Posts

 

Getting to a place where you feel confident in yourself and your new routine might take some time. There are many factors to consider following your ostomy surgery, but there are also many resources available to you while you are adjusting to normal life. Having a thriving social life is not out of the question, and with some time and patience with your body, you will be living your best life.

Beginning Stages

In the beginning, it will be important to keep some sort of a journal or diary as you experiment with new foods and beverages. Figuring out how different foods and beverages affect your body will influence your social life with regards to dining out. It might be helpful to eat smaller meals more often throughout your day as you record what foods tend to cause more gas or which foods are harder for your body to break down. Remember to drink lots of water and chew your food well.

As you move from blander and softer foods to a more regular and high-fiber foods, you will notice more regularity in your bowel movements. Understanding your body’s schedule will be key in planning outings, dates, and events. As you begin to venture out of the house more, remember to bring extra supplies with you and locate the restrooms should you need one with short notice.

Getting Out There

As your confidence builds, and your ostomy becomes routine and normal to you, saying ‘yes’ to more things will become easier and easier. If you were an active person before your surgery, you will be able to resume your active lifestyle. Whether going to the gym, running along the beach, hiking through a forest, or playing a pick-up game of basketball, exercise is key to keeping you mentally, emotionally and physically fit. While you will need to be cautious in the beginning so you can fully heal, there are few limitations on what your body can do with ostomy. If you are having a hard time figuring out what clothing or specific products will help to keep things in place during your activities, Coloplast has put together solutions for a variety of different sports and activities.

Making friends aware of your new ostomy can be intimidating at first. Preparing an informative, concise story to tell people may help ease your mind. Connecting with your friends and family can help you to stay positive and hopeful and will make the transition back to regular life much more manageable. Share as little or as much as you feel comfortable about your ostomy, but keep in mind that talking about it can be beneficial to both parties.

If you are in a romantic relationship, it is likely that your partner is already aware of your surgery and new ostomy. Good communication and honesty about your feelings and your partner’s feelings will be vital to the future of your relationship. It may take time for you to feel ready to be sexually active following your surgery, but exploring this as a couple and in the timing that works best for you will go a long way in helping your relationship succeed.

Meet Others Like You

You are not alone in this new change to your body. There are many people living with an ostomy already out there who are interested in connecting and sharing their stories. It can be helpful to talk to someone who is in a similar situation and who will understand the ups and downs of this new routine. Getting connected to a group or network that shares your story can be radically healing and help with your confidence and self-esteem, not to mention broaden your social network. If you aren’t ready to venture out to a group just yet, you may want to begin by watching and hearing stories from others living with an ostomy to see how they were able to travel, date, go back to work, stay active, and enjoy a healthy sex life.

Whatever stage you are at in your recovery and healing process; if you are adapting to a new routine with your pouching system or working your way to sexual confidence with a partner, know that it is possible. While it may feel daunting to say yes to a date or go out to dinner with a group of friends, with just a little extra planning and the support of others, you can have a thriving social life with an ostomy.

 

Editor’s note: This article is from one of our digital sponsors, Coloplast. Sponsor support along with donations from readers like you help to maintain our website and the free trusted resources of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

My name is Jodi Capobianco, I am 54 years old and have a permanent ileostomy.  Five years ago I was diagnosed with severe off-the-charts constipation and was to receive a temporary loop ileostomy.

I am so thankful that I did not let having an ostomy get in the way of me missing out on this awesome adventure.

Shortly after my surgery, I began having problems. To make a long story short, my colon became diseased and they removed it giving me a permanent ileostomy.  Unfortunately, shortly after my colon was removed I developed an abscess.  I actually ended up developing seven more before an amazing surgeon figured out that I had a leak.  He performed a small bowel resection and made my loop ileostomy an end.  That was over two years ago.  I was so weak when I came home I was using a walker.  I can honestly say life is now amazing. In fact, I just got back from rafting the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon for eight days.

