have Fun and Get in Shape. All events are family-friendly and some feature special happening like a picnic (Arizona), giveaways, kids runs and activities, silent auction, free beer (Idaho),

    Photo by: Natalie Koziuk Photography (www.nkoziukphotography.com)

    food or other perks. Check a location near you for local details. Feel better and crush your weekly step goal by starting to train today.

  4. You Can Do it Anywhere with a Virtual 5k. Challenge yourself and show the world what people living with an ostomy are capable of. Be a visible presence and walk/run anywhere you’d like in your community. Represent the resilience of all ostomates. Take photos of you and your friends doing the 5k and inspire others on social media.
  5. Win an exclusive designer ostomy pouch cover. Legendary Nashville fashion designer Manny Cuevas (a proud ostomate and race organizer) is hand making a pouch cover and it can be yours by registering as an ostomate and placing in the top 3 at each location or by gathering one of the biggest groups of family or friends to walk or run with you for the Virtual 5k.
  6. Get a free Ostomy Awareness Sticker. Register for the Virtual Ostomy 5k or pick one up at any of our 9 locations. You’ll also get a free race bib!
  7. Get a World Ostomy Day T-Shirt and Represent the USA. Register by Sept. 17th to be guaranteed your preferred race t-shirt size. Run athletic shirts are included with all event locations ($15 for the Virtual 5k). It’s the official event of #OstomyDayUSA, tag on social media to share your photos.colostomy bag, run for resilience, ostomy pouch, stoma bag, ostomy 5k, run for resilience
  8. Discover a New Ostomy Supply or Resource. Stop by sponsor and ostomy supply company display tables, or chat with a UOAArepresentative at events across the country.
  9. Get Outside and Run in Scenic Locales. The first week in October is a beautiful time of year and runs take place among some breathtaking beauty. A historic trail in Durham, lakeside in Michigan and Arizona, riverside parks in New Jersey, Nashville, Portland, Pennsylvania and Boise, along tree-lined streets in Birmingham, or your favorite spot with the Virtual 5k.
  10. You can Go at Your Own Pace or Cheer from the Sidelines. People of all ages and athletic backgrounds take part in the Ostomy 5k. An ostomate typically wins one of the runs while in others they are among the final finishers. It’s all about what resilience means to you.

Register or donate today at www.ostomy5k.org!

At Hollister Incorporated, we are proud to stand with the broader ostomy community to show how we are #AllinforOstomy.  People with ostomies, their families and friends worldwide are gearing up to celebrate World Ostomy Day on October 6, 2018—and you’re invited to join the excitement!

The Run for Resilience Ostomy 5K

Now in its fifth year, UOAA’s annual Run for Resilience Ostomy 5K has grown nationwide and our team at Hollister Incorporated will be right beside UOAA as the Diamond Sponsor of the event. A total of nine events are planned on Saturdays October 6 and 13 ranging from Durham, North Carolina, to Portland, Oregon. Much more than a walk/run, the Run for Resilience has become a family-friendly event that people look forward to all year. Many races feature a DJ, kids’ activities, a division for people with ostomies, and awards. Donations go directly to UOAA.  www.ostomy5k.org

Wear a Stoma Sticker – Share the Love

Stoma Stickers are a great way to educate, start a conversation, or show support for people living with or caring for ostomies. To show yours off, place the sticker over your clothes, on the lower right or left side between your hip and navel, where ostomies are typically located. Then, take a photo and share it on social media with the hashtags #AllinforOstomy and #WorldOstomyDay to help raise awareness and show your support!  Request your free sticker at www.stomasticker.com

Join a free educational webinar

We have developed a virtual conference that promotes skin health. Webinars will be available through the month of October starting on World Ostomy Day, and include the following.  Sign up for a webinar at hollister.com/worldostomyday

  • How to Use the Peristomal Skin Assessment Guide for Consumers
    psag-consumer.wocn.org
    A brief walk-through of how to use this important free resource from the WOCN society for teens and adults living with an ostomy. Led by Laurie McNichol, MSN, RN, CNS, GNP, CWOCN, CWON-AP, FAAN with Christine Kim, ileostomate since 1994 and founder of OstomyConnection.
  • Itching: The Invisible Peristomal Skin Concern
    A two-part series on causes and management.
  • It Begins with Skin: A Global Perspective
    A short film featuring clinicians and people living with stomas from around the world.

