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There are many things to think about when preparing for a trip. Whether traveling a few hours from home, or to another country, for a dream vacation, or for business, the more prepared you are, the more at ease you will feel. Luckily, there are resources available to assist you in planning for all sorts of travel destinations. Coloplast® Care offers comprehensive support for all areas of life, including tips on packing and planning for your trip. Making sure you have extra supplies, and the right contacts for any additional supplies you might need in case of an emergency at your destination will keep your mind calm and clear and allow for you to spend time enjoying your trip instead of worrying about the ‘what-ifs’ often associated with having an ostomy.

Traveling with your service animal can require a little extra preparation. If you are flying to your destination, be sure to save yourself time and hassle by calling the airline to understand their unique regulations and specifications, and to give them any additional information they may need about your unique situation. Here is a helpful checklist to ensure you have all the documentation you might need:

  • Certificate of your service animal
  • Current health records (including up to date vaccinations)
  • A note from your healthcare professional
  • A note from your veterinary clinic
  • A personal travel certificate which explains your condition, the medical supplies you are carrying and why you might need support and privacy as you go through security

Note that it can be extra helpful to have these documents already translated into the language of the country you will be visiting.

Depending on your destination, you might also want to look into other requirements, for example, if you are flying to an island such as Hawaii, there may be a quarantine period for your animal. If your travel plans are taking you to a country in Europe, making sure you have an ISO microchip is important as not all microchips can be read in different countries.

Leading up to the hours before your trip, you may want to limit food and water if your animal will be on a train or plane for several hours. Be sure to carry water for them to have as soon as you land. If your travels are by car, plan a route with easy places to stop to allow your animal to relieve themselves and get some exercise.

In the Airport

Arrive earlier than normal to the airport to ensure you have plenty of time to go through security and find your gate. Make sure the security personnel are aware that your animal is a service animal, this should help to speed up your security check and move you through faster. You should not have to be separated from your service animal at any time, it is your right and privilege to have them accompany you at all times.

Most airlines require a 48-hour advance notice of service animals on flights, be sure to contact your airline to make them aware that you will be traveling with your service animal, and ask any questions you might have about the day of travel.

Hotel Stays

Similar to your airline travel, you may want to contact your hotel before your stay. Let them know you will be traveling with your service animal and ask them to inform their staff. As a service animal is not a pet, they cannot be refused in any public space. As well, a hotel cannot charge a fee for having a service animal stay in a room unless they cause damage. Be sure to clean up after your dog as you would at home, and never leave your service animal in the hotel room alone. Even the best-trained ones can become anxious or stressed if left unattended in a new atmosphere.

Lastly, once you reach your destination, should you have any questions or need any medical supplies or advice, Coloplast has put together a downloadable list of all of their local offices around the world.  The more prepared you are before you travel, the more you will enjoy the trip and be at ease. Happy Travels!

For more information, visit www.coloplast.us.

 

Editor’s note: This educational article is from one of our digital sponsors, Coloplast. Sponsor support along with donations from readers like you help to maintain our website and the free trusted resources of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Enjoy a trouble-free transit with these travel tips.

If you’re traveling by airplane, car, bus, train, or cruise ship, you might be stressed about your ostomy needs during the trip. Don’t worry. With a little preparation, everything can go smoothly.

It’s also a good idea to start with short trips away from home to build up your confidence. Once you’re reassured that your pouching system stays secure during normal day-to-day activities, you can start to venture farther.

Here are a few tips to help you be fully prepared and comfortable, no matter how you travel.

Luggage weight limits: Are you traveling by air with a lot of supplies? Check with your airline and your country’s federal travel agency (e.g., the Transportation Security Administration in the United States) for the luggage weight limit. Weigh the luggage before you go. It may be helpful to use a portable luggage scale. If you’re over the limit, check to see if your airline has a special allowance for medical supplies.

Forbidden items: The International Air Transport Association (IATA) forbids dangerous items on board airplanes. For example, ether, methylated spirits, or flammable aerosol adhesives and removers are considered fire hazards. Scissors also may not be allowed in carry-on luggage – check with your airline or pre-cut all of your skin barriers before traveling.