There were no bathrooms, heck there was no nothing just the big outdoors. I went with my husband, our trip started on a Saturday morning when we flew from Boston to Arizona. I was pretty pumped when my ostomy was not an issue while going through security.  Not that it is a big deal to be patted down, but it was nice to be able to skip it.  When I fly I try to limit my intake so I am not having to empty on the plane.  I also stay away from anything carbonated when I am out, so no bubbles.  We arrived in Arizona after traveling for about 9 hours. We headed to our hotel, where of course our room was not ready and got lunch.  I knew I would be near a bathroom for the afternoon and evening so I ate what I wanted.

That night was the orientation for the trip. I learned we would on the bus for about three hours the next morning with no bathroom break. Departure time was 6:45 am.  I decided not to eat breakfast but brought a bagel with me. I ate about an hour into the trip. I knew I would be able to use a porta-potty at the boat launch.  On the morning of the trip I changed out everything.  I ended up using wafers that were precut.  I usually cut my own but I did not want to have to deal with that. I used closed-ended bags that were waterproof. I am usually a drainable girl, but again I knew there really would not be a place to drain anything especially during the day. I also used three brava strips for reinforcement, and I use a ring under my wafer.

I had two complete changes in my dry bag, then in my shorts or pants I had three bags in a zipper pocket, I also kept a bag in my backpack in case we went hiking.

We were all given two dry bags for our stuff, one we could get to during the day and one we could not.  In my day bag, I had enough supplies to do two complete changes, 5 disposable closed ended bags as well as five bags I could put the disposable bags in.  The first night when we stopped at camp I was given my own ammo box.  This was a metal box that sealed.  I was able to put all my waste into it.  In the morning I would give the box to the trip leader, she would empty it and then when we stopped at camp for the night she would discretely give it back to me. The only bathroom in the camps were either behind a tree or rock and they consisted of a yellow bucket with a toilet seat on it to pee in and a metal bucket that contained waste.  I would pee in the yellow bucket but luckily did not have to deal with the smelly bucket for pooping in.  I would simply pop bags on and off when I needed to.

When we arrived at the camp for the night, which generally was a large sandy area by the side of the river, we all helped unload the boats.  Once the boats were unloaded, one would find their campsite for the night, lay out a tarp and sleeping pad. This is when I would take a minute to get organized. For me, this consisted of placing two closed-ended bags and baggies in a plastic cup near my sleeping bag.  This was so I could change in the middle of the night if I needed to. I also would place my headlamp nearby so I could find it easily in the dark and see what I was doing.

When popping a pouch on and off, I would place a small baggie (I used the blue ones that came with my bags) under the disposable bag so when I unclicked and popped it off it went right into that bag.  Next, I would pop on a new pouch and be good to go.  For the most part, I changed bags when we got to camp, right before bed, once in the middle of the night and when I woke up.

Having the precut wafers and closed ended pouches made all the difference in the world.

During the day I would set myself up as follows:  I had two complete changes in my dry bag, then in my shorts or pants I had three bags in a zipper pocket, I also kept a bag in my backpack in case we went hiking.  I would change bags after breakfast before getting on the boat and when we stopped for lunch.  I was generally good until we got back to a camp.

To change I would hide behind a rock or a tree or sit on my sleeping bag with my back to everyone.  I also had a small package of biodegradable baby wipes with me.

There were two times I had to change everything.  The first was three days into the trip.  I got off the boat and my skin itched.  This is generally a sign for me that something is leaking.  I had been in the water a ton this day so I was not surprised.  I peeled off all the adhesive from the brava strips as best I could, dried the area off, and put on a new wafer and popped on another bag.  The second time was two days later.  I knew that this time I really needed to wash the area and try to get a bit of the adhesive off my skin.  So, I went down to the river with a small washcloth that I had packed.  I took everything off and dipped the washcloth in the river and then scrubbed my skin as best I could.  I dried the area, covered my stoma with the cloth and went back to my campsite where I put on a new ring, wafer, brava strips and pouch. I did this all while trying not to get any sand on my skin.  Having the precut wafers and closed ended pouches made all the difference in the world.