(Editor’s note: Hollister Incorporated is a Diamond Sponsor of this year’s Run for Resilience Ostomy 5k to celebrate World Ostomy Day. Their support helps make these UOAA ostomy awareness events possible)

 

Run for Resilience Ostomy 5k Expands its Reach

By Ed Pfueller, UOAA

The cause of ostomy awareness was visible on streets and trails all over the country for two Saturdays last October. People embracing life again after ostomy surgery, people still struggling with recent hospital stays, nurses, family, friends, returning participants, and local runners, were all represented. Supporters cheered as 616 people ran, walked or rolled in this year’s Run for Resilience Ostomy 5k. On Oct. 7th (Ostomy Awareness Day) and 14th, communities in Alabama, Arizona, Oregon, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Idaho, and Tennessee celebrated the resilience of people living with an ostomy or continent diversion by raising ostomy awareness. Another 139 runners nationwide opted to run/walk “virtually” in their own communities.

The Boise Run for Resilience Ostomy 5k is a family friendly event raising ostomy awareness. Photo by: Natalie Koziuk Photography (www.nkoziukphotography.com)

Passionate local organizers, over 50 volunteers, and local and national sponsors made this year’s events possible. UOAA provided logistical support and the proceeds the non-profit organization’s national education, advocacy and support programs.

Event locations expanded again last year adding venues in Mesa/Phoenix Arizona and Cookeville, Tennessee. Located about an hour east of Nashville the Tennessee event took place on the historic streets of the Downtown, Cookeville. Runners trotted under magnolia trees and along the historic main street of town before heading to the finish. Water was handed to them by representatives from Hollister, the Platinum sponsor for the year’s events who also hosted games of corn hole outside their sponsor tent. Nashville fashion designer Manny Cuevas, known for dressing some of the biggest stars in the music industry, was inspired to run due to his own personal journey with an ostomy. He was cheered on by family and friends and accompanied on the course by a daughter. Local organizer Deborah Nelson felt particularly blessed to have Manny there because of his resilience in light of medical setbacks, and also his advocacy. “He went to the state of Tennessee to get a proclamation enacted for the state to adopt this ostomy awareness day. Not only is he an advocate for nurses and other ostomates, but he is an awesome representative,” she said while awarding him the medal in the ostomate category of the run/walk.

Manny Cuevas after the Cookeville, TN Run for Resilience Ostomy 5k

In Arizona, the first-year event had a festive atmosphere. A picnic and music inside a ramada shelter welcomed competitors returning from a stroll along the lakes in Mesa’s Red Mountain Park. Local organizer Roxanne Camp who is a double ostomate was all smiles at the event despite being discharged from the hospital just a few days earlier. Her resilience is a testament to what the Run for Resilience Ostomy 5k is really all about.

The largest event this year was again the founding 5k in Durham, North Carolina. Though the majority of the 164 runners did not have an ostomy, ostomate Collin Jarvis repeated as the overall winner. First-time participant Molly Atwater was easy to spot as she was supported by family wearing “Molly Olly Ostomy” t-shirts. “As a brand-new ostomate, the Run for Resilience was a mountaintop experience for me. To attend an event where I was surrounded by people who knew what an ostomy was – either having an ostomy themselves, supporting a loved one with an ostomy, or working as an ostomy nurse – reminded me that I belong to such a strong and supportive community. I talked with many people over the course of the run and shared my experience in my short three months as an ostomate, learning tips and tricks for dealing with daily struggles. The coolest part of the entire event was looking around and not knowing who had an ostomy and who didn’t. And with it being a 5K, that drove home the idea that there is nothing an ostomate can’t do. I walked the race this year, but I am determined to run the whole thing next year. It’s an event that I would never miss in the future.”

The event drew runners from hundreds of miles away and again took place on the scenic American Tobacco trail and featured a popular silent auction and sponsor tents. The always popular stroller division again made this truly a family affair.

A family atmosphere was also central to the 2nd annual Ostomy 5k in Boise, Idaho. Despite frigid temperatures, 151 runners suited up for the event. Children could be seen tossing golden leaves into the air as runners passed by. They got their own chance to run in a 1-mile kids fun run.
Runners in Portland, Oregon also braved the cold to run along the Milwaukie Riverfront Park in what was the third year for the event. The event also returned to Birmingham, Alabama where the weather was much more pleasant. The Birmingham Area WOC Nurses’ Association again generously agreed to host the event. This year it was moved George Ward Park in Birmingham.

You did not have to go to any of these locations to take part in a run however. Our virtual run simply means you can walk/run in any location of your choice. You can gather with a support group, friends or family. Participants walked/ran in locations from the mountains of Colorado to the shores of Nova Scotia, or even on their own treadmill. Each participant got their own race bib number and t-shirt to recognize the awareness day.

