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By Jeanine Gleba UOAA Advocacy Manager

Every three years, ostomates around the world come together to celebrate World Ostomy Day on the first Saturday in October.  This year it will be held on October 2, 2021 and the European Ostomy Association (EOA) has declared the motto as “Ostomates’ Rights Are Human Rights – anytime and anywhere!” It is an opportunity for the world to join forces to increase public acceptance of ostomy surgery and to help people to better understand that health is a human right for everyone.

During the Covid19 pandemic the ostomy community around the world has been impacted such as ostomy nurse visits in the home being reduced and peer-to-peer support visits from an ostomy mentor in the hospital stopped.  In some countries, there has been limited access to ostomy supplies due to supply chain issues and/or limited access to affordable ostomy appliances. As a result, the EOA wanted to rekindle a focus on the Charter of Ostomates Rights

In the United States an ongoing UOAA advocacy initiative is to improve the quality of ostomy health care and ensure higher standards of care in all health care settings. One strategy to drive this change has been the utilization of the “You Matter! Know What to Expect and Know Your Rights Ostomy and Continent Diversion Patient Bill of Rights” as it specifically defines what high quality care should be expected and received during the ostomy surgical experience and for continuum of care. 

With the World Ostomy Day motto we will join the worldwide movement and the EOA’s goal to: “underline that ostomate rights are not negotiable. They must be respected by governments, politicians, healthcare authorities, companies and suppliers, by doctors and nurses, by every human and by every society – even in uncertain times.” 

Quality ostomy care should be provided to all regardless of race/ethnicity, age, gender, religion, place of birth, health or other status (even having an ostomy!). This World Ostomy Day you can help us drive change in the United States. Share the newly revised patient bill of rights poster (11×17 for printing purposes) with your ostomy surgeon, GI doctor, Primary Care Physician and/or ostomy nurse.  Ask them to ensure that these standards of care are utilized in their practice. 

As always there will be many other fun and important ways that people can participate in this year’s celebration! You can:

  • Attend an Online Event. UOAA 2021 Ostomy Awareness Day Champion Allison Rosen will kick-off the day with a Facebook/Instagram Live on the morning of October 2nd and also host a candid Q&A that evening. UOAA representatives will also take part in a host of ostomy educational events with partner organizations and others leading up to and immediately after World Ostomy Day. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and TikTok for updates.
  • Watch our brand-new Ostomy and Continent Diversion Patient Bill of Rights animated series (Link available in September during the weeks leading up to World Ostomy Day)
  • Walk, Run, Roll or Pedal at UOAA’s 2021 Virtual Run for Resilience Ostomy 5k anywhere in the world. Register here and you’ll have the option to get our special World Ostomy Day t-shirt. This virtual event helps UOAA raise much-needed funds to improve quality of life for people living with an ostomy or continent diversion
  • Help UOAA get a proclamation declaring World Ostomy Day from all 50 states!  A sample is also available to download on our webpage noted below or you can take action at the state level here.
  • Upload our special “frame” for your social media profile photos that says you speak up for ostomy rights and use the hashtags: #WorldOstomyDay, #OstomyRights, #MyAccessMatters
  • Submit a letter to the editor of your local newspaper or reach out to local media. 
  • And so much more!

Visit the World Ostomy Day webpage for further details about the special events and the full list of all the ways to get involved.  

Let’s make the voice of ostomates in the United States heard around the world this year!

2019 Advocacy Accomplishments We Can All be Proud of

By UOAA Advocacy Manager Jeanine Gleba

I pride myself on being an “action person” and nothing gives me greater satisfaction than checking those boxes and crossing off items on my lists to-do (daily, short-term, long-term etc) both in my personal life and professionally. So I get super excited at year-end when I can reflect and look back at all that UOAA has accomplished in our advocacy efforts!  I’m happy to report 2019 was not an exception. Although many priorities are ongoing and I can’t actually cross them off my list, I remind myself that Rome was not built in a day and realize to make a major impact in the health care world it could take many years. The important thing for all of us to remember is that we are making progress and positive change is happening.

UOAA Ostomy Advocates at the DDNC

Ostomy advocates at the DDNC Public Policy Forum in March.

Each year UOAA’s Advocacy Committee establishes annual goals based on the strategies outlined in UOAA’s Advocacy Agenda. We have learned that the needs of the ostomy community are fluid and more often than not, I find each year that new priorities must get added to the list. These goals and priorities keep us organized and ensure we stay focused on where we can have the most effect given our organization’s limited resources.

In no particular order and not an all-inclusive list below will give you an idea of what we worked on and accomplished in 2019. This does not include Ostomy Awareness Day efforts as they were previously shared: 

Completed the “Expect More: Take Control of Your Healthcare” self-advocacy toolkit with checklistsAll of the parts and resources are online here. In 2019 there were 579 downloads of the resources and the ostomy supply checklist had the most downloads at 247.

Best in Practice Research Project Launched – The purpose of this research project is to examine components of UOAA’s Ostomy and Continent Diversion Patient Bill of Rights (PBOR) and demonstrate best in practice standard guidelines for ostomy care. In 2019 we collected the data, in 2020 we will conduct the data analysis phase, publish results and ideally find ways to use the results to improve patient outcomes.