The last day on the river was a half day.  Once we got off the boats we are onto a bus for three hours.   Luckily there was a real bathroom stop.  Here I just switched out bags.  We got back to the hotel and into the shower I went.  I had so much adhesive on my skin.  I used a ton of adhesive remover, then took a face cloth and washed the whole area.  My skin looked pretty good for being engulfed in adhesive for 8 days lol.  It took a while to get all the adhesive off.  It felt amazing when it was.  Obviously, when I got out of the shower I dried off and put on a new ring, wafer and bag, no brava strips.  My skin was very happy for this.

I am so thankful that I did not let having an ostomy get in the way of me missing out on this awesome adventure. I refuse to let anything get in my way of living.  I attribute the success of this trip to closed-ended bags, precut wafers, being organized but also for patting myself on the back and having an awesome attitude.

By Ellyn Mantell

From the time I can remember, constipation was always an issue for me. I assumed I was doing something wrong to cause it. It turns out that I was born, like so many, with a redundant foot of bowel, which in layman’s terms, means that my colon was not only oversized, but a portion of it went in the wrong direction. Here is what I mean…the colon or large intestine ascends on the right side (ascending colon) and goes across the abdomen (the transverse colon) and descends the left side (the descending colon.) That is exactly the path that stool takes in its journey to leave the body. My redundant foot of bowel meant that the transverse colon actually went up at the connection to the descending colon, for a foot, before heading downward, so stool had to travel against gravity before leaving my body.

My first barium enema was when I was 10 years-old, and although we didn’t know what the problem was, I was always told at that time, and every subsequent test, that my sluggish bowel would be an issue for me, (and it truly was, until my ileostomy 6 years ago). So, it came as no surprise that I was also told, each colonoscopy or c-t scan, that I had severe diverticulosis, which could become diverticulitis, a problem that often requires medical intervention.

The diverticula are small sacs that form along the mucosal lining of the colon, often due to straining to move stool through the intestinal tract, which puts pressure on the intestinal wall (which causes the bulging). This issue can worsen with age, medications and other causes of constipation. If the diverticula are inflamed or rupture, serious infection can result, which then is called diverticulitis.

While diverticulosis doesn’t cause discomfort, diverticulitis can be terribly painful, cause fever, constipation or diarrhea, nausea and fatigue. Several in our Ostomy Support Group have had resections of their colon and ostomies due to diverticulitis. Some choose to be reversed after the several weeks of healing necessary to allow the connection in the intestine to do its job. Others choose, instead, to live with their ostomy, which offers them freedom from constipation.

There are ways to avoid diverticulitis, and they are manageable for most. Eating a high-fiber diet rich with fruits and vegetables and whole grains is a great place to start. You may remember that I have also mentioned that is a smart way to enhance our immune system, which may help fight Covid-19. Add more fluids, and if possible, pitted watermelon, for an extra kick of fluid. These tips will soften waste and help it pass more quickly through your colon. That may reduce the risk of diverticula becoming inflamed. Also, exercise and maintaining a healthy weight are very helpful.

Many physicians recommend reducing red meat; some used to say avoid nuts and seeds, although that restriction seems to have changed. As I tell others with an ostomy especially those with an ileostomy, if you eat nuts and seeds and fresh fruits and vegetables, which are healthy and filling, please chew, chew, chew, since that is the best way to avoid inflammation or a blockage.

Many medications can impact motility of the bowels, so be mindful to changes when you add or delete medications, and please address with your physician any concerns. And most important, if you notice any changes, pain, distention, nausea, vomiting or generalized discomfort in your abdomen that has you concerned, do not wait. Speak with your physician and consult UOAA’s blockage card and don’t be hesitant to go to the Emergency Room if needed. Much can be done to not only make you feel better, but to prevent a manageable situation from becoming extremely serious!

Ellyn Mantell is a UOAA advocate and Affiliated Support Group leader from New Jersey. You can follow her personal blog at morethanmyostomy

By Ellyn Mantell

While walking this morning it occurred to me that for many Ostomates, the heat is very challenging. Ileostomates, in particular, are prone to dehydration because our stoma is always productive. In Mother Nature’s inimitable creation, the colon, or large bowel, is responsible for absorbing fluids and allowing them to be reabsorbed into the body. Since ileostomates either no longer have a colon or it is no longer being used, the precious fluids are flushed from the body through the stoma. Hence the rapid filling and refilling of the pouch, which can be worse in the heat.