Some virtual gatherings took on a life of their own. In Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania the mayor came out to cut a ribbon and walk at an event that attracted over 50 people. Enthusiasm for the walk was generated by organizer and ostomy nurse Gina Day had recently started the first UOAA support group in the area. “The outreach I received was priceless. I met some amazing people along the way, and appreciate all the donations I received to help bring awareness to the forefront! I realized how many lives I touched, when they all showed up and walked right next to me. I can not thank UOAA enough for their guidance and support to make this event possible for our ostomates in the Pocono region!  I look forward to next year where I can provide an official 5k walk/run for ostomy awareness in our community.”

“The local organizers really are the heart and soul of what makes this event so special, and I can’t thank them enough,” says UOAA Executive Director Christine Ryan. “Our dedicated sponsors enable us to bring the ostomy awareness event to communities across the country.”

UOAA hopes to see the Ostomy 5k grow even bigger and reach more people in 2018 when the event will coincide with World Ostomy Day on Saturday, October 6th. Tentative run/walks will be held in Nashville, Southern New Jersey and Harrison Twp. Michigan . Visit www.ostomy5k.org  or follow us on Facebook for the latest 2018 event information. To be a national or local sponsor, start a fundraiser, or inquire about organizing an event in your community, contact Christine Ryan at christine.ryan@ostomy.org or 207-985-9700. A heartfelt thank you to the following 2017 National Sponsors. Platinum- Hollister, Silver- Coloplast and Bronze- Convatec, Safe n Simple, and Hy-Tape.

By Megan Herrett

Adequately summarizing what our family has gone through over the past almost ten years requires going back to the very beginning.  Our daughter, Maggie was three months old when we realized that she looked a little jaundiced.  Our pediatrician agreed and ran what would be the first of hundreds of tests to determine what was wrong with our baby and why her liver function tests were so elevated.  After being seen by multiple specialists here in Boise for a few months, we were referred to a doctor at Primary Children’s Medical Center in Salt Lake City in November of 2008.

Photo by: Natalie Koziuk Photography (www.nkoziukphotography.com)

When Maggie was about six or seven months old, we noticed that she was starting to scratch quite a bit.  Her arms, feet, and ears were covered in scabs and scratch marks.  This itching was a side-effect of her liver not processing bile correctly – when not processed by the liver, the bile backs up into the bloodstream and circulates back through the body, resulting in an increase number of bile salts in the body.  It is these bile salts in the bloodstream that make an individual with a liver disease very itchy.

At first, we were able to control her itching through several medications but by the time she was 12 months-old, her itching had become unbearable.  At that time, her liver was deteriorating quickly and she was exhibiting some developmental delays as a result of the incessant itching.  In a matter of weeks, she had pulled out all of her hair and she was maxed out on her medication dosages.

We were presented with the option of an ostomy-placing surgery when Maggie was just over one-year-old as an alternative to a liver transplant.  The purpose of her ostomy would be to (1) drain bile from her body to combat the itching, and (2) slow the progression of her disease by giving her liver a much-needed reprieve.

To be honest, I was devastated when I first heard the words, “ostomy bag.”  I imagined a life where Maggie would never wear a bikini or be a cheerleader or be captain of her swim team – all very big concepts when you are talking about a one-year old child.  I imagined her being bullied because she was different.  But, we needed a solution…and we needed to act quickly.

Photo by: Natalie Koziuk Photography (www.nkoziukphotography.com)

Maggie underwent ostomy surgery on October 30, 2009, and we haven’t looked back.  She is now eight-years-old and is thriving health-wise as well as academically.  Additionally, she is also excelling on a competitive gymnastics team.  And although Maggie absolutely beams on the outside, she struggles with confidence because of her ostomy pouch.  She is fiercely private and does not want any of her peers to know.  My husband and I have worked tirelessly to emphasize to her that her pouch is nothing to be ashamed of – after all, it saved her life and she would not be the person she is today without it.

In 2010, we were blessed by the birth of our son, Winston.  We soon discovered that he was plagued with the same disease and would then undergo the same surgery when he was just over one-year-old.  Although this news was devastating at the time, we have come to realize that it was a blessing in disguise.  Both of them have the same liver disease and both wear ostomy pouches – commonalities that they can rely on when the going gets tough.

I can still recall my “aha moment” though – that moment when I realized that we would not be a family that sat idly by and let her pouch be a source of shame or embarrassment for her.  Maggie was probably two years old at the time and we were in the throes of potty-training, where our previous line of attack of onesies and bib overalls to prevent her from yanking her pouch off, were no longer an option.  She was finally in a shirt and a pair of pants…and her ostomy bag was peeking out from the hemline of her shirt as we left a restaurant.  A man entering the restaurant noticed her ostomy pouch and said, “Ewwwww!  What IS that?”  Although my initial reaction was one of anger and dismay, it was then that I realized that working with her would be only one piece of the puzzle – we also needed to work with the community to help educate, support and raise awareness for those like Maggie so that the shame, fear and embarrassment would fade away to empowerment and pride.