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Ostomy Supply Policy 

  • Conducted an online survey earlier and analyzed results to better understand the issue of obtaining greater than allowable quantities for those that have a medical necessity such as a high output stoma
  • Submitted comments and recommendations from UOAA to CMS for the Simplifying Documentation Initiative (SDI) and the Patients Over Paperwork Initiative to reduce burden as it relates to the ostomy supply process. 
  • We have a subcommittee comprised of medical professionals, manufacturer representatives, and patient advocates who will continue this effort in 2020.

Legislative Priorities 

  • Advocated on the Disability Integration Act (DIA), Removing Colorectal Screening Barriers, Ostomy Awareness Day, Step Therapy, and Competitive Bidding Program
  • Released two new position statements for DIA and Opioids
  • Supported the DDNC Step Therapy National Day of Advocacy

Additional Efforts to Expand Patient Bill of Rights

  • Safe n Simple is now including the PBOR Wallet Card in new ostomy patient starter kits and Byram Healthcare now includes it in their ostomy educational booklet

Further Advocacy Outreach and Collaborations 

  • Upfront with Ostomies Column: As a result of contacting the editor of the Wound Management Prevention journal UOAA now has its own column in this clinician journal.  5 articles were published in 2019
  • UOAA was invited by the CMS Quality organization to submit a new idea for the 2021 Improvement Activities used in the Merit-based Incentive Payment System. Ex-committee Member Barbara Dale and I submitted for consideration two modifications to existing improvement activities that focuses on re-evaluation of ostomy care and supplies
  • Access and Care Coalition: Successfully continued to ensure Congress refrains from expanding the Medicare Competitive Bidding program to include ostomy and urological supplies 
  • 3172 people downloaded the TSA Travel Communication Card
  • Started efforts with OEM of LAX airport in CA to make restroom improvements for ostomy accessibility; created UOAA guidelines for United States ostomy restroom accommodations 
  • Between myself and members of the Advocacy Committee we authored or contributed to 18 magazine and UOAA e-newsletter articles on advocacy-related topics

Looking forward to greater achievements in 2020!

By Ed Pfueller, UOAA

Amazing things can happen when ostomy patient advocates and clinicians come together.

Dr. Neilanjan Nandi, MD an IBD specialist at Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia, trained in cities across the country and has long observed that “physicians were not comfortable with stoma care and troubleshooting as we should be.” “I learned early on the importance of knowing as much as possible by working with my patients.”

He decided to organize the hospital’s first “Hands On Ostomy Workshop” to empower his medical students, residents, and gastroenterology fellows with formal education.

To help bridge this gap with patients Hahnemann Outpatient WOC nurse Josephine Catanarzo suggested connecting the program with leaders of the Philadelphia’s UOAA Affiliated Support Group.

Stanley Cooper and the Philadelphia Ostomy Association, that is celebrating 70 years of service, and have a long history of talking to nursing students. They viewed this as another opportunity to bridge the gap between patients and those who serve them.

“The surgical staff and fellows got to hear directly from our engaging and dynamic patient panel about their experiences medically and personally with a stoma. This was the MOST profound aspect of the entire workshop. You can learn the medical and surgical nuances in textbooks. BUT you cannot understand the psychosocial impact unless you hear it directly and eloquently from our patients. Thank you to United Ostomy Associations of America patient advocates Sheldon, Stanley and the wonderful Stacey for taking he time to enlighten us!” Dr. Nandi says.

“We absolutely loved attending this,” Stanley says.  “For the Philadelphia Ostomy Association and UOAA it made Hahnemann aware that locally we have been in the Philadelphia area since 1949.  That we have a visiting service and that all our visitors are trained at a visitor’s training class that was developed by UOAA.  We had a lot of discussion on how today’s short hospital stays affect visits and a lot of times we can meet patients at their homes or at a restaurant for visits and that all helps in the patient’s rehabilitation.”

“Stanley was absolutely and overwhelmingly supportive of this initiative and brought in valuable educational resources courtesy of the UOAA for our surgical house staff. He was also able to provide us educational brochures to distribute to our patients as well,” Dr. Nandi says.

If you, your support group, or hospital is interested in some of UOAA’s educational guides you can view them here on ostomy.org or request printed materials, such as our New Ostomy Patient Guide. Our various Ostomy Patient Bill of Rights including practices for nurses to support their patients also help to educate and bridge the divides between patients and caregivers.

In addition to WOC nurses Josephine Catanarzo and Judi DiPerri  Hahnemann’s Colorectal surgeon David Stein was also invited to be a part of the workshop. Dr. Stein discussed what is involved in stoma site mapping and planning. The nurses shared clinical pearls on troubleshooting and application of ostomies.

“This was  truly was an amazing program!” Dr. Nandi says. “We learned about their individual stories and experiences with an ostomy and how they have continued to be true patient advocates within our greater community.”

One of Dr. Nandi’s patients Stacey Cavanaugh also provided her unique patient experience to the group.

“At our next event we are taking a suggestion from Anastasia, or Stacey, as she is affectionately known, and planning to have our docs wear an ostomy appliance for a day filled with fluid and to write about their experience and share it with the group. I think it will be more than novel and truly insightful for our young, and old! learners to gather. I also hope to invite other fellowship programs to attend our next ostomy workshop too.”

It’s inspiring what a few committed medical professionals and ostomy patients can do when they come together. Consider reaching out and bridging the gap where you live or work.

 

You can hear Dr. Nandi speak at this summer’s UOAA National Conference or connect with him on social media @fitwitmd  

To get involved with your local support group click here or follow our advocacy initiatives for other ways to make an impact.