Naturally, drinking water is advised. UOAA’s new ostomy nutrition guide recommends you “Make a habit of drinking water throughout the day. At the same time, limit or avoid beverages with added sugars and artificial colors and sweeteners.”  Many of us may have difficulty drinking enough to support our anatomy, so we need to be mindful of symptoms that we are lacking the hydration/dehydration balance.

Some symptoms of dehydration include headache, fatigue, dark or decreased urine, lack of concentration, dry mouth, feeling disoriented, shortness of breath, dry skin, stomach cramps. Additionally, leg cramps, loss of appetite, drowsiness, tingling in fingertips and muscle weakness are all concomitant to dehydration.

Learning to live with the chronic dehydration possibility presented to ostomates is certainly attainable. For me, since I do not have a high blood pressure issue which might preclude adding salt, it means adding it frequently at meals. It is strange to servers at restaurants when I ask for the salt shaker, and many have asked if I mean the pepper shaker? We have become a salt-resistant society. But there are those of us who need it for our fluid balance. Additionally, I have a handful of a salty snack before bed, such as pretzels, since nighttime muscle cramps can be very painful and cause sleep deprivation. I keep a bottle of tonic water in the refrigerator, as well as a jar of pickles for those times when nothing else works. For muscle cramps I recommend an over the counter foam moisture. The manufacturers recommend using it prophylactically at night, but I have found it usually very fast-acting when I have foot or leg cramps, so I apply as needed.

Many Ostomates swear by sports drinks like Gatorade, but truthfully, although I have a bottle in the refrigerator at all times in case of fever, I find it difficult to drink. However, if presented with the option of drinking it or winding up in the Emergency Room for fluids, I will imbibe gladly! It’s recommended you dilute sports drinks to reduce the sugar content as well. At some of our Support Group meetings I have heard of many different electrolyte balancing drinks and powders, so you may find one that works for you.

UOAA recommends you drink 8–10, eight-ounce glasses of water/fluid daily. If you have a urostomy this also helps prevent UTIs and keeps urine diluted. Concentrated urine also can cause odor.

View UOAA’s Eating with an Ostomy Guide for more hydration tips such as avoiding excess caffeine, eating foods with a higher water content and sipping your liquids slowly.

It has been recommended that Ostomates drink more than simply water, since it flushes through the system and little gets absorbed before it exits through our pouch. Drink with meals, since food slows down the transport of fluids. Bring fluids with you when you are out and about, since being busy may cause us to forget the responsibility we have to stay hydrated. Lastly, in addition to feeling awful when we are dehydrated, being in that state puts a great deal of pressure on our kidneys, and can lead to kidney failure and lightheadedness, which can lead to falling.

Although this sounds ominous for summer fun, being mindful and smart will help us to relax and enjoy ourselves…after all, with the Covid experience, we have learned to grab the good and be grateful we are as healthy as we are!

 

Ellyn Mantell is a UOAA advocate and Affiliated Support Group leader from New Jersey. You can follow her personal blog at morethanmyostomy

Chances are you will be able to return to your normal diet not too long after your operation. It is good to keep in mind that foods that were good and healthy for your body before your operation are still good for you. A well-balanced diet is recommended for most individuals.

Although your ostomy nurse more than likely will give you tips and advise you on your health and diet, here are some alternative helpful suggestions for maintaining a proper diet after your ileostomy or colostomy surgery.

Start Small

Ease your way back to proper nutrition with small quantities of food. It is recommended to eat 3 or more times per day in smaller quantities and portions. Try to eat these meals at the same time each day to help regulate bowel movements. Eating more frequently and in smaller quantities will help aid your body’s ability to process food and help with unnecessary gas.