It was this “aha moment” that led me to contact the United Ostomy Associations of America in January of 2016 about bringing their Run for Resilience Ostomy 5k to Boise.  My inquiry was met with a resounding “YES!”  We held our inaugural race on Saturday, October 8th and had over 160 people registered for the 5K and Kids’ Mile events.  We even had participants, including ostomates and ostomy nurses, drive in for the race from Spokane, Washington and Lewiston! And Hollister even donated ostomy pouches to include in our race registration bags.  If nothing else, I am hopeful that this year we laid the foundation for many successful years to come and got some ostomy-related dialogue started.  Instead of “ewww,” maybe people will say, “Oh, I know what that is and that saved their life!”

The Boise Ostomy 5k is now in its 4th year! For more information on our Run for Resilience events around the country visit www.ostomy5k.org

The 5th Annual Run For Resilience Ostomy 5k will be held on Saturday, October 6, 2018.  All proceeds benefit the United Ostomy Associations of America, Inc (UOAA) charity, a 501(c)(3) organization. Donations are tax deductible.

Registration Coming Soon!

RACE DAY SCHEDULE (tentative)

7:00 a.m. Registration
8:00 a.m. 5K Run/Walk
9:00 a.m. Kids Fun Run
9:15 a.m. Awards Ceremony

Kids Activities and bidding at the silent auction throughout the morning

RACE COURSE

The race will be held near the Southpoint Mall area of Durham. The race will take participants on the scenic American Tobacco Trail (ATT) over the new I-40 bridge extension.  The out-and-back course will start and finish at the parking lot on the grassy knoll next to the ATT located off of Renaissance Parkway in Durham, NC.  The turn-around will be on the ATT, just before where the trail crosses Dunhill Drive. This 5K course is flat except for one uphill section on the ATT just south of the I-40 bridge.  This course is a timed race.

PARKING

Ample parking is located at the Renaissance Village shops off of Renaissance Parkway at 8160 Renaissance Pkwy, Durham, NC 27713

PACKET PICKUP

Pre-race Packet Pick up:  To be Announced…

PRIZES

Prizes will be awarded to the top 3 male and top 3 female overall finishers, age group winners, Stroller winner, and the top 3 ostomates.

AGE CATEGORIES
<15
15-19
20-29
30-39
40-49
50-59
60+

T-SHIRTS

Tech T-shirts will be included with registration if registered before the deadline. Race shirts will be either unisex or female v-neck cut. You are guaranteed a race shirt if you register by September 20th. You may purchase additional race shirts for $10 each.

OPTIONAL OSTOMY POUCH

Race registration bags will have typical race/sponsor promotional items, ostomy education materials, and most importantly an ostomy pouch. We encourage non-ostomate participants to put on the pouch for the race to improve awareness and empathy for the challenges faced by people living with ostomies.

FAMILY ACTIVITIES

The Run for Resilience Ostomy 5k will be a family-friendly event including kids’ activities during the event.  Specific kids’ activities include:

– 50-meter dash

– Face Painting

-Cornhole

-Coloring

FUNDRAISING

Set up your own personal or team fundraising site and get your friends and family to reach your fundraising goals.  If you raise over $250, you will receive a unique and limited fundraising tech shirt.  Stay tuned for the new fundraising site.

SPONSORSHIP

If you are interested in sponsoring the race, please contact us at 5kregistration@ostomy.org!

DONATIONS

We will be having an incentivized fundraising challenge for those individuals who raise over $250. Those who raise $250+ will receive a custom t-shirt.  Please visit www.ostomy5k.org for more information!

 

Events

Ready, set, go! It’s time to get your walking or running shoes on and plan to participate in UOAA’s 3rd Annual Nashville, TN Run for Resilience Ostomy 5K on Saturday, October 12, 2019.

NEW Location! This timed 5K race and 1 mile Children’s Fun Run will be held at Shelby Park located at Shelby Avenue & S. 20th Avenue in Nashville. With over 336 acres of land, and celebrating its 100th year anniversary, Shelby Park is a large, urban multi-use park along the Cumberland River featuring river views; migratory bird and other wildlife viewing opportunities.