Pre-boarding security checks: At airports, your carry-on luggage will be inspected at the security baggage check before boarding. If you have medications, get a card from your healthcare professional that explains why you need them. Some countries do not allow certain medications, such as codeine, to cross their borders. A travel communications card from an ostomy association in your country may also be available. United Ostomy Associations of America (UOAA) offers a travel card to help you be ready for searches or checkpoint questions.

Using airplane toilets: During a long flight, there can be long lines for toilets, especially after meals. Be alert for a chance to use the toilet when most people are in their seats. It’s also a good idea to request a seat near a toilet.

Car travel: Your car seat belt should sit across your hip bone and pelvis, not your abdomen and stoma. If you want to give your stoma extra protection from the strap, you can buy a seat belt pad. You can also use an extension bracket to lower the angle of the belt across your body.

Cruising with a stoma: Are you worried about taking a river, lake, or ocean cruise? Don’t be. If you’ll be away from land for a few days or more, just pack double the supplies you need. Plus, follow these simple precautions and you’ll have a trouble-free voyage.

View or print the full PDF booklet Living with an Ostomy: Travel from Hollister.com.

For similar articles on traveling with an ostomy and other topics, visit the Hollister Ostomy Care Learning Center.

Editor’s note: This educational article is from one of our digital sponsors, Hollister Incorporated. Sponsor support along with donations from readers like you help to maintain our website and the free trusted resources of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Traveling through airports can make anybody nervous as security lines get longer and wait times increase. For some people living with an ostomy, air travel can cause further anxiety.

Universal pat-downs performed by Transportation Security Administration (TSA) agents and uncertainty surrounding procedures at the screening checkpoint can add to an already stressful experience.

Luckily, United Ostomy Associations of America (UOAA) is working on your behalf to help make your next airport security screening run as smoothly as possible. But you need to be prepared beyond just packing the right supplies and emptying your pouch before a flight. With our tips and latest guidance from the TSA, you’ll be empowered with the knowledge to help make your next travel experience a positive one.

“We have been working with the TSA for over three years now and have established an excellent working relationship,” says George Salamy UOAA’s TSA Liaison and representative on the Coalition. In fact, at a past TSA Disability and Multicultural Conference, OAA was the recipient of a Community Participation Award.  “Recognition by the TSA with this award illustrates how we are helping our constituents, the ostomates, who want to travel with little inconvenience,” George says.

One way we do this is by participating in conference calls where we provide input from the UOAA traveler perspective. The system is a work-in-progress and complaints about invasive searches outside of protocol, though rare, still occur.

Communication is critical in navigating the security process. Inform the TSA officer that you have an ostomy pouch before the screening process begins. For discretion, you may provide the officer with the TSA notification card or a medical document describing an ostomy. Expect to be screened without having to empty or expose the ostomy through the advanced imaging technology, metal detector, or a pat-down. If your ostomy pouch is subject to the additional screening you’ll be asked to conduct a self pat-down of the ostomy pouch outside of your clothing, followed by a test of your hands for any trace of explosives.

You may also undergo a standard pat-down of areas that will not include the ostomy pouch. Remember it is normal protocol for agents to request a pat-down of any travelers. Be aware however that at any point during the process you can ask for a Supervisory TSA Officer, and a private area for the screening as well as be accompanied by your travel companion.

As an ostomy traveler, if an incident occurs that differentiates from the protocol (such as being asked to undress the area around your ostomy) know that this is not allowed. It is important to report this to the TSA and follow-up with UOAA to ensure appropriate and immediate action is taken. Upon review of security footage corrective action may be taken in the form of additional training and/or discussions with appropriate personnel at the airport to help prevent similar incidents from happening again.

Before your next trip view our tips for ostomy travelers. We will continue to educate and communicate with the TSA with the goal of making travel easier for all those traveling with an ostomy. No people living with an ostomy should ever be discouraged from travel whether for work, to see family and friends, a vacation or a journey around the world.