For the first several weeks after your surgery, eating simple and bland soft foods will be easier to digest. Keep in mind that chewing your food well also adds to the ease of digestion – the more broken up it is, the easier it will be to process. Take your time with introducing high-fiber foods back into your diet as these will be harder to digest and can cause blockages.

If you are trying new foods it is advised to try them slowly and one at a time. This will help you to have a better understanding of how your body works with the new foods and if any will cause excess gas, constipation, strange odors, or diarrhea. Slowly incorporate them into your diet and make note of how your body responds to them. Remember that every body is different and what affects someone else may not affect you in the same way, this is why it can be helpful to keep a journal or diary of how your body responds to different foods.

Drink Lots of Liquids

It is important to drink lots of liquids with an ostomy. If you have an ileostomy, even more specific ileostomy dietary guidelines will be helpful. Dehydration can happen as you lose more fluids daily after an ileostomy, due to the fluid not being reabsorbed into the large intestine. Make sure to hydrate even more on hot and humid days or if you are participating in active sports. (Sports drinks and other high electrolyte drinks can help with this.)

Coffee and tea are fine to drink, but water and juices are still better sources of liquid, so be careful not to use coffee or tea as a substitute for water.

Can I Drink Alcohol With my Ostomy?

Alcohol is fine in moderation, you may want to try one drink (or even a half) and wait and see how it affects your body. Like other carbonated beverages, beer may cause extra gas and uncomfortable bloating but every body is different and what affects one person, may not affect you in the same way.

Ostomy Problem Foods

Even though you can still enjoy most of the foods you loved before surgery, there are some foods to be aware of after your ostomy, specifically foods that are hard on digestion and can cause blockages. The following is a list of common foods that can cause problems, as they don’t break down easily:

Nuts
Seeds
Popcorn
Dried fruit
Mushrooms
Raw-crunchy vegetables

Eat these foods in small quantities and be sure to chew them well. If you think you have a food blockage, you should call your doctor or ostomy nurse. Having an ostomy certainly doesn’t mean you have to completely change your diet. By steering clear of a short list of problem foods and making sure to stay hydrated, you can get back to enjoying the foods you love.

Editor’s note: This article is from one of our digital sponsors, Coloplast. Sponsor support along with donations from readers like you help to maintain our website and the free trusted resources of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Summer is coming and it is the perfect time to not let your ostomy define who you are or what you are able to do. Enjoy these wellness tips by Elaine O’Rourke. In this video Elaine shares her insights into diet, getting moving again, confidence and even her passion for surfing.

“Look at your mindset, that may be what is holding you back not your ostomy.”

 

Make sure to grab your FREE GUIDE: ‘3 simple ways to eliminate fears about your ostomy” by visiting Elaine’s website www.ElaineOrourke.com

Elaine O’Rourke is the creator of the program “Surviving To Thriving: Overcoming Ostomy Challenges So You Can Live a FulFilling Life”. She is a certified Yoga Therapist & Teacher since 2003, Sound Healer, EFT & Reiki Practitioner, Recording Artist and International Retreat Leader. Her lighthearted and fun personality shines through her teachings/programs as she loves to inspire others. She is a contributing writer to the national Phoenix Magazine and UOAA, presenter at the UOAA National Conference and speaker at Girls with Guts retreat.  

Web: www.elaineorourke.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ostomyibdlife/ 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/elaineorourkeyoga/ 

Email: Elaine@ElaineOrourke.com 

from me+ Contributor, Sarah Biggart

You may have recently resolved to eat healthier adding fresh fruits and veggies to your diet. But wait, can you eat your way through the produce department?

Fresh fruits and veggies are a regular part of my diet. Through previous trial and error, I know there are some fruits and veggies I need to be careful of and some that I avoid. Salads and corn on the cob frequently appear on my plate. However, broccoli, kale and brussel sprouts, I eat sparingly.

As we all navigate life with an ostomy, we learn and gain knowledge along the way. Ostomy surgery allowed me to maintain my desired lifestyle. Food is such a central part of our society, with family gatherings and social outings often revolving around the table. Your ostomy should not deny you your seat at the table.