This event is held annually to raise awareness of this life-saving surgery, empower those living with an ostomy or continent diversion, and raise funds to support UOAA’s programs and services. We encourage you to invite your family, friends, co-workers, caregivers and others to join you at this special event to walk, run or just enjoy the family-friendly festivities.

All proceeds benefit the United Ostomy Associations of America, Inc. (UOAA), a 501(c)(3) organization. Donations are tax deductible.

CLICK HERE to learn more about this event, sign-up to participate, create or join a fundraising team, and donation options.

Ready, set, go! It’s time to get your walking or running shoes on and plan to participate in UOAA’s 5th Annual Vancouver, WA (formerly Portland, OR) Run for Resilience Ostomy 5K on Saturday, October 5, 2019.

NEW this year, the Fun Run/Walk will take place at Marine Park, located at SE Marine Park Way & Columbia Way, Vancouver, WA.  This 58.3-acre community park is connected to Esther Short and Wintler parks by the Columbia River Renaissance Trail.

This Run/Walk is held annually to raise awareness of this life-saving surgery, empower those living with an ostomy or continent diversion, and raise funds to support UOAA’s programs and services. We encourage you to invite your family, friends, co-workers, caregivers and others to join you at this special event to walk, run or just enjoy the family-friendly festivities.

All proceeds benefit the United Ostomy Associations of America, Inc. (UOAA), a 501(c)(3) organization. Donations are tax deductible.

CLICK HERE to learn more about this event, sign-up to participate, create or join a fundraising team, and donation options.

Join the Nationwide Run For Resilience Virtual Ostomy 5k at Your Favorite Place to Walk/Run/Roll this Ostomy Awareness Day: October 5, 2019

If you are interested in participating in the Run for Resilience Ostomy 5k but are unable to physically attend the live events in AL, AZ, ID, MI, NC, NJ, PA, TN or WA, you can still sign-up and participate in your own virtual 5k walk/run/roll on October 5, 2019 or on a date convenient for you! You can also support the cause by donating or fundraising on behalf of UOAA.

1. CLICK HERE to register for the Virtual Ostomy 5k event!

2. Run, walk or roll a 5k (3.1 miles) route on a track, park or a location of your choice near you! You can even run/walk on a treadmill.

3. There is no cost to participate! Gather your family and friends to have a great time, and to Run for Resilience! To ensure that you receive your free race Bib, please register by Monday, September 30th at 1:00 p.m. EST, otherwise your Bib will be emailed to you.

4. You can order a special Ostomy Awareness Day technical race t-shirt when you sign up for the virtual race.  When registering, choose the option for Virtual Ostomy 5k – Including Technical T-shirt.  The $15.00 fee includes shipping. To receive the T-Shirt size ordered, please register by Friday, September 13th. There is no guarantee you will receive this T-Shirt size chosen after this date. (Shirts and bibs can only be shipped to the USA and Canada) Additional donations are appreciated to help offset costs. Bib numbers can be emailed worldwide.

5. Take pictures of yourself doing your virtual race and tag us on Facebook or e-mail them to us at 5kregistration@ostomy.org! Photos will be posted on the www.ostomy5k.org website and the Ostomy 5k Facebook page after the run.

6. Hashtag your photos #RunforResilience and we may repost on Twitter or Instagram. Promote ostomy awareness and education to your family, friends and community during Ostomy Awareness Day. Post your experience to the Ostomy 5k Facebook page.

7. Create a Fundraising Page or Team and raise money ostomy awareness, advocacy and support. Proceeds will go to UOAA.

8. Don’t run or walk but want to get involved with Ostomy Awareness Day? No problem visit https://www.ostomy.org to write a proclamation request or a letter to the editor, join the fun on social media, and much, much more.

CLICK HERE to learn more to Register, Donate or start a Fundraising Team today!

Ready, set, go! It’s time to get your walking or running shoes on and plan to participate in UOAA’s 4th Annual Birmingham, AL Run for Resilience Ostomy 5K on Saturday, September 28, 2019.

This year’s Fun Run/Walk will take place at a NEW Location – Avondale Park, a 37-acre tree-filled park featuring a lake, an amphitheater, baseball diamonds & more.

Kids activities and vendors will be open throughout the duration of the event. This Run/Walk is held annually to raise awareness of this life-saving surgery, empower those living with an ostomy or continent diversion, and raise funds to support UOAA’s programs and services. We encourage you to invite your family, friends, co-workers, caregivers and others to join you at this special event to walk, run or just enjoy the family-friendly festivities.

All proceeds benefit the United Ostomy Associations of America, Inc. (UOAA), a 501(c)(3) organization. Donations are tax deductible.

CLICK HERE to learn more about this event, sign-up to participate, create or join a fundraising team, and donation options.