Here are some general diet guidelines:

  • Eat regularly
  • Drink plenty of fluids
  • Chew your food well
  • After surgery, try new foods one at a time, in small quantities. If there is a problem (such as gas), you can make simple adjustments that work for you.
  • Most importantly, enjoy your food!

For this article and more from ConvaTec click here.

 

Editor’s note: This nutrition information is intended for those with an ileostomy or colostomy. This article is from one of our digital sponsors, ConvaTec. Sponsor support along with donations from readers like you help to maintain our website and the free trusted resources of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Chances are you will be able to return to your normal diet not too long after your operation. It is good to keep in mind that foods that were good and healthy for your body before your operation are still good for you. A well-balanced diet is recommended for most individuals.

Although your ostomy nurse more than likely will give you tips and advise you on your health and diet, here are some alternative helpful suggestions for maintaining a proper diet after your surgery.

Follow the advice of your surgeon, dietitian, and/or WOC nurse regarding any dietary restrictions right after surgery or on a long-term basis.

Start Small

Ease your way back to proper nutrition with small quantities of food. It is recommended to eat 3 or more times per day in smaller quantities and portions. Try to eat these meals at the same time each day to help regulate bowel movements. Eating more frequently and in smaller quantities will help aid your body’s ability to process food and help with unnecessary gas.

For the first several weeks after your surgery, eating simple and bland soft foods will be easier to digest. Keep in mind that chewing your food well also adds to the ease of digestion – the more broken up it is, the easier it will be to process. Take your time with introducing high-fiber foods back into your diet as these will be harder to digest and can cause blockages. Ileostomates are often encouraged to avoid high-fiber foods to prevent risk of obstruction. Always follow the advice of your surgeon, dietitian, and/or WOC nurse regarding any dietary restrictions right after surgery or on a long-term basis.

If you are trying new foods, it is advised to try them slowly and one at a time. This will help you to have a better understanding of how your body works with the new foods and if any will cause excess gas, constipation, strange odors, or diarrhea. Slowly incorporate them into your diet and make note of how your body responds to them. Remember that every body is different and what affects someone else may not affect you in the same way. This is why it can be helpful to keep a journal or diary of how your body responds to different foods.

Drink Lots of Liquids

It is important to drink lots of liquids with an ostomy. If you have an ileostomy, more specific ileostomy dietary guidelines will be helpful. Dehydration can happen as you lose more fluids daily after an ileostomy, due to the fluid not being reabsorbed into the large intestine. Make sure to hydrate even more on hot and humid days or if you are participating in active sports. (Sports drinks and other high electrolyte drinks can help with this.)
Coffee and tea are fine to drink, but water and juices are still better sources of liquid, so be careful not to use coffee or tea as a substitute for water.

Can I Drink Alcohol With my Ostomy?

Alcohol is fine in moderation, you may want to try one drink (or even a half) and wait and see how it affects your body. Like other carbonated beverages, beer may cause extra gas and uncomfortable bloating but every body is different and what affects one person may not affect you in the same way.

Ostomy Problem Foods

Even though you can still enjoy most of the foods you loved before surgery, there are some foods to be aware of after your ostomy, specifically foods that are hard on digestion and can cause blockages. The following is a list of common foods that can cause problems, as they don’t break down easily:

  • Nuts
  • Seeds
  • Popcorn
  • Dried fruit
  • Mushrooms
  • Raw-crunchy vegetables

Eat these foods in small quantities and be sure to chew them well. If you think you have a food blockage, you should call your doctor or ostomy nurse. Having an ostomy certainly doesn’t mean you have to completely change your diet. By steering clear of a short list of problem foods and making sure to stay hydrated, you can get back to enjoying the foods you love.

To learn more about proper nutrition with an ostomy, visit Coloplast Care online.

Follow the advice of your surgeon, dietitian, and/or ostomy nurse regarding any dietary restrictions right after surgery or on a long-term basis.

Editor’s note: This educational article is from one of our digital sponsors, Coloplast. Sponsor support along with donations from readers like you help to maintain our website and the free trusted resources of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.